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I know theres many things out there to teach you how to train your dog, but i thought i make thread just for my dog. I need help training her to not jump on me or anyone else. When she does it, i usually see it as a greet but having her jump on you isn't fun for anyone. She also jumps on pple when they are sitting(getting stepped on in the privates isnt fun) Anywho, ive tried the dont give any attention when she jumps on you but she just runs around and jumps on u and so on, ive tried walking away but she just follows. Also ive tried holding her paws until she struggles to get away then treat her but she just bites my hand. I give her a treat and a command to everything of course, i dont want to do a long thread and bored you guys to death so i gave a quick summary. Anywho any other suggestions?



Also i have a problem of keeping her calm in the house. she loves to run every. I want her to be calm and casually walk around the house. Somtimes i can get her to sit next to me and watch tv while i pet her but as soon as someone comes by its havoc with her. Shes just hyper 24/7, i take her out everyday to play everyday until i see that shes getting tired(she stops running and lays down), and every other day i push her untill shes dead tired, but as soon as we get home she goes into her hyper mode. How can i teach her that inside the house=stay calm
 

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some dogs just dont have an off switch, mine doesnt lol!

does she get enough exercise? and training?

branston is super hyper, i play with him loads, we are still training every day to try and wear out his mind, but i just accept that thats the way he is.

we used to have a problem with him jumping up all the time, all over us and our visitors. we have tried numerous ways to stop this to no avail. we gave our visitors treats to give him for sitting, they would walk back out the door until he was calm (they were permanently on the step!) so now we have a small bottle with a couple of pennys inside that we give to our visitors to shake if he wont stop jumping and sit. we also tried time out which didnt work either. at our training classes we were told to try the penny bottle and its the only thing that actually works. it works because branston doesnt like loud noises so he backs off, sits down for a stroke then goes to play. i realise this is not for everyone but perhaps you could try it?
 

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i take her out everyday but just seems that shes a energizer bunny. only time i see her rest is when shes sleeping in the yard bathing in the sun.

But yes, i put come coins in a metal can to make loud noises but it didnt do any good, i tried a spray bottle and she learned to just open her mouth and drink it. im almost considering a shock collar, but i dont want to go there.
 

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Teach her to Sit. When she looks like she is about to jump, then tell her to sit, and give her 3 small treats.

Also, when she gets ready to jump, turn to your side... because that is a calming signal that says please don't jump on me.

Another thing you can try is when you first greet her, stoop down to her level, because sometimes dogs jump in order to get closer to your face.
 

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How old is she? I'm assuming she's a Rottweiler? How much exercise does she get every day?

My recommendation would be giving her a "no" when she jumps. If she continues, say "no" a little louder. If she still continues, put her in time out, either in her crate, or in another room, where she can't continue to act out. She will teach her that disobeying you and jumping all over people gets her exactly the opposite of what she wants.

Honestly, she sounds like a very bored dog who could probably use some more exercise, if all she's doing is zooming around the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Teach her to Sit. When she looks like she is about to jump, then tell her to sit, and give her 3 small treats.

Also, when she gets ready to jump, turn to your side... because that is a calming signal that says please don't jump on me.

Another thing you can try is when you first greet her, stoop down to her level, because sometimes dogs jump in order to get closer to your face.
Thanks, ill try stooping down to her level, that might work.

Ive tried telling her to sit but she doesnt listen while shes jumping. She does sit when shes calm and i ask her too. Ive taught her to sit, lay down and working on roll over.

Turning to the side doesnt really work she just jumps on me or somone else more. It seems like its fun to her(her tail wags)

I dunno..
I kinda like my dogs jumping all over me..
If they stopped doing it... I would be kinda sad.
I dont mind that she jumps on me sometimes but when guest are over she tends to like jumping on them more and doesnt stop unless i go over and hold her. But yeah it would be sad if she didnt come to me and stuff. I just want her to be calm when shes in the house and when were outside its okay to run around.

How old is she? I'm assuming she's a Rottweiler? How much exercise does she get every day?

My recommendation would be giving her a "no" when she jumps. If she continues, say "no" a little louder. If she still continues, put her in time out, either in her crate, or in another room, where she can't continue to act out. She will teach her that disobeying you and jumping all over people gets her exactly the opposite of what she wants.

Honestly, she sounds like a very bored dog who could probably use some more exercise, if all she's doing is zooming around the house.
Shes about 7months still a puppy. Shes a rottweiler/chow chow mix. She gets her exercise every for about a hr, sometimes its two hours just to tire her out more but shes full of energy and doesnt ever want to stop playing.

When i do that, she just barks in the crate for a long period of time and the neighbors have actually told me to shut my dog up in a rude tone. I will keep trying though.
 

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My recommendation would be giving her a "no" when she jumps. If she continues, say "no" a little louder.
I would disagree with this advice, as it's a very good way to get your dog confused about what "no" means. If you do this, your dog learns "oh, so when I'm told no in a medium tone of voice, it doesn't mean anything to me. Only if I get a loud 'no' should I pay any attention."

If you're going to use a correction word, and I don't think that's the best choice in this particular situation, it needs to be clearly associated with consequences if it's not followed. If not, the dog will be confused and learn slower. The dog would learn slower in this instance anyway, as it would have to work harder to figure out what behavior it should offer after the "no" to prevent getting a time out.

Here's what I'd do, which has kind of already been suggested, but I have a different way of explaining it. Decide how you'd like your dog to greet you (I like a dog that comes and sits in front of me for petting), and teach her that. Since your dog already knows sit, this should go much faster.

