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Discussion Starter #1
I didn't want to steal the pit bull thread, but I would like to hear about the different breeds that are successful in tracking in search and rescue. No offense to anyone in schutzhund, but I view that as simple tracking. I have seen many breeds in air scenting, but seems tracking is more of certain breeds. I have one malinois certified through NAPWDA, and just started another 6 month old mal last week.
 

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This is not for SAR but Blue Lacys are known for their almost-instinctive tracking ability. They do blood tracking mostly. When I owned one we had a Blood Trailing seminar out in West Texas and a tester came from the United Blood Trackers Organization http://www.unitedbloodtrackers.org/.

The UBT-I test is 400 yards, with at least 2 turns and one wound bed, aged at least 2 hours, and using 8 oz. of blood dropped intermittently along the track. There is a game part at the end (Deer skin or leg, etc.) It is NOT a 'drag' test.

There was a 4.5 month old Lacy pup that ran the Level I track and passed with flying colors. This was the first track the pup had ever been on. He did take a little longer to run it than some of the older dogs, but he found the game at the end!

My Lacy, Ranger was 14 months old and I'd had him on less than 10 training tracks total, and he passed the Level I with no problem. Under extremely dry, dusty conditions with wind gusts of 25+ mph and the tester said he counted no less than SIX different wind changes during the test. Ranger did it off leash at nearly dead run, missed the first 90 degree turn but successfully redirected himself, and finished through scrub brush and mesquite in about 15 or 20 minutes. I just huffed along behind!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Tracking game would be equivalent I think, as its varied terrain, long trails, and possibly fairly old. Do they only track blood trails, or are they used to track prey before the hunt?

I have seen some difference in dogs on game vs human. Some have a natural tendency to track animals, and some for man tracking. From what I have seen, though you can train some dogs, others always want to 'critter'.
 

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If they are used for hunting wild pigs, they track that game. They can also be used for 'coon hunting. I've also heard of some being trained as bird dogs. They're pretty versatile, but certain bloodlines are known more for certain things, like tracking, or herding cattle, or pig dogs.
 

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In NZ...
The dogs used in Urban Search and rescue here are pretty much all pound mutts.
Land SAR has lots of GSPs, also Borders and GSDs
Alpine SAR has a number of Border Collies
Competitive tracking is lots of Borders, Goldens, GSDs
Hunting for pigs is usually mix breeds, farm dog/bully breed mixes are common, and farm dog/sighthound
And for tracking native birds for banding, GSPs are very popular
 

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I train my aussies in tracking, my male who has two tracking titles is also training for "Nose Work" now. I would really like to get him started in SAR since he has such a high drive for tracking.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
GSP? I haven't seen one tracking. I would have assumed they would rely more on sight, so that's interesting thank you!
Aussies, border collies, gsds all are great.
 

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I know people who do tracking with their weimaraners, and do pretty well. Weims do have very good noses.
 

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I've seen Dobes used for tracking, cadaver dogs (which I think is a lot of air scenting) and as drug sniffing dogs.
 

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Tracking and scentwork are two different things. They are taught differently and they require different canine capabilities and skillsets.

Some trainers who work both go so far as to say they are incompatible to some extent. I don't know if I would go that far, but they are very different.

A dog that is using both ground-tracking and air-scenting about equally in following a trail is considered to be "trailing", rather than tracking. Some people think that trailing is good and useful. Some don't like it at all.

I do know that in tracking tests and trials, if a judge considers that a dog is clearly trailing rather than tracking , they can lose points or be whistled off the track.

As far as breed specifics are concerned, the "traditional" tracking and scent-work breeds do tend to predominate in both activities. However, I've seen enough different dogs - including mixed breeds - doing one or the other that I would hesitate to be categorical about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I enjoy hearing of the different breeds! I train hrd, trailing, and, tracking, and they all pose their own issues. I don't know that one is harder than the other, but they do require different type dogs to realty be successful.
 

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I would recommend:

Labrador Retrievers
Collie
Doberman Pinscher
German Shorthaired Pointer
German Wirehaired Pointer
Spanish Water Dogs
German Shepherd
Vizsla
Bloodhound
Australian Shepherd
Newfoundland
Schnauzer
Border Collie
Golden Retriever
Rottweiler
APBT
Bernese Mountain Dog
Dalmatian

These are all common dog breeds used for Search and Rescue
 

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happybooker1, good to see another Lacy owner over here! Did you make it out to the Texas Blood Trail Seminar this past weekend? Another vote for Blue Lacy breed! They'll track whatever you tell them to. There is a lady who owns one that does (SAR) that I know of. I'm sure there is more but this is just one that came to my head. Me, personally I use mine on tracking deer primarily but they will find hogs also.

 
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