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I need something i can do with my dogs in the yard. Now that i can't take them out sledding all the time. So I was thinking agility would be a good thing to get into a bit..
I might build my own make shift stuff or buy a starter kit with like weave polls and jumps or something.

Could anyone give me just some basic info on how to get started training my dogs the basics. Or if there are any good websites you could direct me too..because i haven't been able to find any yet.
 

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I would find a coach and take one or two of your dogs to lessons so you can learn the basics. Then you can go home and teach it to the rest.

Really, about a dozen jumps and a tunnel are enough to learn the handling. Then you can add pieces if you'd like.

For contact equiptment like teeters and A frames, I would have a coach. You can injure a dog if you make mistakes on contact pieces.

Agility is awesome! Love it!
 

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you tube is good too! For me, there are just too many details to learn by watching, so I found a coach.

Sorry that isn't what you were looking for. I thought I was on-topic! My bad!
 

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I would find a coach and take one or two of your dogs to lessons so you can learn the basics. Then you can go home and teach it to the rest.

Really, about a dozen jumps and a tunnel are enough to learn the handling. Then you can add pieces if you'd like.

For contact equiptment like teeters and A frames, I would have a coach. You can injure a dog if you make mistakes on contact pieces.

Agility is awesome! Love it!
Did you forget what your question was? I see 3 great pieces of advice here.
 

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I would start with foundation work. Targeting, rear end awareness, making sure basic obedience stuff (sits/downs/waits) is up to par. Then start with jumps (low jumps if you're working a younger dog) and try equipment like the tunnel.

Weaves are easy to build, just research the method that you wish to use before you begin and stick with it. I personally like the 2x2 method. Not sure if there is a complete tutorial of it on youtube, though.

And I'm sorry if you didn't "like" the advice given, but trainingjunkie is absolutely right about getting a trainer to help you with the contact equipment. We teach proper contacts on that equipment so that dogs do not injure themselves on it. But if you're not able to build that stuff and you don't feel like doing classes, then you wouldn't have to worry about it, I guess. Though if you can afford class, I would definitely take one of your dogs through it - would be worth it in the long run, even if you're only doing it for fun. Plus then you can get to work with the larger pieces of equipment that are more expensive to buy/build.
 

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Agree with trainingjunkie - it's easy to injure a dog if you don't know what you're doing. If you're serious about agility, take a class. There's just too many details to write in a forum post. It takes many years to master this sport.
 

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Agree with trainingjunkie - it's easy to injure a dog if you don't know what you're doing. If you're serious about agility, take a class. There's just too many details to write in a forum post. It takes many years to master this sport.
This. The equipment is nothing to play around with. I have heard of dogs getting seriously injured or even dying (though the one that died was unattended).
 

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Ok - I'll have to say something here, so please don't take this in the wrong way.

Once you get into any activity that uses equipment - or that is not done with the dog on all fours on flat, level ground - or that is done at high speeds - you run the risk of injuring your dog if you don't do it properly. Even with an experienced handler and a well-trained dog, the risk of injury is still present.

For a 'green team', the risk of injury is obviously higher. There are techniques to using equipment, to training dogs over terrain, to training free-style moves, etc. etc. It is a dangerous misconception to think you can 'just do it', and it is quite difficult to explain in words or even use a video to show how it should be done. A lot of it requires 'hands-on' demonstration with the handler and the dog working together.
 
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