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I have a 1 year old Female Rottie and a my friend has a 2 year old Male Rottie.
Both dogs have AKC pedigree papers and both are in excellent health.
I was actually planning on having my dog spayed this month..
but..
Between our family and friends ..at least a dozen people we know personally would take a puppy from the litter,
and I would also like another Rottie Pup and So would my friend.:wave:

Should I wait (when shes mature) let her have 1 litter..and then have her spayed ?
Not looking to sell the puppies, every puppy would have a place to go with family members and close friends.
 

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Have they had their hips x-rayed and evaluated? Cardiac, thyroid, etc.? I guess these are all the genetic tests Rotts should have: http://www.rottweilerhealth.org/CHIC_reports.htm

What's the working situation in your family? If the mother dog was unable to nurse, would somebody be able to take off work to be with the pups 24/7? Can you afford an emergency c-section? Do you know how to properly socialize puppies so they grow up to be stable dogs?

Also, people who SAY they want a puppy have a tendency to back out at the last second. Especially family and friends. Would you be able to find responsible homes for the pups if your takers did back out? Since it'll be at least a year before she should get pregnant (never breed a dog under 2 years old), they may lose interest by then.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Have they had their hips x-rayed and evaluated? Cardiac, thyroid, etc.? I guess these are all the genetic tests Rotts should have: http://www.rottweilerhealth.org/CHIC_reports.htm

What's the working situation in your family? If the mother dog was unable to nurse, would somebody be able to take off work to be with the pups 24/7? Can you afford an emergency c-section? Do you know how to properly socialize puppies so they grow up to be stable dogs?

Also, people who SAY they want a puppy have a tendency to back out at the last second. Especially family and friends. Would you be able to find responsible homes for the pups if your takers did back out? Since it'll be at least a year before she should get pregnant (never breed a dog under 2 years old), they may lose interest by then.
Thanks for the information!
First , I will look deeper into the health of both our dogs..
The financial situation is not a problem , nor is the concern about placement of puppies and socialization.
 

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Yep Rotties NEED at least to get their hips OFA evaluated which can cost upwards of $200 per dog and also need a cardio exam done on their hearts, they both also need their eyes examined by a certified ophthalmologist. You also need to look into the family history behind your dog and look to see what her grandparents might have died from to see if there is anything back in her genes that could be passed onto the puppies and try and breed away from that issue.
 

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Yep Rotties NEED at least to get their hips OFA evaluated which can cost upwards of $200 per dog and also need a cardio exam done on their hearts, they both also need their eyes examined by a certified ophthalmologist. You also need to look into the family history behind your dog and look to see what her grandparents might have died from to see if there is anything back in her genes that could be passed onto the puppies and try and breed away from that issue.
Thanx !
Thats my main concern...I would like to make sure that the pups they produce are healthy.
 

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Unless you got your dog from a great breeder (in which case you'd likely have a list of things you'd need to do before being allowed to think about breeding) then it's likely better to spay her. If you have a deep need to breed dogs, then spay her, start taking classes and learning, put some titles on her and then start looking for the right pup to do so with. There's more to it than 'she's intact, he's intact, lets have puppies'. Just because your friend has an intact rottie, and even if he had all the clearances and so on and was a great dog, wouldn't mean he'd be the right mate for your dog. You'd need to know her good and bad points and what he's going to add to the mix, and so much more. It works both ways on all of that too.

And if you have lots of people who would 'love' a puppy, that doesn't always mean when the pups are ready to go home they're going to be as eager. Or more importantly that they'd be a good home for a rottie - are they going to take classes, socialize the dogs, keep them when they move/get pregnant/sneeze.... are YOU going to take back a dog in six years for example that has major health issues and pay out of pocket to get the dog healthy and rehome it?

One thing you could do is take those possible puppy people and email them with the suggestion that you will help them find their perfect rescue and then go look. Rotties and pitts and other 'muscle breeds' are often in desparate need of homes everywhere, so your two dogs could 'adopt' puppies out instead. Also consider taking in a pregnant rescued dog and raising the litter, you may find after a few weeks of your house smelling like a dog's bathroom and not sleeping that breeding isn't all cute and fun!
 

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Unless you got your dog from a great breeder (in which case you'd likely have a list of things you'd need to do before being allowed to think about breeding) then it's likely better to spay her. If you have a deep need to breed dogs, then spay her, start taking classes and learning, put some titles on her and then start looking for the right pup to do so with. There's more to it than 'she's intact, he's intact, lets have puppies'. Just because your friend has an intact rottie, and even if he had all the clearances and so on and was a great dog, wouldn't mean he'd be the right mate for your dog. You'd need to know her good and bad points and what he's going to add to the mix, and so much more. It works both ways on all of that too.

