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Discussion Starter #1
I decided I would do a blood panel on one dog every 2 or 3 months since I started them on a RAW diet. Ollie had hers yesterday, and her BUN is elevated at 33. Normal range is between 7 and 25. I'm wondering if it could be to over supplementing. My local vet wants to bring her in for more a urine panel and another blood test in around a month.

She is in the middle of her heat cycle right now, and I had feed her that morning at around 7. She had a turkey wing, a piece of pork roast, 3 ounces of beef kidney, and some cottage cheese with her vitamins mixed in. I give a mix of probiotics, with Solid Gold Seameal, and a Solid Gold Vitamin and Mineral Supplement. She gets a full tablespoon a day, half of which is just the probiotics. She also had 2 fish oil capsules and a Vitamin E pill.

I've never really felt the supplements were necessary but my dog show vet really put her foot done on it. She wanted me to give pet tabs, so we compromised with what I'm doing now. I already faxed her a copy of the blood test results and she will get back to me later today. But I was hoping someone here could give me some extra input. I will still check everything with my vet, but any ideas will be helpful.
 

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I've done more research. I'm pretty sure it’s due to dehydration. It's pretty hot her in Texas now, around 105 in the afternoon. And Ollie has a tendency to play in her water as opposed to drinking it.:rolleyes: She splashes it around with her feet to cool herself off. I have to give her new water every 10 minutes when she's outside in the heat.

So now she can't go out in the afternoon anymore to play. I let her play for a few hours in the morning and another hour or so at night. I hate to do it because I know she's restless. I can't exercise her now because she's in heat. I usually bike her for three miles every other day. But I refuse to have crazed dogs chasing us down the street.:eek: So she'll just have to stay inside for another week or so.

O, I also started watering down her food in the morning.
 

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Watering down her food and feeding raw or canned are great ways to increase her water intake. I've also heard about freezing chicken broth in an ice cube tray and giving the cubes for them to eat, is a good way to increase water. Best of luck!
 

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Most raw fed dogs are well hydrated due to the amount of water in raw food. How old is the dog? Any genetic history of kidney problems in the pedigree? Also, as a human lab tech (and I've also done plenty of animal specimens in the lab) I would never base a decision on one lab test. I would repeat the test along with a urinalysis and complete blood chem panel.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Most raw fed dogs are well hydrated due to the amount of water in raw food. How old is the dog? Any genetic history of kidney problems in the pedigree? Also, as a human lab tech (and I've also done plenty of animal specimens in the lab) I would never base a decision on one lab test. I would repeat the test along with a urinalysis and complete blood chem panel.
As of right now it's only slightly elevated, at 33. I am doing a urinalysis on Monday. But if her urine comes back concentrated I won't do any more tests. She is 19 months now. And there is no history of kidney problems in her pedigree.

But even with the raw being hydrated she still needs to physically consume some water. And she just doesn't drink that much. As hot as it is here now, it’s pretty understandable that she could get dehydrated.
 

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I don't generaly worry too much about an elevated bun unless creatinine is also elevated. I would just continue to monitor. As mentioned above, most raw fed dogs are well hydrated due to the moisture content in food. How's her skin elasticity and capillary refill (press on the gums)? I'm not sure how her heat cycle may alter her bloodwork, if at all.

You really shouldn't have to supplement if you are feeding raw. Sounds like you are giving a lot of supplements and too many vitamins and minerals can be just as dangerous as not enough. Not sure what you mean by the vet "put her foot down"...my vets are a partner in caring for my dogs, but they don't put their foot down about anything related to something as simple as feeding them (except with our diabetic dog, but that's only because we are new to having a diabetic pet so we are deferring to their expertise at the moment).

I'm assuming you did a "pre-raw" blood profile to get a baseline?
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I'm assuming you did a "pre-raw" blood profile to get a baseline?
I didn't do one right before I changed their diet. But my dogs have blood work done every year or two year anyway. I have just decided take blood more often now. Everything else for her kidneys was within normal range.

And I thought about this some more yesterday. Ollie was showing in conformation between July 1st and 12th. She stayed with her handler for that time, and I sent her with a bag of TOTW for food. My handler does add water to kibble, but I don't know how much. So maybe that could have some effect.

As for my vet, she has feed her dogs raw in the past so I feel like her opinion on nutrition is valid. But the idea of the supplements has been bothering me. My dogs get 10% organs every day; it's actually their favorite thing to eat. It was just liver and kidneys, but now I have a raw food supplier that will sell me whole spleens. That should be enough diversity to cover everything and at more manageable levels for the dogs than the supplements.

I started out with the Sea meal on my own for the trace minerals, and it’s a whole food supplement so that shouldn't be a problem. And I don't plan on ordering more of the synthetic vitamin and mineral. I keep thinking it’s just extra money that could potentially put stress on their kidneys. I will probably switch to a splash of apple cider vinegar for trace minerals in the future as well.
 

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Like lovemygreys said an elevated BUN is usually nothing to worry about unless the creatinine is also elevated.

Truthfully, on a dog showing no other signs of issues we ignore an elevated BUN unless it is REALLY high. Even when very high with no other issues we just treat for dehydration and leave it at that. I'm actually a little surprised your vet suggested further testing.
 
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