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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, awesome forum by the way, I was wondering if anyone could help suggest a breed of dog for me. I will list a few important(I hope) points that might help with suggestions.

I live in a smaller house with a small yard, but outside of town. I jog frequently and would really like a dog to jog with, I live in a low traffic area so it would be nice not to be alone. My typical time is jogging is 30-45 minutes, 5-6 times a week. I would prefer a dog that doesn't shed like crazy but that's not a huge issue for me. I live in Ontario so dogs easily obtainable would be nice, hope this helps. Thanks.
 

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I depends a bit on how you run. My neighborhood has lots of joggers, but I can pass some of them at a slightly brisker than normal walking pace. Some runners could easily cover 6 miles in 45 minutes. Even some smaller dogs can keep up with the faster pace. I recently saw a bio piece on a pro fighter who does his roadwork with his Jack Russell Terrier. The little guy had no problem keeping up with the big guy. The fighter covered many miles a day, at a pretty good pace.

So then it's a question of weather (even some short haired dogs can tolerate cold weather if they are moving), terrain (large breeds generally suffer more on pavement), and what kind of personality you like in a dog.

No dog--especially large breeds--should be regularly run on pavement until they are fully grown (about 2 years of age).
 

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Do you want a purebred specifically? If not there are lots of active young dogs in shelters (lots of lab mixes) that would LOVE to go for a jog every day and make good pets.
 

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An old-fashioned large breed shelter mutt sounds like the ideal candidate. Lab mixes will shed quite a bit if they take after their Lab sides, but I'm sure if you found a Poodle or Pit mix (usually super common in shelters) you would be good to go.
 

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Ontario has BSL, IIRC, so a pit or pit mix is out, which is a shame. I'd look for a smallish terrier or poodle mix, in the 25 pound range.
 

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Interesting thing about running with a lab - at least my black lab (and I can't generalize.)

He was the easiest, most agreeable dog I've even known but, though he would cheerfully walk with me all day, I could not run with him. He would chase me down and throw me to the ground.

Even when I'd take my (then) young kids sledding, he would catch me half-way down the hill, drag me off the sled (which would then continue on without me,) drag me a bit through the snow and then sit on me and lick my face. (Have I mentioned he was 115# at his fighting weight?) It was great fun for him and very amusing to my children, but not that much fun for Dad.

In all other respects, he was a perfect gentleman, so it wasn't a deal-breaker, but I sometimes wonder if others have encountered this behavior.

If running is a priority, I imagine any dog with the stamina could be a running partner (with some training.) You might need to think more about what you'd like from a dog at home, during that majority of the day when you're NOT running.
 

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I agree that looking at your local shelter is a great place to start. Looking for a dog that is at least 1 year old might be a good thing too as you cannot run with a puppy. Either way you will have to allow the dog some time to build up to 45 minute runs but many breeds or breed mixes could easily do that. Stay away from the short nosed dogs as breathing is an issue and over heating. Look for dogs with coat type that fits your needs. Don't be fooled by short hair dogs, thinking they won't shed as much. Many short hair dogs shed like crazy. You might want to look at Retriever/Spaniel type mixes as they would likely fit your needs. Nothing wrong with Purebred dogs either, there are often many of those in shelters as well. They great thing about shelters is you can sort of "trial run" your dog to see how it seems to work with you. :) Good Luck to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the advice everyone and to address some of the other issues I read. I jog on and off road during my runs, between rougher pavement and trail anywhere from 3-4 miles each run.

Just out of curiosity, if I got a dog around 1 year old from a shelter would it be more difficult to train him/her? I have never even been to a shelter so I don't know if they train them at all or anything like that.
 

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No, a 1 y/o is still highly receptive to training. Dogs can be taught new behaviours even in their senior years.

What are you looking for training-wise? Have you ever owned a dog?
 

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Shelters don't normally have the resources to do much training, but many of the dogs arrive there (due to no fault of their own) already housebroken and trained.

The best of the shelters will evaluate the dog.

An untrained adult dog is, in my opinion, no more difficult to train than a pup and they have longer attention spans and more control over their bodily functions.
 

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Thanks for the advice everyone and to address some of the other issues I read. I jog on and off road during my runs, between rougher pavement and trail anywhere from 3-4 miles each run.