And if you have lots of people who would 'love' a puppy, that doesn't always mean when the pups are ready to go home they're going to be as eager. Or more importantly that they'd be a good home for a rottie - are they going to take classes, socialize the dogs, keep them when they move/get pregnant/sneeze.... are YOU going to take back a dog in six years for example that has major health issues and pay out of pocket to get the dog healthy and rehome it?

One thing you could do is take those possible puppy people and email them with the suggestion that you will help them find their perfect rescue and then go look. Rotties and pitts and other 'muscle breeds' are often in desparate need of homes everywhere, so your two dogs could 'adopt' puppies out instead. Also consider taking in a pregnant rescued dog and raising the litter, you may find after a few weeks of your house smelling like a dog's bathroom and not sleeping that breeding isn't all cute and fun!
Im not looking to create "The Master Race of Dogs.."
Nor am I looking to win a "Humanitarian Award.."
 

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Spay. Or at least dont breed.

Its not as easy as putting 2 adult dogs together. Both of these dogs could be in perfect health, tests come back clean. But what if your girls grandma had crap hips (or elbows) and that gets passed to this litter? What if the males great grandpa has heart issues that show up in this litter? If you're going to do it, do it right. Know the history on both dogs and every dog in their lineage. Know what every dog died of, what their test results were. If you cant access that information you're playing russian roulette with these puppies lives. Papers, from any registry, do not indicate quality.
 

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I vote spay too :)
Maybe you could help your friends and family find some really wonderful dogs to adopt at local shelters or breed-specific rescues if they really are serious about wanting a dog. Black dogs have a hard time finding homes! So if they're interested in mixes or dogs like yours, they could really be helping out some dogs in desperate need of a good home.

Or some folks on here may be able to direct them to some well-established and reliable breeders.

There's a thread around here about breeding and how much there really is to it...
here it is:
http://www.dogforums.com/general-dog-forum/46071-so-you-want-breed.html
 

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Im not looking to create "The Master Race of Dogs.."
Nor am I looking to win a "Humanitarian Award.."
In what way would breeding these two dogs improve the breed? What superior qualities do they offer, and what are their faults? Then add the health tests, temperaments, goals, time and money.
 

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NO one said you should create the "Master race of dogs" but if you are not going into this with the intention of making the offspring better than the parents then you are going into this for the wrong reason.
 

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Spay. I'm sure your dog is wonderful and pretty, but unless you are willing to invest in extensive research, time, effort, and a fair amount of expense to breed in an ethical and responsible manner, there is no reason to add her puppies to the overall dog population when there are already so many.
 

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Spay. Just because you've got some AKC papers and a dog that as of YET hasn't had any health problems, doesn't mean it's a good idea to breed them. You need to know the hips, eyes, elbows, thyroid, etc. of the ENTIRE line.
And everyone who said they will take a puppy, probably will not. People ALWAYS say that... and then they think about it and change their mind.
 

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Thing is, frequently all those homes looking to take one of your pups end up backing out once pups are here. Have you and the owner of the male done all relevant health clearances on your dogs (she's too young to OFA) CERF clearances within a year of breeding, have a family history on both dogs of longevity and incidences of cancer? Willing to do brucellosis tests on both dogs? Do you have an experienced mentor to help you through the breeding and whelping process? Did your breeder do these things? Do you have the breeders permission to keep her intact? What do the two dogs have to contribute to the breed? What do you do with them besides just pets? If I couldn't answer these questions with a positive, I'd go ahead and spay. Being registered with AKC, in of itself, is no guarantee of anything or a reason to breed.
 

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And unless all of those people wanting a puppy own their own home, and are financially secure so they won't be needing to rent, then many places do not rent to people with large, or "dangerous" breeds. (Personally, I don't have a problem renting to people with any bred/size dog, but I'm the exception when it comes to landlords). Also, some of those homeowners may have an insurance co that will not insure their home with certain breeds living there. They'd need to check that as well.

I'd vote spay, but if you must breed, get her vet checks done, wait until she is at least 2 yrs old, and make sure the potential stud has his vet checks done.
 

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most likely this dog wasn't from a good breeder to begin with if you did not have a spay/neuter contract..... if they all want rottie pups so bad tell them to go to a good breeder who knows what they are doing, or rescue some. and here is something to think about:

is breeding just because YOU want to have pups fair to her? what if she dies? can you live with that?
 
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