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My friends recently got a dog from a family who had to rehome her. She's chihuahua/pug mix, and she's a cutie!

Of course, the "breeder" wouldn't take her back. Shock there.

Anyway, this little "chug" (her name is Honey) is very cat aggressive and my friends don't really know what to do. Every time she sees the cat she goes ballistic and from what I hear, it's FOR REAL prey drive.

I really want to help them out, because I have a feeling that they're going to end up rehoming this poor little dog (again) or giving her to the pound. Due to my current living situation (tiny apartment and no extra resources to care for another dog at the moment), I can't even foster her until I find her a home.

I suggested that they keep her on leash while in the house, but these people really have no idea about dog behavior and I am having a hard time getting them to understand that the dog isn't a bad dog, she just has a high prey drive.

So, what would you all suggest? Is there a Chug rescue group I could contact for them?
 

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I would contact both a chihuahua rescue and a pug rescue. Rescues often take mixed breeds. My dog is supposedly a golden retriever x border collie mix and I got him through a border collie rescue.

Also, hello! Dogs have prey drives. It's totally normal for dogs not to get along with cats. That's stuff you need to think about before you get a dog.

Just had to get that out of my system.
 

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Many Pug rescues will take a pug mix.
 

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While probably not the most popular method, aversion would most likely work. From the sounds of it, it is a very real possibility that the dog would kill the cat, so aversion is an option in my opinion. It would require work, very diligent and consistent work, but it gets results. My shepherd has very high prey drive, and lives peacefully with 2 cats.

Teach the dog a leave it command, all positive methods. Do not let the dog and cat interact while the leave it command is being taught. After introducing some lower level distractions to the leave it training, with the dog on leash, introduce the cat and use the leave it command at the very first sign of interest (the cat could even be in a crate initially). Do not wait until the dog gives chase to give the command, as soon as the dog looks in the direction of the cat give the leave it command and administer a correction that is appropriate for the dog. When the dog looks away, praise/treat/whatever. As things progress, give the dog a split second to look away on its own after the command is given and before the correction is administered - if the dog listens to the leave it command and looks away from the cat, massive praise, play, treats, etc.

It is important (and probably obvious) that the dog and cat should never be allowed to interact without supervision. As great as our DS is with our cats (our female cat loves him and will curl up next to him, weave in and out of his legs while purring, etc), he is a dog and they are cats. The cats are in the basement, which is behind a closed door and a baby gate while we are not home. While they are home with the dog and cat loose together, the dog should have a drag line on, and they should have their heads on a swivel or have the dog tethered to them.

It works if done properly and consistently. You can see how concerned our cats are here, and this picture was not staged (anyone familiar with cats would know that - try getting a cat to do something it doesn't want to). Nico loves to sit on the ottoman like he is in this picture, and the cats love this chair too (hence the towel). It's not infrequent that they share it, and in this picture Nico is actually partially sitting -on- the male cats tail. Aversion is an option to consider at least. Not my favorite method of training, but when it comes to life and death situations (as it might be for the cat), I'm willing to use anything.

Nico and cats.jpg
 

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Ugh, "Chug." Of all the fake breed names I think this one is my least favorite. Almost as stupid as Chiweenie and it just sounds like someone is upset. Lets just call them mixes, that's what they are.

Anyways, back to point...
My dog never wanted to kill my boyfriend's kitten but he did want to play REALLY bad. What we would do is keep the cat in the room that the dog was crated in at night and we did this for MONTHS! Also, while the dog was out of his crate we'd sometimes put the cat in there. This let the animals get used to each other in a safe manner. They can now be out together and be fine 95% of the time.
 

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I have a GSD with a very high prey drive. There is no doubt in my mind that if she got to him that she would severely injure or kill our cat. They are kept separate at all times. Kitty's food, water, and litterbox are kept upstairs. During the day we have a gate up to keep the dog downstairs. At night the dog is locked up in her crate or in a bedroom and the cat has the run of the house. Not ideal but it works.
 

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I love my chug they need to just grin and bear it until she or he is better it could be that it has had run ins with cats training may be a better option
 

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I love my chug they need to just grin and bear it until she or he is better it could be that it has had run ins with cats training may be a better option
Grinning and bearing it is a great way for the cat to get killed. Either way, the cat and dog need to be kept apart when they can't be closely supervised. Climber has given very good and detailed suggestions for reducing the likelihood of an incident occurring between the dog and cat, but it sounds like it might be too much for the OP's friends. :(
 

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1 year old threads should be left to rest in peace.
 
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