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Recently, I've been hanging around a few pit bulls or pit mixes and I must say I'm really starting to love them. I'm sort of wondering if my next dog or the one after could possibly be a bully breed of some sort. If I were to get a bully breed, it'll most definitely be a shelter dog because there are just SO MANY out there.

The ones I've met are actually relatively calm but can fetch for a long time. The owners said their dogs are pretty lazy in the house and that might be good if I have to work 40 + hours a week.

So I have a couple of questions, mind you I know virtually nothing about the different types of bully breeds like APBT, Am staffy, etc. I don't think I have much of a preference anyways since it will be a rescue. I'll take whichever comes up and suits me the most temperamentally.

1. How often are there smaller ones around 30-35 lbs (probably up to 45 is alright)? That's probably the size I'm looking for as my next dog.

2. How biddable is your particular dog?

3. I keep hearing they can be DR/DA and it's quite common, is that an exaggeration or is DR that common? I kind of want a dog that would be alright going to the dog park, it's really not necessary but I hope I can find a dog like that.

4. Reliability off leash?

5. Exercise requirements? The least I would do is about 2 hours a day, 1 hr walking, 1 hour dog park, fetch, games, w/e. That's what I have to do with Nia anyways.

6. General health? Are they a healthy breed? I realize there are a few different bully breeds but are they all pretty healthy?

7. Are they prone to SA?

8. Are they more confrontational dogs or like to avoid conflict? I really love dogs that try to avoid conflict as much as possible, Paps are really like that.

9. Would you ever leave your bully breed unsupervised with another dog at home, provided they are about the same size. I'm not going to leave Nia and a 35-40 lb dog unsupervised in the house of course.

10. Anything else you think I should know?


I realize a lot of it is up to the individual dog but I just want to know in general.
 

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Recently, I've been hanging around a few pit bulls or pit mixes and I must say I'm really starting to love them. I'm sort of wondering if my next dog or the one after could possibly be a bully breed of some sort. If I were to get a bully breed, it'll most definitely be a shelter dog because there are just SO MANY out there.

The ones I've met are actually relatively calm but can fetch for a long time. The owners said their dogs are pretty lazy in the house and that might be good if I have to work 40 + hours a week.

So I have a couple of questions, mind you I know virtually nothing about the different types of bully breeds like APBT, Am staffy, etc. I don't think I have much of a preference anyways since it will be a rescue. I'll take whichever comes up and suits me the most temperamentally.

1. How often are there smaller ones around 30-35 lbs (probably up to 45 is alright)? That's probably the size I'm looking for as my next dog.
Staffy bulls stay small. Many true APBTs stay near 45lbs as well. If you get a rescue puppy though, you will have no clue. Often those are American Bullies or mixes thereof and can get much bigger.

2. How biddable is your particular dog?
The dogs I've worked with and owned in the past would do anything for a person. So... very. This is all relative, but generally the bully breeds are people-pleasers.

3. I keep hearing they can be DR/DA and it's quite common, is that an exaggeration or is DR that common? I kind of want a dog that would be alright going to the dog park, it's really not necessary but I hope I can find a dog like that.
I assume by DR you mean dog redirection? Very common. Dog aggression is too, even if it's selective. All of my pit bulls growing up were dog aggressive and had to be seperated, and many shelter dogs have no tolerance threshold for excitement and redirect easily. We had a beagle nearly killed last year as a result of a pit bull in his play group getting overly stimulated by a dog outside the fenced in area and redirecting onto him. Dog parks are a NO NO when it comes to bully breeds of any sort, because if anything happens, THEY are blamed, and THEY will pay the price. Being a responsible bully owner means that you don't set your dog up to fail no matter how well he gets along with other dogs by taking him to an uncontrolled environment. It's been said before and I'll say it again, a pit bull might not start a fight, but he will sure as heck finish it.

4. Reliability off leash?
They aren't in the hound category, they are much easier to train a recall to and want to be by people so that helps. BUT, going back to the pit bull thing, you've got to KNOW they're not going to run after a bicyclist, squirrel, dog, or cat. If they do, they're the vicious dog that's attacking everything in your neighborhood and they/the breed will suffer.

