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The breeder that I got my dog from breeds labs and labs only. However, her neighbors great Dane jumped her fence and got her lab pregnant. Thus, creating a litter of Labradanes. Lincoln is a lot smaller than I thought he would be which has created a bit of confusion. I am now having a hard time figuring out what breed to nurture as far as feeding and exercising needs. She had him on labrador puppy food since he has been weaned but when I received him he seemed a bit bloated so I bought food fit more for a Dane with lower percentages in crude fat & protein and his belly has gone done a considerable amount. (He has been on dewormer so this is not a concern). Anyways now that I have him in person he seems very small in comparison to most dane puppies @ 6 weeks old. His body structure does seem to be more great Dane like when looking at his hips. Does anybody have any experience with Labradanes? If so, about how big do they get? I will post a few pictures and would appreciate any feedback. TIA :wink:

lincoln 5.jpg lincoln 2.jpg lincoln 3.jpg lincoln 4.jpg
 

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Cross breeds can be a real grab bag of breed traits and types. You might wind up with a dog that looks like a Great Dane, but the size of a Lab, or a dog that looks more like a Lab, but Great Dane sized.

You don't need a breed specific food. Pretty much any large bred puppy food would be fine. I'd still take a fecal sample in to the vet to be checked, even if he's been dewormed.

It's too bad that they didn't keep the pups until they were at least 8 weeks old, so that they could have more time with their mom and littermates.
 

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Thanks for the input! I have scheduled a new pet appointment for him Friday I will have them double check for worms. And he will be 7 weeks tomorrow. I originally intended to pick him up when he was 9 weeks for the same reason but the breeder said he was ready for pickup and she needed to meet me this past weekend.
 

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I would just feed a food that has the correct calcium to phosphorus ratio for a growing large-extra large breed puppy. You would have to do a bit of research on it to find the right one but an example would be "Fromm Gold Large Breed Puppy" or an all life stages food with proper calcium to phosphorus. This is way more important than protein and fat to make sure joints grow correctly.

He wasn't "ready for pickup" no matter what the breeder says. Six weeks is too early. Though if they weren't doing a socialization program (which knowledgeable breeders often do) I'm not sure it matters too much in the long run. Doesn't sound like a great breeder anyway. Call me a skeptic but I've found that many of those "accidental" litters of interesting mixed breeds dogs aren't so accidental. I hope they didn't charge very much for them.

Enjoy your puppy now though. Make sure to join a puppy classes and such to help get that extra socialization and training underway. You never know how big he is going to get. :)
 

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I would just feed a food that has the correct calcium to phosphorus ratio for a growing large-extra large breed puppy. You would have to do a bit of research on it to find the right one but an example would be "Fromm Gold Large Breed Puppy" or an all life stages food with proper calcium to phosphorus. This is way more important than protein and fat to make sure joints grow correctly.

He wasn't "ready for pickup" no matter what the breeder says. Six weeks is too early. Though if they weren't doing a socialization program (which knowledgeable breeders often do) I'm not sure it matters too much in the long run. Doesn't sound like a great breeder anyway. Call me a skeptic but I've found that many of those "accidental" litters of interesting mixed breeds dogs aren't so accidental. I hope they didn't charge very much for them.

Enjoy your puppy now though. Make sure to join a puppy classes and such to help get that extra socialization and training underway. You never know how big he is going to get. :)
I have had a hard time figuring out calcium to phosphorus ratio. I know recommended calcium to phosphorus ratio is 1.2% calcium to 1% phosphorus but all that is listed on his dog food is 1.0% ca min. Not sure how to calculate phosphorus into that. Any advice? And yea it did throw me off a bit because she told me he would be ready by the second week into February but then texted me two weeks ago saying he was ready. I did tell her I would not pick him up that week and waited an extra week still thinking he would be 8 weeks until she handed me a card with his DOB. Either way, I had already driven the hour to meet her but will be sure to know the exact age of any future adoption. Thanks for the input on puppy classes I was not familiar with such a thing as amateur as that may sound lol. This is my first time adopting and although I have done a lot of research nothing beats experienced dog owners!
 

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I have had a hard time figuring out calcium to phosphorus ratio. I know recommended calcium to phosphorus ratio is 1.2% calcium to 1% phosphorus but all that is listed on his dog food is 1.0% ca min. Not sure how to calculate phosphorus into that. Any advice? And yea it did throw me off a bit because she told me he would be ready by the second week into February but then texted me two weeks ago saying he was ready. I did tell her I would not pick him up that week and waited an extra week still thinking he would be 8 weeks until she handed me a card with his DOB. Either way, I had already driven the hour to meet her but will be sure to know the exact age of any future adoption. Thanks for the input on puppy classes I was not familiar with such a thing as amateur as that may sound lol. This is my first time adopting and although I have done a lot of research nothing beats experienced dog owners!
Most can be simply Googles to find out the ratio's.
Labs are large breed and Danes a giant breed, so feeding is no real difference while there growing, biggest thing would be to stay away from puppy stage stuff.
At this piont you could be looking at a 50lb dog to a 200lb dog at full maturity, so go by body shape for the amount of feeding.

Start training now.
 

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Breeder who leaves an intact female in the yard and pups go home at six weeks?
 
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