Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have filled out countless applications that take up to 30minutes or more for puppies only to receive a brief email along the lines of "the application review committee did not select your application". I don't understand if rehoming these puppies is so important how they can be so picky. I understand people are not qualified and could easily lie on an app, but I would think you at least take the time to interview and visit the home prior to making a decision. It just gets to me cause I really do not want to buy a pet store animal but I feel like they are leaving my fiance and I no choice. We would rather rescue an animal that needs it but we aren't even given the opportunity. Sorry for the rant but it's just extremely frustrating. I live in Maryland in case anyone was wondering :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
It takes time and patience going the rescue route. Try to remember that most rescues are run by volunteers and they have to make decisions based on the information presented and don't always have the time and resources to 'interview' every single applicant - it's unfortunate, but reality.

I would certainly hope you wouldn't give up and buy from a pet store - no one is forcing your hand with that decision, that's yours alone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
We will continue to try, I just needed to vent it in some way. We saw some beautiful Elkhound pups at the SPCA here but they will get a little too big for us right now :-/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
I know in the NE United States, there are sometimes more people wanting to adopt than there are adoptable animals (better spaying/neutering rates up there). Have you considered adopting an older dog? They are less in demand, but come with many perks (mine were already house trained, knew some commands, didn't go through the puppy stages of chewing, etc). As a lot of dogs can live 12+ years (depending on size usually), even a 5 or 6 year old dog can be with you for many, many years.

I also know there are a few rescue groups in the south that actually ship dogs to the NE as there are many, many dogs in the south. You can also travel to a shelter out-of-state. I've lived in the south for several years and I know that shelters in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Florida (I'm sure others too) are willing to do out-of-state adoptions because of the sheer amount of dogs they have. The down side to this though is if the adoption doesn't work out.

Hopefully you will find some dog soon!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,075 Posts
Just wondering if you have tried the shelter route? Here where I am located in NE Ohio I found a shelter/rescue that worked together. This is where I found Abbylynn. The rescue group worked with the shelter and made sure all adoptable dogs were either sponsored or adopted ... and the fee was a very minimal of $100 ... which included all bloodwork, spay/neuter, county license and transportation to PA to the Vet Tech Institute to have this done. There was a 10 day waiting period before I was able to go and pick Abbylynn up after she returned from PA. It was a couple counties away ... but the drive was well worth it. There was a contract involved that the dog would never be an outdoors dog and that they be returned to this particular shelter/rescue if something did not work out ... for life. It was a very good experience. :)


EDIT: I forgot to say ... Abbylynn was 5 months old when I adopted her. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
We currently have a 4 month old Dachshund but we want a playmate for him. We actually got him from a pet store prior to me doing a TON of reading on training and other dog related articles. We wouldn't mind an older dog but it would need to be playful and OK with other dogs. I see a lot of young-senior dogs that are not good with men and/or other dogs for various reasons. Hopefully we will find another puppy soon. I just needed to rant a little :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Just wondering if you have tried the shelter route? Here where I am located in NE Ohio I found a shelter/rescue that worked together. This is where I found Abbylynn. The rescue group worked with the shelter and made sure all adoptable dogs were either sponsored or adopted ... and the fee was a very minimal of $100 ... which included all bloodwork, spay/neuter, county license and transportation to PA to the Vet Tech Institute to have this done. There was a 10 day waiting period before I was able to go and pick Abbylynn up after she returned from PA. It was a couple counties away ... but the drive was well worth it. There was a contract involved that the dog would never be an outdoors dog and that they be returned to this particular shelter/rescue if something did not work out ... for life. It was a very good experience. :)
The closest shelters here are SPCA and BARCS (90% pitbull which we can't have). We are going to look into others and possibly make a day trip visiting some shelters a little farther away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,851 Posts
Is there a specific reason you are being turned down? I know many, many dogs here need good homes. I recently visited a Kentucky shelter (kill) that had probably 15 smaller dogs that were great. There are ground shippers, and rescue transport services that can get dogs to many places all over the country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Is there a specific reason you are being turned down? I know many, many dogs here need good homes. I recently visited a Kentucky shelter (kill) that had probably 15 smaller dogs that were great. There are ground shippers, and rescue transport services that can get dogs to many places all over the country.
There have been no direct statements as to why we were being turned down. All of them have been very generic and saying our application was not accepted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,765 Posts
And if you do end up giving up on rescues, for pete's sake don't buy from a pet store. There are plenty of breeders out there who actually care about their dogs--buy directly from one of them, not from a puppy factory that churns out thousands of puppies without regard for the health and welfare of their breeding animals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Wow, its so hard to imagine! Its VERY easy (almost too easy) to get approved in my area (Houston, TX). I guess being in a such a large city where literally 1000's of dogs are put down daily, they figure its better to give almost any home a shot.