5. Exercise requirements? The least I would do is about 2 hours a day, 1 hr walking, 1 hour dog park, fetch, games, w/e. That's what I have to do with Nia anyways.
Most pit bull types are pretty high energy, but have a good on/off switch from my experience. That MAY be enough for some, but I would take out the dog park and add in a solid hour of fetch, frisbee, something like that, and a bit of training to keep their minds going.

6. General health? Are they a healthy breed? I realize there are a few different bully breeds but are they all pretty healthy?
For the most part, yes. There are few genetic issues in each breed, but nothing that is absolutely common or prevalent like HD in GSDs. Most of them are health tested for heart, eyes, hips/elbows, and ataxia.

7. Are they prone to SA?
In theory I would say so since they are so glued to people, but IME, the ones I've had and known have not had issues with it.

8. Are they more confrontational dogs or like to avoid conflict? I really love dogs that try to avoid conflict as much as possible, Paps are really like that.
This COMPLETELY depends on the dog and breed.

9. Would you ever leave your bully breed unsupervised with another dog at home, provided they are about the same size. I'm not going to leave Nia and a 35-40 lb dog unsupervised in the house of course.
Not for extended periods of time. If I had two dogs that were opposite genders and had no guarding history/behavior or ANY types of spats with each other ever, I would leave them together to do stuff around the house and yard, etc. without eagle-eyeing them, but I wouldn't ever leave ANY dogs together while I was gone from the house. A pit bull could easily kill another dog in a few seconds if you aren't there to stop it, and it doesn't take a lot for some poorly bred pit bulls to become overly stimulated or redirect.

10. Anything else you think I should know?
I would hesitate to bring a pit bull into a home if you're going to be gone 40hrs a week with no one else there to spend time with them. They're people dogs and I think having a dog walker or sitter come by frequently would be a better idea if you're going to do it. They can get extremely depressed and anxious if they don't get enough attention.


I realize a lot of it is up to the individual dog but I just want to know in general.
I don't own any type of pit bull right now, but I am planning on getting another in the near future, and I was raised with them. SO, I wanted to answer anyway. Answers in bold. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the answer.

I wanted to add that there will definitely be a dog walker that comes to take the dog for about an hour outside every day, otherwise the dogs will get dropped off at my mom's for the day until after work so they won't be completely alone and they can get their potty breaks and walks.

The only thing putting me off is dog reactivity or aggression. True dog aggression something I really don't want to deal with.

Acceptance of bully breeds aren't too bad around here actually, I often see pits in the dog park here and all seems to be well but then I didn't talk to the dog park dog owners that much so who knows.
 

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I'm new to this particular breed so I'm learning as I go along. Aries was lazy at first. There is a large variation in size (Aries is currently at 60 lbs.) As you have heard pits are high energy. Mine loves people, I not sure about other dogs. He not agressive towards them but he's still a pup and so far the DA switch is off. As far as SA, they can be clingy they certainly demand attention. They generally very healthy.
 

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Hopefully much more experienced owners will chime in, but in my two years of living with Aija I could offer you just about what DJ did, so the one thing I did want to add is you mentioned dog parks. Personally, I don't think pit bulls and such belong in dog parks, I would prefer to have them exercised by ball, flirt pole, spring pole, other games like that. Also, I wouldn't ever leave them unsupervised with any dogs ever. Aija has shown absolutely NO signs of being reactive or DA, but She is still kenneled when I leave or cannot keep my eye on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Darn, maybe pits are out for me then. I'd really love to have at least one dog that I can take to the dog park! Most BCs are not social enough to be dp dogs either.

Also I don't like to crate more than I absolutely need to and if I'm out for 6 or 8 hours at a time, even if a dog walker comes in between, that's an awful lot of time in a crate.

I guess I could just separate the dogs by putting one dog upstairs to free roam and one downstairs with a door in between or 3 baby gates stacked hmm...
 

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I am by no means an expert, but I can share my experience with my own dog, Tyler. I smile just saying his name, and I really love sharing his story and our life together with others, so if you have any questions or want to know more about how we got to where we are today, feel free to ask! (my answers in Bold)

1. How often are there smaller ones around 30-35 lbs (probably up to 45 is alright)? That's probably the size I'm looking for as my next dog. If you look on Petfinder you will see a LARGE variety of sizes in 'pit bulls'. I have fostered Pit Bull mixes that vary from 35-85 pounds. There is also a trend right now for 'mini pits' which I do not condone at all. My dog, Tyler, is what I believe to be an APBT X. He is 77 pounds, which would be considered too large if he was a purebred APBT.