1) Start with a calm dog (not a greeting situation). Call your dog over to you (while standing), ask for a sit, and give her a treat when she sits. Walk away, call her to you, ask for a sit, treat. Etc You are teaching her that she should sit after approaching you. Put in several repetitions of this. You can move on to #2 when your dog is preempting the sit, or she starts to sit before you ask for it.

2) Same as number 1, only with a more energetic dog. This step is to create the ability to follow your commands when she's excited (which is something you have to teach, not something most dogs are good at). Instead of walking away, RUN away. Entice your dog to chase you. Call "Puppypuppypuppy!" and make other high pitched noises (like "wheeeeeee!" or "come get me!"). When she gets to you, ask for a sit, then reward it with a treat. If she jumps on you, that's information that you've made things TOO exciting, so scale it back a bit (maybe walk quickly away instead of running, or try a less exciting tone of voice). If she's good at this, you can try adding in some of her favorite toys that get her excited, too.

3) Once you've mastered #2, try the exercise in front of the door that you come in. Then, go out the door, close it, come back in and ask for a sit. The first time she sits, give her SEVERAL treats -- in training, this is called a "jackpot." Then try it for longer. Go outside, close the door, count to 3, ask for sit, etc.

4) At this point, your dog has learned to sit on command for you when she's excited after approaching, and her jumping up on you around the house and during play should be almost completely eliminated (or redirected when you ask for a sit) -- now we proof the dog during actual greeting scenarios. When you come home, ask for the sit before you give ANY affection (not even "Hi puppy, sit!") or attention to the dog. If you're lucky, she'll sit -- yay! Give her a treat, your work is done. More than likely, she won't yet.

In this case, refuse to give her any attention until she does what you want. Ignoring DOES work, but there's kind of a technique to it. First, cross your arms. Turn around. Your dog will likely circle to your other side and attempt to make eye contact -- turn the other way and move your gaze away from her. Turning your head away from a dog can be a very valuable tool. Hopefully, with the training she's had, she's learned that sitting elicits food and atttention from you, so she'll offer up a sit that you can reward by showering her with attention. You can also try asking for the sit again once she looks to be getting frustrated that she isn't getting attention. The biggest mistake I see with people that try the ignoring technique on jumping up dogs is that they give in and don't wait the dog out. Your dog WILL get bored and stop jumping up on you -- but she'll jump up even more and probably try other behaviors like barking at you, biting at your hands, etc to get your attention BEFORE she gives up.

In the meantime, while you're training her greeting, here's what I'd do when you come home. Whatever you do, do not give attention to the jumping up dog. You want to remove ALL the reinforcement your dog gets by jumping up on you. You can try one of two things.

1) When you come home, immediately squat down to give her attention so that she doesn't have the opportunity to jump up.

or

2) When you come home, immediately walk away from your dog and put a barrier in between the two of you (IE go to the bathroom or your bedroom and close the door). Give her a couple minutes to calm down, then open the door. If she jumps up on you, close the door, give her another minute and try again. Rinse and repeat until you get a less excited dog (may take a lot of repetitions, ESPECIALLY the first time you try it.) When she doesn't jump up, lavish her with affection and leave the room.

I've successfully used these methods on my foster dogs, many of which had truly awful jumping issues, so they do work.

I'd attribute a lot of the zooming around the house to the age of the puppy, but it also seems like she's looking for something to DO inside the house. Puppies are generally either "off" or "on" -- Awake and going full throttle or asleep. They don't start settling down and "just hanging out" really until adulthood, which is still another 10 months away or so.

I would also try giving her more opportunities to challenge herself mentally (being exercised mentally every day is just as important to dogs as being exercised physically). Feed her her meals from a buster cube, kong wobbler, or squirrel dude. Play games of "find it" (where you hide a treat and she has to look for it with her nose). Play fetch. Teach her to jump over small obstacles. Use your imagination.
 

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CricketLoops advice is perfect. In addition to this you can reward general calmness in the house.

1) Associate the word "yes" a food reward. Cut up a hotdog, chicken or cheese into about 20 pea sized pieces. Say "yes", wait one second then drop a treat on the ground. Repeat. Eventually you should see that the dog looks at you after you say "yes" expecting a treat. You can also do this exercise with a clicker to associate a clicker with a treat. Clickers are more clear but you won't necessarily have one in your hand when you want to reward the dog.

2) Teach the dog that the word "yes" is said in response to his actions. This can be done in a variety of ways. Start by playing the game in the previous step for 3 treats or so. Now wait for him to make eye contact. Say "yes" the instant he does. Wait one second then give a treat. Next ask for a sit then say "yes' and treat the instant his butt touches the ground. If he doesn't have a sit then lure one. YouTube luring a sit if you don't know how.

3) When the dog understands that "yes" is earned from his actions then you can capture calm behavior. Anytime you see him calmly laying around the house say "yes" then get a treat for him. Doing this in combination with ignoring craziness should help calm your dog.
 

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Another thing you can try is when you first greet her, stoop down to her level, because sometimes dogs jump in order to get closer to your face.
You are getting some great advice here, but I just thought I'd add a little caution to this one. Try to hold the leash below the puppy if you do this. A couple times I've stooped down to ours and BAM!!!! Really great way to loose teeth, I haven't but it felt like a close thing lol! Make sure to treat whenever the pup is calm

I kinda like my dogs jumping all over me..
If they stopped doing it... I would be kinda sad.
heh....I kind of felt that way when our puppy was 9 weeks old and she was cute and little.....then I clued in "oh! she's probably going to end up being 100lbs! Letting her think jumping is ok might be a bad idea!". Not to disrespect your sentiment, but it isn't always a great idea to allow a behavior that could become a problem, or be annoying to visitors. Teaching a cue to be allowed to jump on you (We use "up") might be the safest way to go! We make ours sit first though.
 
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