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I just adopted a cocker spaniel and he is on meds bc he scratches so much. It has a little bit of prednisone in it.

He is on RX dog food, bc when they rescued him he had large stones and had to have surgery. He is on Royal Canin Urinary SO. Well he scratches like crazy and from what I read it could be bc the corn and rice in the food. Is there a healthy grain free food that is also good for his urinary issues?

Thanks!
 

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I am not a vet----

Urinary crystals can be either a cause of or an effect of a UTI and or in combination. Food or low water intake can be an issue. Basically, more than one cause can be the issue. Kidney stones would be another separate thing though.

My male dog had a UTI and crystals. My vet and I discussed that his kidneys were fine so I went with a partial raw, partial grain-inclusive kibble but made sure he drank a lot of water. No issues in the past year since then.

My vet said that if the kidney's test healthy, then the protein amount of the food isn't a huge issue. So then there are a wide variety of grain-frees that are an option.
 

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Agree with Shell, lots of water is extremely important. Also give him as many opportunities to void his bladder as possible so urine doesn't sit in his bladder and allow crystals to develop. Do you have his health history? There are a lot of different types of stones and besides keeping your dog well hydrated there may be dietary restrictions. Lots of reading here. http://dogaware.com/articles/wdjstruvites.html

My apparent spaniel mix had urine that tested positive for oxalate crystals. He never developed a stone as I was able to give him frequent opportunities to void his bladder [maybe every 2 hours during the dog on average], kept him well hydrated and he was on a naturally extremely low oxalate raw diet. My apparent lab mix had urine that tested positive for struvite crystals a couple times and I treated her for UTI [3 urine cultures and 2 rounds of antibiotic EVERY time!], kept her well hydrated and she never developed any stones.
 

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Interesting info thanks! I didn't realize there were different causes.

Hmmm don't know the specifics on the stones. His paperwork is getting mailed to me by the rescue, so I will have it in a day or so. I do allow him water at all times, but he will only potty in the morning and evening. I let him out more often, but he just won't go. That concerns me now that you say he needs to go often.
I will check the paperwork and also check with my vet. Thanks!
 

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Zoey had UTIs as a pup that were persistent - every other month. I started her on cranberry extract and then gave her some Solid Gold Berry Balance along with changing her diet and feeding her probiotics. I also started to float her food in water because she wouldn't drink water that often. I read online that ash in food can cause crystals to form in urine. The Vet didn't think that cranberry/Berry Balance and probiotics would make a difference but wanted to give Zoey prescription food if she didn't get better.

After doing all of the above I can report that she has been clear now for a while. I no longer float her food in water as she is now drinking on her own, I have stopped the Berry Balance and probiotics as well (although I was thinking of giving her some probiotics just to strengthen the good bacteria). I feed her grain inclusive food that doesn't contain corn, has higher amounts of protein (makes urine more acidic) and is low in ash (below 7%). I am not saying that what I did made her better but it is possible that what I did helped her vs going on prescription food.

Apparently some stones form from too alkaline urine or from too acidic urine or can come from UTIs. For Zoey when she had her UTIs she always had too alkaline PH so that's why I went with the cranberry/Berry Balance and give her more protein. As far as water - more is always better.
 

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Thanks! I thought about giving him a probiotic, but wasn't sure how much. I'll also try the Berry Balance. Great info! Love the idea of food in the water. I will try that because he doesn't drink that much.
I just read about ash in food. Sorry if this is a stupid question, but what is that?
 

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Ash is the inorganic materials aka mineral content like calcium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium etc. It is an important ingredient but there is some discussion that too high of ash content can damage kidney function and too high of ash is bad for large and giant breed puppies. Most guidelines suggest staying under 8% for a healthy adult dog but if the dog has kidney/urine issues, lower ash is better and some formulas can be found in the ~5% range.
 

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I just adopted a cocker spaniel and he is on meds bc he scratches so much. It has a little bit of prednisone in it.

He is on RX dog food, bc when they rescued him he had large stones and had to have surgery. He is on Royal Canin Urinary SO. Well he scratches like crazy and from what I read it could be bc the corn and rice in the food. Is there a healthy grain free food that is also good for his urinary issues?

Thanks!
Listen to your Vet and don't believe what you read about allergies. Food allergies are extremely rare. Tufts University believes that food allergies are as low as 1% of total true allergies, with as much as 99% being environmental allergies. Corn and rice are statistically insignificant when it comes actual food allergies, that small portion of total allergies, rather common animal proteins are to blame.

No one can give you advise about stones unless you explain what stone your dog had. If the stone was a calcium oxalate stone or a cystine stone, please listen to your vet. If the stone was a struvite, then you can look around at some commercial foods.

Don't make the decision base on whether the food has grains or is grain free, you need to use a food that stabilizes the Ph of the dog's urine and has very modest mineral content or Ash, whether its from your vet or the store.
 

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I will agree with what is said about advice on stones because there may be other reasons for the stones, your vet would be the first place to start. But some of the info out there may be confusing to someone and if the dog and owner can benefit from info concentrated onto one site ... great.

I was feeding a grain free food that has higher ash then the grain inclusive that i feed now. If the dog has a high ph then a food that has more meat protein might lower the ph. Theoretically the stuff in blueberries and cranberries keep the urine acidic and has a substance in it that helps ward off bacteria attaching to the urinary tract walls. If the dog has low ph then the above is not a good thing.

If i had been listening 100% to the vet, Zoey would have been on prescription food at this point ... of course what worked for my dog doesn't mean it will work for someone else's dog. But i was able to get info to make some decisions.

Listen to your Vet and don't believe what you read about allergies. Food allergies are extremely rare. Tufts University believes that food allergies are as low as 1% of total true allergies, with as much as 99% being environmental allergies. Corn and rice are statistically insignificant when it comes actual food allergies, that small portion of total allergies, rather common animal proteins are to blame.

No one can give you advise about stones unless you explain what stone your dog had. If the stone was a calcium oxalate stone or a cystine stone, please listen to your vet. If the stone was a struvite, then you can look around at some commercial foods.

Don't make the decision base on whether the food has grains or is grain free, you need to use a food that stabilizes the Ph of the dog's urine and has very modest mineral content or Ash, whether its from your vet or the store.
 

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I will agree with what is said about advice on stones because there may be other reasons for the stones, your vet would be the first place to start. But some of the info out there may be confusing to someone and if the dog and owner can benefit from info concentrated onto one site ... great.

I was feeding a grain free food that has higher ash then the grain inclusive that i feed now. If the dog has a high ph then a food that has more meat protein might lower the ph. Theoretically the stuff in blueberries and cranberries keep the urine acidic and has a substance in it that helps ward off bacteria attaching to the urinary tract walls. If the dog has low ph then the above is not a good thing.

If i had been listening 100% to the vet, Zoey would have been on prescription food at this point ... of course what worked for my dog doesn't mean it will work for someone else's dog. But i was able to get info to make some decisions.
If a dog is predisposed to calcium oxalate stones acidic urine will make it worse. So it all depends on the condition. Struvites form in an alkaline Ph, so in that case animal protein can lower the Ph and help.

This is just chemistry, all urine has mineral components that with a certain Ph will cause the minerals to form crystals and then form stones over time. So, it depends on Ph and the concentration of these minerals.
 
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