2. How biddable is your particular dog?
I think this varies a lot depending on the individual. Terriers were bred to work independently and to be able to think on their own, so they are not particularly known for being biddable. However, Tyler is the most biddable dog I have ever had. Previous to him, I've had Cocker Spaniels, Shar-Peis and Bloodhounds. Compared to the Retrievers that I work with, Tyler is very difficult. He definitely has a mind of his own, but he really does aim to please and gets enjoyment out of 'working' for me. Tyler is CGC certified and we do Rally and Agility. We are hoping to start competitive obedience soon. I use a lot of positive reinforcement in my training, and Tyler has been a star in every class we have gone to. So don't be convinced into believing that you need to use harsher methods with a 'bully breed'. I should mention that at our training center, out of 4 demo dogs, 3 are 'bully breeds'.

3. I keep hearing they can be DR/DA and it's quite common, is that an exaggeration or is DR that common? I kind of want a dog that would be alright going to the dog park, it's really not necessary but I hope I can find a dog like that. I think a lot of the issues with DA are blown out of proportion. However, I believe it can be a problem and should be closely monitored from the very beginning. Are Pit Bulls more prone to DA? That is a topic of contention, for sure. IME, Tyler has been great. From day one he went to dog parks and up until he was 3, I never had a problem. Now that he is older, I am starting to see some DA issues. However, I have other factors that I believe are contributing to it. I believe you must be proactive with any 'bully' breed to ward of the potential of DA. Are Pit Bulls Dog Park Dogs? No, most really aren't. IME, they prefer people over dogs. Does that mean that its out of the question? No but you need to do proper socialization, training and exposure.

4. Reliability off leash?
Its all in the training. Tyler is my hiking buddy and I trust him to be off leash for days at a time in expansive wilderness. Do I trust him to be off leash in a downtown area? No. But this is more an issue of my faulty training than with him. If you start early, there is no reason why you should not be able to achieve a reliable recall.

5. Exercise requirements? Tyler was a crazy man as a puppy. I spent at least 2-4 hours a day wearing him out. I did 1-2 hours at the DP, then another hour walk with an hour of ball/chase play off leash. Then lots more playing at home. Now that he is an adult, his energy levels have decreased substantially. He will stay in bed until noon if I let him. He is quite the couch potato and has an amazing 'off' switch. However, if he sees the hiking gear or off leash collar come out, he is ready to go! I would describe his energy level as 'medium'. Now we take an hour walk followed by another hour or so of tug, each day. A few days a week we will do longer off leash walks as well. There have been days when he wasn't able to get out for a walk, and I did notice a difference. However, it wasn't like he was bouncing off the walls or chewing the furniture. He was just more fidgety. For the vast majority of the day, he can be found on my bed or on the couch.

6. General health? Are they a healthy breed? I realize there are a few different bully breeds but are they all pretty healthy? Its a crap shoot. I am pretty cynical about health in general though. Tyler has been completely healthy. No issues, not even small ones. Besides regular check ups, we have been to the Vet twice. Once for a split nail and just this month he was diagnosed with hypo-thyroidism. The Vet told me that it was pretty UNcommon to see this in his breed type and age.

7. Are they prone to SA? Not that I know of? I have never had an issue with Tyler and admittedly, have not been overly proactive about it. As a pup, he rarely whined or cried and never caused any trouble when I left him. Now as an adult, he might whine for 10 seconds after I leave but then he will settle down.

8. Are they more confrontational dogs or like to avoid conflict? Hmm... IMO, because of the traits they were originally bred for, they should not back down easily. This doesn't mean they are confrontational though. We pass by barking/lunging dogs regularly on our walks and he ignores them completely. We also deal with yapping puppies in classes sometimes and he does a very obvious head turn away. Tyler doesn't start trouble, but he will finish it.

