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Hello everyone!

I'm currently in the process of purchasing a young mini poodle stud- he's about 15 months old. The breeder I'm getting him from is too far from my home to get to but from what I could see from their website, general googling, multiple phone calls, and texting - they seemed reputable. He'll come with a limited AKC Registration since I did not want a full registration since we'll not be using him for breeding or showing and she has AKC certified pedrigree for him. She's a goldendoodle breeder (I know, I know) and I went to her specifically asking about her full-bred studs. (I don't have anything against mixes, we've had mutts from the shelter previously - I just didn't particularly want a goldendoodle.) She had said she did have one of her male studs available to sell and that's how we arrived to our mini poodle. The reason for retiring him, she said, was because she was no longer breeding mini goldendoodles just standard size. I asked a friend who's always bought from goldendoodle breeders and she confirmed that that made sense. She seems reputable and I definitely did some research before agreeing but I recently got a comment that she was irresponsible for even trying to breed him so young. Now I'm second-guessing it - anyone have any advice for me?

Thank you!
 

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What health tests has she done? Poodles have several genetic disorders that breeding dogs should be tested for. Poodles are prone to epilepsy.

This is from the Poodle Club of America Foundaton

HEALTH TESTING IN POODLES To help ensure the future health of Poodles, good breeders screen prospective Poodle parents with tests available for primary health issues in our breed. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) and the Canine Health Information Center (CHIC) work with parent clubs to establish important screening criteria, and the following are tests needed to receive a CHIC number for each Poodle variety. Where noted, the PCA Foundation also recommends other DNA tests, some just recently developed as researchers identify faulty genes that cause disease. Eye exams to detect hereditary problems should be done yearly until an age suggested by your veterinary eye specialist. For more on poodle health, go to www.poodleclubofamericafoundation.org.

TOY POODLES DNA Test for prcd-Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) from an OFA-approved laboratory. Yearly Eye Exam by a boarded ACVO veterinary ophthalmologist. Patellar Luxation: OFA Evaluation.

MINIATURE POODLES Same CHIC requirements as Toy Poodles with the addition of: Hip Dysplasia: OFA or PennHIP Evaluation. The PCA Foundation strongly recommends the DNA test for Miniature Poodle Dwarfism (Osteochondrodysplasia) to avoid breeding two carriers to each other and producing puppies affected with this deforming and crippling disorder. Research suggests that about 10 percent of Minis carry the mutation that causes this disease and that it is not limited to a few bloodlines.

STANDARD POODLES Hip Dysplasia: OFA or PennHIP Evaluation. Yearly Eye Exam by a boarded ACVO veterinary ophthalmologist. Health Elective (at least one of the following three tests required for CHIC number): OFA Thyroid Evaluation from an OFA approved laboratory. OFA Sebaceous Adenitis (SA) Evaluation by an OFA approved dermatopathologist. Heart Evaluation by an ACVIM boarded veterinary cardiologist. The PCA Foundation recommends all three electives for Standard Poodles and also strongly recommends the following DNA tests from an OFA approved laboratory to easily avoid breeding two mutation carriers to each other and producing affected puppies: DNA Test for Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures (NEwS) and DNA Test for vonWillebrand’s Disease (vWD). ** Note: A CHIC requirement across all participating breeds is that the dog must be permanently identified via microchip or tattoo in order to qualify for a CHIC number.
 

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This is the link to the parent site:
 

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Yes, she was irresponsible in breeding him so young. At only 15 months, he's too young to have some of the health testing that the breed club recommends. Preliminary OFA hip x-rays can't be done until the dog is 18 months old, and permanent rating can't be done until they are 24 months old at the earliest. Also, at only 15 months, he's not really mentally mature, either.
 

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Shoot.....I wasn't mentally mature either at 15 when girls began consuming my interest.

Even now at 60, I'm not sure at times about my mental maturity..…………….

My suggestion. Take the dog, Care for him and forget about his roots. Dogs live in the now. Enjoy the your new companion.

Mini-poodles are a blast with their intelligence and desire to be part of the family. Take the time to train, socialize and exercise the dog.
 
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