Just out of curiosity, if I got a dog around 1 year old from a shelter would it be more difficult to train him/her? I have never even been to a shelter so I don't know if they train them at all or anything like that.
Generally shelters do not train the dogs, though sometimes they have volunteers who will work with individual dogs. I was one of those volunteers with our local shelter. There are some fantastic dogs that end up in shelters. I would recommend that what ever dog you decide to get that you take them to some obedience classes. Those classes are designed to help the owner learn to teach the dog. I highly recommend them. Make sure you are looking for a trainer that works with positive motivation methods. Clicker training is great. As far as whether or not a 1 year old is trainable the answer is a huge YES. I have found that taking in dogs that were around that 1 year old age... give or take proved to be a wonderful age for training. Each dog is an individual so try a few out at your shelter. Get more of a feel of what it is you would like to live with. Remember that even if they are quite hyper when you see them that a little training and exercise will remedy that. Most shelter dogs spend over 23 hours a day in a little cage. You can see why they would be a little "out of hand" when they finally get out of that cage. They improve quickly with a little love and attention.
 

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...I sometimes wonder if others have encountered this behavior.
Let a retriever devise the game, and you get some interesting things. My Golden gets along well with my SIL's small white dog--except when the little guy initiates the "can't catch me" game. It's my opinion that Rusty then views him as a self-propelled retrieving dummy, and runs him down and tries to pick him up. The little guy apparently thinks (not unreasonably) that his untimely demise is imminent, and gets belligerent as all gettout. This only makes the game more fun and interesting for my dog.

Retrievers have a strong drive to chase, and they never lose their drive to play.
 

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Since you like some activity, you might also look into Border Collies or BC mixes. Many make great running partners, and if you decide to try out Agility, etc, you could have lots of fun there as well. I've seen some really nice BC mixes at the local shelters here. Depending on the areas, some have quite the selection. I live in town myself, but have a small place as well, and my girls and new guy do great in my small place, as we get out alot. The key to the BC is activity. And since you sound fairly active, it could be a good option.

Another you might think about, which is usually a bit calmer but will easily keep up with you is a Sheltie. I just love my Chloe to death. She can't quite keep up with Nell, but she keeps up with me real easily with all the activities I do with them. And when we are done, she's usually more tired than Nell, Nell just wants to keep going, lol. And I'm usually beat after that, lol. But I do tire them both out on occasion to where they crash when we get back home for a couple hours, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
To those curious I don't own a dog myself, but my parents have a Shih Tzu. He's 5 and his name is Lex and I spend a lot of time with him. I walk him every day and he's a great little dog.

I will be sure to check out local shelters, I'm a little ashamed to say it but I never even thought about rescuing a dog until I read your posts.
 

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I will be sure to check out local shelters, I'm a little ashamed to say it but I never even thought about rescuing a dog until I read your posts.
I have been there before. Thats why I love this place. Good luck on your search and please let us know what you choose.. And make sure you bring pictures :)
 

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I'm a little ashamed to say it but I never even thought about rescuing a dog until I read your posts.
Then our work here, if not done, is at least coming along nicely.

Shelter, rescue organizations and very good breeders are all fine places to get a dog (though the latter will require some patience.)

Pet stores, newspaper classifieds, the truck in the supermarket parking lot and the hand-lettered sign on the side of the road promising "Platinum labs" are not such good places.

In fairness, though, the best dog I ever expect to have came from an ad in the local shopper. We were extremely lucky. (He was the one who wouldn't let me run or go sledding, but enriched our lives in so many other ways that it didn't matter.)
 

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I will be sure to check out local shelters, I'm a little ashamed to say it but I never even thought about rescuing a dog until I read your posts.
Just a quick little piece of advice, don't jump on the first dog you see that you like. Go in several times, walk the dogs, ask questions about the dog, etc. There are a lot if good dogs in the shelters, and a few bad apples as well. But overall, quite a few of them have come from good homes, like my Chloe. She ended up in the Humane Society because the kids kept leaving the doors open and she kept wandering off and getting picked up by animal control. They just got tired of paying to bail her out, so they said to keep her, and I was there when she came up for adoption and took her. She's a great dog, walks nice on leash, and loves people, kids, dogs, cats, etc. Very well socialized. So it's not impossible to find an almost perfect dog. :)
 

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If you do decide on a particular breed, there are breed specific rescues, too. (I didn't know that until I joined this forum.)
 

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Even when I'd take my (then) young kids sledding, he would catch me half-way down the hill, drag me off the sled (which would then continue on without me,) drag me a bit through the snow and then sit on me and lick my face.

.....I sometimes wonder if others have encountered this behavior.
Haha, Willow (yellow Lab) did that if we took her sledding. I think we took her sledding....mmm....twice, maybe 3 times. We learned quickly :D .
 
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