9. Would you ever leave your bully breed unsupervised with another dog at home, provided they are about the same size. I do and I don't worry. Ozzie is about 20 pounds heavier than Tyler but not quite as agile or athletic. They stay at home, with an open doggie door, unsupervised. I have never had an issue. I should also mention that Ozzie and Tyler have never, ever, ever had a fight. Not even a disagreement. I can leave them alone with a Kong or bone for each. They respect each other (or at least thats how I interpret it). I often have several dogs at my house as well, and I completely trust Tyler to be alone with them. His best friend is a 25# Boston Terrier X and they are left alone together with no worry.

10. Anything else you think I should know?I didn't think much about the bully breed bias, breedism or BSL before I got Tyler. I thought it was nonsense and stupid and it didn't really seem to effect the population around me. I should have taken it a lot more seriously because I have moved 3 times since getting Tyler and breedism is prevalent and rampant. I surely do not notice it when I am out without Tyler, but as soon as I take him out, its apparent. Unfortunately, this is a reason why I am considering not owning another APBT. Tyler has been blamed for actions that he could not possibly have done. There are too many examples to list, but one sort of funny story is: Ozzie got into a scuffle at the DP. A dog attacked him and he has a small bleed from his lip. I was checking him over when a woman came up to me and said, 'I bet it was that Pit Bull! I don't know why he is here, but those things are dangerous!' She was pointing at Tyler. :doh:

Another thing is that all the Pit Bulls I know are super human friendly. Tyler is definitely a social butterfly. He loves nothing more than when people tell him how handsome he is and rub his belly. He is also really good at reading people and if someone looks happy to see him, he will go up and give them a big kiss. I get asked if he is dangerous a lot, and I tell people he is only dangerous if you are allergic to kisses. He gives the best, most exuberant, kisses!

One last thing, start training early. If you decide to get a Pit Bull, realize that he will be incredibly strong by the time he turns 1. Stronger than you could imagine! I know I was shocked by the sheer pulling strength Tyler has. Also, I never recommend tie-outs for these guys because of their strength. I have gone through a lot of really good collars!
I also love sharing pictures of him, so without further ado, I introduce Tyler J
IMG_2451.jpg IMG_2006.jpg IMG_0239.jpg IMG_0967.jpg
 

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1. How often are there smaller ones around 30-35 lbs (probably up to 45 is alright)? That's probably the size I'm looking for as my next dog.

in rescue not as often. they're usually big, bulky or both. the smaller guys do come through rescue some though

2. How biddable is your particular dog?

which one? there is a lot of temperamental variability. Bolo is biddable enough that even with insane dog aggression, she will sit still if i ask her to when there's another dog around.

the others in my house right now...one is a stoopid teenager and a hellion. one is an elderbull and a biddable hellion and the other two waffle between lump of mud and comedian.

3. I keep hearing they can be DR/DA and it's quite common, is that an exaggeration or is DR that common? I kind of want a dog that would be alright going to the dog park, it's really not necessary but I hope I can find a dog like that.

no.

4. Reliability off leash?

breed prejudice makes this an EXTREMELY bad idea. the other thing that makes it a bad idea is that even if a pit bull is NOT dog aggressive...if another dog starts something..where is the finger going to be pointing?

5. Exercise requirements? The least I would do is about 2 hours a day, 1 hr walking, 1 hour dog park, fetch, games, w/e. That's what I have to do with Nia anyways.

varies.

6. General health? Are they a healthy breed? I realize there are a few different bully breeds but are they all pretty healthy?

very. in the grand scheme of things pit bulls are very healthy. because they have traditionally been outcrossed between the three major pit bull type breeds.

7. Are they prone to SA?

they're people whores. as long as there's a people within a discernable radius..they've got teh loves..

8. Are they more confrontational dogs or like to avoid conflict? I really love dogs that try to avoid conflict as much as possible, Paps are really like that.

no...bullies are buttheads and complete clowns.

9. Would you ever leave your bully breed unsupervised with another dog at home, provided they are about the same size. I'm not going to leave Nia and a 35-40 lb dog unsupervised in the house of course.

NEVER EVER EVER EVER.

10. Anything else you think I should know?

narrow your breeds down? maybe?
 

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too big. Ambulls are more in the 60ish range.