When we adopted our newest addition, there was another couple there wanting to adopt a little boy black lab, 8 weeks old. We were kind of interested in him, but they made the decision first and got him. The woman was 7 months pregnant and neither had ever owned a dog before, let alone a puppy. I was FLOORED when they "approved" them to adopt. That is just horrible timing to get a puppy. It SOUNDS so cute and sweet to raise a puppy and baby together, but we all know the reality of that. After baby comes it will be way too overwhelming, and the puppy will be out the door and probably into a kill shelter (it was at a no-kill rescue) It was so sad to see him walk out the door with them. Hopefully I am wrong and it will work out, he was SUCH a sweet puppy, but those are some big red flags, and they still got approved no problem!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,946 Posts
There have been no direct statements as to why we were being turned down. All of them have been very generic and saying our application was not accepted.
I think I'd ask. If it's just one reason, maybe it could be corrected. Also, consider having a conversation with the adoption coordinator before turning in an application. If you're up front about any potential drawbacks (lack of fenced yard, young children, renter, whatever the case may be), they may be willing to bend rules for you.

I think the most common age group in shelters is the young adult dogs (like around 1yr). People get dogs as puppies and then give them up when they outgrow their puppy cuteness. Some may have baggage, but many won't. I got my dog from a shelter at 7mo. She has always loved men (I think even more than women), and she's great around other dogs (we visit dog parks frequently and have never had an issue). I highly recommend checking out petfinder.com - this website will show you adoptable dogs in your area who fit your criteria. You'll want to visit many before making a decision, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,518 Posts
I have heard of people getting turned down for various reasons. One a 65 year old because the rescue felt she was too old to own a dog. The dog she was looking at was a 3 year old. She went to the pet store and bought a puppy.
A friend was turned down because she had underground fencing, Her subdivision will not allow fences. She went to a breeder and got a dog.
Both of these people were replacing dogs that had died of old age.
Looking on petfinders county shelters have an abundance of pitbulls and pitbull mixes. I even heard this out of mouths of the people who went to the county shelter and looked for themselves. Not everybody wants this breed. Not a bad breed, just not for everyone.
do not be disgruntled by being turned down by one rescue. Look at petfinders.com or hoobly.com or even oodles.com You can narrow your search of what you are looking for. there is a group of people who either by car transport or pilots for paws will be able to get your dog to you. County or city shelters do not tend to be as picky as a private rescue. Keep up your search! Somewhere out there is a dog waiting for you to come along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
The rescue I am with (in New England) sometimes gets 10 applications for one puppy, we must take apps as first come first serve and process them in that order, then send replies to other apps telling them applications are in process and ask if they are interested in another dog. I wouldn't take it personally at all, the same thing that drew you to the pup have drawn other applicants as well. As a foster home I can tell you - my dogs can go for months with zero interest and then I get multiple great apps in a week, always happens!

If you can be patient, you will end up with an amazing and perfect pup for you :)

There are SO many in need, don't be discouraged, it will happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,719 Posts
Agree with hub3. Before we got Biscuit, we applied for a really cute blue merle Aussie mix puppy from the same rescue group, but she was already claimed by a couple who had been preapproved for months. We went through the whole approval process anyway and ended up with the Bisc a few weeks later. You should definitely ask why they're turning you down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
I work with a private rescue as well, and am involved in the dog adoptions and processing applications. It is often the case that many of the applicants are good candidates for the dog. It's just a matter of picking out on you think is the better fit. Those are the hardest to deal with. Take under consideration that you are seeking a puppy; there is always stiff competition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,931 Posts
The rescue I am with (in New England) sometimes gets 10 applications for one puppy, we must take apps as first come first serve and process them in that order, then send replies to other apps telling them applications are in process and ask if they are interested in another dog. I wouldn't take it personally at all, the same thing that drew you to the pup have drawn other applicants as well. As a foster home I can tell you - my dogs can go for months with zero interest and then I get multiple great apps in a week, always happens!

If you can be patient, you will end up with an amazing and perfect pup for you :)

There are SO many in need, don't be discouraged, it will happen.
I'm in NH; what rescue do you work with?
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top