Id suggest an elderbull honestly. Michio sound like the perfect elderbull adoptor.


and a senior pit bull is just about the last dog that gonna get adopted. specially if its black.

and Carla Lou..the Pin Ups For Pit Bulls founder's dog...just turned 17. so they can live for a while barring health problems. and even with health problems..Bo is getting up there, pushing double digits with lymphatic system cancer and is still kickin...

they also would be more mellow, less likely to do the DA thing(which as Bo gets on..appears to also be beginning to mellow out)
more stable in temperment...etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I for sure don't want a pitty puppy. I'm leaning towards Staffys if anything just because they're smaller. But honestly I just want to rescue so I'm not that picky at all.

An older one is really a good idea I just feel so bad because I see sooo many of them in the shelter but all the ones I've met are amazing dogs :(

The bothersome thing to me is DA and breed prejudice, that's probably the biggest reason preventing me from getting a pit in the future. I love the breed for the most part but I don't know if I can deal with flat out negotiable dog aggression @[email protected]
 

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I for sure don't want a pitty puppy. I'm leaning towards Staffys if anything just because they're smaller. But honestly I just want to rescue so I'm not that picky at all.

An older one is really a good idea I just feel so bad because I see sooo many of them in the shelter but all the ones I've met are amazing dogs :(

The bothersome thing to me is DA and breed prejudice, that's probably the biggest reason preventing me from getting a pit in the future. I love the breed for the most part but I don't know if I can deal with flat out negotiable dog aggression @[email protected]
If you adopt an older, mature dog, you can do numerous meet and greets and talk to rescue officials about guarding behaviors or their history with other dogs. If you adopt a 5yo that gets along great with other dogs and has no issues with guarding/etc. I do not expect that dog to turn into a DA dog. It's puppies that you have to worry about the most, because you have NO CLUE what they will turn into as an adult. Most adult personalities/traits are set in stone. Could a rough incounter change that? Yes, a little. I still wouldn't expect your dog being attacked turn him into a completely DA dog. Maybe reactive, maybe a little tense and hostile in new situations, but I wouldn't worry about it with it's pack dogs.
 

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Hopefully much more experienced owners will chime in, but in my two years of living with Aija I could offer you just about what DJ did, so the one thing I did want to add is you mentioned dog parks. Personally, I don't think pit bulls and such belong in dog parks, I would prefer to have them exercised by ball, flirt pole, spring pole, other games like that. Also, I wouldn't ever leave them unsupervised with any dogs ever. Aija has shown absolutely NO signs of being reactive or DA, but She is still kenneled when I leave or cannot keep my eye on them.
I knew Aija was perfect. <3

I will pay shipping costs. $$$
 

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I can only speak from the experience I have with my dog, who is the only "bully breed" I've ever personally owned and grown to know. Charlotte is not a purebred, keep in mind though. She's a combination of Heeler and we THINK American Staff, though that's based on what everyone else tells us.


1. How often are there smaller ones around 30-35 lbs (probably up to 45 is alright)? That's probably the size I'm looking for as my next dog.

Charlotte weighs 35 pounds exactly. APBT are larger, in the 45+ range, where as Am. Staffs are smaller.

2. How biddable is your particular dog?

Charlotte is very good is MOST situations. She does have issues focusing however when around strange dogs. We're working on this though.

3. I keep hearing they can be DR/DA and it's quite common, is that an exaggeration or is DR that common? I kind of want a dog that would be alright going to the dog park, it's really not necessary but I hope I can find a dog like that.

It varies from dog to dog, but unfortunately yes, they DO have a higher tendency to be DA. In Charlotte's case, there's some dogs she meets and automatically loves, and others she meets and hates. We believe her aggression is fear based. She was a street dog my husband found in downtown Nashville, TN while he was hitch hiking through. Her body was covered in scars and bite marks and it was pretty obvious that she had been through something during her time out there, most likely run ins with other strays or fighting for food. As for bringing them to the dog park, I'd strongly advise against it. And this is something I don't hold just towards bulldogs. I think public dog parks are a bad idea for ANY breed, because quite literally anything can go wrong there.

4. Reliability off leash?

Charlotte is very good offleash, however we keep her leashed in areas with high probability of running into other dogs to avoid trouble. We allow her offleash on our property or out in the woods though.

5. Exercise requirements? The least I would do is about 2 hours a day, 1 hr walking, 1 hour dog park, fetch, games, w/e. That's what I have to do with Nia anyways.

I'm constantly moving with Charlotte, as she accompanies me through out the days, so a lot of her exercise she gets from that. Then just before dark, we spend about an hour out in the yard, playing around with her kong or something. All in all, she's a very mellow dog that's up for whatever you want to do.

6. General health? Are they a healthy breed? I realize there are a few different bully breeds but are they all pretty healthy?

This I'm honestly not sure of this. Charlotte has teeth issues due to an underbite, but I'm not sure about illnesses that are prone to the specific breed.

7. Are they prone to SA?

Not sure what SA means

8. Are they more confrontational dogs or like to avoid conflict? I really love dogs that try to avoid conflict as much as possible, Paps are really like that.

Yes and no. Charlotte has never started a fight with another dog before. Typically, she avoids other dogs. But she NEVER backs down from a challenge.

9. Would you ever leave your bully breed unsupervised with another dog at home, provided they are about the same size. I'm not going to leave Nia and a 35-40 lb dog unsupervised in the house of course.

Depends on how comfortable they are with each other. Charlotte would only get along with another dog that was really non-confrontational and submissive to her. Charlotte is by no means a bully to other dogs, but if they "step on her toes" somehow, they would HAVE to back down imediatly. In her particular case, that's the only way it would work.

10. Anything else you think I should know?

I'd be aware of the BSL in your area or particular areas you plan to go to.
 

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1. How often are there smaller ones around 30-35 lbs (probably up to 45 is alright)? That's probably the size I'm looking for as my next dog.: Near me it's common but not SUPER common, you often find the shorter but bulkier bode type. (So less height and more muscle mass/weight) Jetta is 22' at the shoulders and a hefty 56 pounds of muscle. Everyone thinks she's more in the 35-45 range however.

2. How biddable is your particular dog? Extremely, she not perfect, being a very intellegent dog she has her moments of horror-dom but all in all she's extremely good.

3. I keep hearing they can be DR/DA and it's quite common, is that an exaggeration or is DR that common? I kind of want a dog that would be alright going to the dog park, it's really not necessary but I hope I can find a dog like that.

In my area...I don't see too mant truly DA/DR dogs...then agian I'd like to think I hang out with the right sorts of people. Are you more likely to run into these problems rescueing an adult, yes. But this is with any breed imho.


4. Reliability off leash? Jetta's prey drive has been controled since she was itty bitty, critters are friends not food. She's extremely reliable off leash in appropriate places. As for a bully with high prey drive (such as my friend's Romeo) I wouldn't chance it.

5. Exercise requirements? The least I would do is about 2 hours a day, 1 hr walking, 1 hour dog park, fetch, games, w/e. That's what I have to do with Nia anyways. It varies for my crew, they play in the back yard several tims a day anywhere from 10minutes to an hour. We often go for walks for about an hour, somedays we do hiking a bit sometimes a TON, somedays we go to the dog park for hours. It all depends on the dog, if Jetta doesn't do more then play in the back yard one day she's not too stressed over it.

6. General health? Are they a healthy breed? I realize there are a few different bully breeds but are they all pretty healthy?
As far as I know they tend to be.

7. Are they prone to SA?
I've never heard of a Bully with real SA, they LOVE them their people but I really don't know.

8. Are they more confrontational dogs or like to avoid conflict? I really love dogs that try to avoid conflict as much as possible, Paps are really like that.
A lot of bullies I know won't START anything 98% of the time, but I've seen them tend to finish it. Jetta herself is a VERY nonconfrontational.

9. Would you ever leave your bully breed unsupervised with another dog at home, provided they are about the same size. I'm not going to leave Nia and a 35-40 lb dog unsupervised in the house of course. I have, Jetta has known the boys since she was 6 weeks old, if there where any squabbles etc. I wouldn't but there's never been any. Usually the boys are left out and she's in the crate however, more to protect my house from a bored pibble then to protect any dog.
 

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She IS perfect! So you can't have her right now! But the second she starts acting like a butthead, shes headed your way.
I'm holding you to it! And you better watch your back, I'll be stalking your facebook and such to find the most opportune moment to 'nab her for being bad! She better start acting up!
 
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