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I'm pretty sure this is an ancient debate, but I'd love to hear experienced dog owners put in their .02 on their preference.

Which gender do you prefer: male or female? Why?

I suppose I'm mostly interested in the training aspect. I've heard rumours that male dogs mark a lot as puppies and can have issues there. I was also told they can be more aggressive. I don't know what is fact or fiction here, so please help me out and share your wisdom!!
 

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Male dogs do mark as puppies. Neutering solves that, I *think*. I've never owned a male dog.

Having said that, females go into heat, so you'll have to deal with the blood from that for a bit until she's spayed.

Neither males nor females are more prone to aggression.

Females tend to be slightly more aloof... they really are bitchier. Males, from what I've heard, are more goofy and more velcro. And, of course, there are always exceptions, yadda yadda. :)
 

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I'll be honest, for me it really depends on breed. I'm unlikely to EVER own another female corgi- they're INCREDIBLY bitchy. But I really prefer collie bitches. And Lizzie's brothers are all MUCH easier-going than she is.

Marking is a training issue- not a gender issue.
 

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You will find that in certain breeds gender can make more of a difference in temperament. But that many times it is more about the individual dog on the large scale.

This is an ancient debate as you say, one that can't really be solved because people will only go on their experiences and personal opinion. I actually just came across an article in one of the dog magazines last month about this. They went to actual trainers and they still got the same mixed answers.

Females are harder to train
Males are harder to train
Females listen better
Males listen better
Females are more protective
Males are more protective

ect,ect

I've never had a problem with male dogs marking a lot as puppies. So I don't believe that one bit. Males usually start marking with maturity so I don't know why they'd do it a lot as pups. Once they reach adulthood you can expect some males to mark. (same with some females) Though mine don't put a lot of effort and time into this.They usually go out and squat then come right back in. Sometimes they will lift their leg, but it is still a one pee spot and not marking everywhere. At times they will find 2 or 3 spots to hit if they are running out and about, so do some of the females. The worst dog I have that actually marks is a female. As long as they are not doing it on anything like patio furniture or something I can't see the problem anyway. It also shouldn't inhibit their training.

As for aggression that is an individual dog thing. It is up to you to make a wise decision when getting a dog and raising the dog properly (or if they are an adult continue with it).

Just to make points here and not to pick on rosemary this is some examples

Male dogs do mark as puppies. Neutering solves that, I *think*. I've never owned a male dog.

Having said that, females go into heat, so you'll have to deal with the blood from that for a bit until she's spayed.

Neither males nor females are more prone to aggression.

Females tend to be slightly more aloof... they really are bitchier. Males, from what I've heard, are more goofy and more velcro. And, of course, there are always exceptions, yadda yadda. :)
I've not had male dogs mark as puppies. Though some males start younger then others with marking and lifting their leg. I can't imagine it'd be common for pups to mark. I have mostly intact dogs and don't actually have a marking problem, but on the same note neutering does not always solve this problem. Especially done later in life because it can be a habit, but even if done young they still might develop it.

I think again the temperament depends on the individual dog and breed. While I have plenty goofy males, I also have goofy females and they certainly qualify as velcro dogs (they don't act aloof at all, so really can't be measured as more aloof). Where I have or have had other dogs which were actually aloof though male and female both. I can't really make a determination that one was more then the other based on male vs female.
 

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Can't really help you as when I was growing up we always have had female dogs. I don't think it was planned that way it was just the way it worked out.

The same goes for the human females in the house. It wasn't planned that way it is just the way it worked out :eek:

Of course that also had it's pluses such as I had my own room for the first 9 years of my life :)
 

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IMHO - the difference is in the organs they are born w/ and that's where it ends. All of the other variables ultimately come down to individuals and end up being more a function of nurture rather than nature.
 

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i have always had male dogs as long as i can remember. actually i have had all male pets except for one ferret, one cat, and one gerbil have been males. for some reason i like the males better. i don't know why. maybe they are cuddlier? i don't know :)

as for the marking...my experience: my friend and i have littermates. iorek was neutered at 6 months and just recently (when he was just over a year old) he has started marking. not really, but he will sometimes pee around the perimeter of the backyard and when we are walking he will lift his leg to some trees. ryder, on the other hand, is not neutered yet, they are about 17 months old. but, he was lifting his leg to trees and such since he was about 5 1/2 months old! he marks everything. i don't know why iorek started this. i guess he is still maturing, which makes me happy because i read that i probably shouldn't have neutered him so early :( i don't know what makes them mark and what doesn't. i do know that my husband is much happier now that iorek is lifting his leg heeheehee! my husband calls him his manly dog now :D (he is not serious, he thinks it is funny!) but it does help because everyone always calls iorek a girl :)
 

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Our mutt bitch marked as much as our males. It was annoying.

I love the boys because they are sweet, smart and easy to train and like to work with you.

I love the girls because they are BRILLIANT, once you figure out how to get into their heads. ;-)

I like them both, really.
 

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I tend to prefer girls. All my personal dogs (actually all my pets period except for fish) have been female. I never planned it that way it just happened. They've all been pretty bitchy and conniving at times, which I love. Summer is probably the nicest of them but she still has her moments. We've had a lot of male dogs owned by the family though too, and I love them all as well. I don't put much thought into gender, just into an individual. It just happens the dogs I've liked have all been female. I have noticed my girls in general seem to put more thought into what they do before they do it, but that could just be a coincidence. Nard may break that trend though, he's a very smart, thoughtful boy.

As far as stereotypes go....

My most velcro dog is a female.

My most aloof dog is a male.

Two of my females mark.

My easiest to train dogs have been one female and two males.

My most protective was a male. (BUT he was also the only guardian breed I've owned)

I can't tell you which have been sweeter. Within my breed now (paps) there isn't much of a difference. I have heard with paps males like to dote on you and females like to be doted upon. That is one I do believe.
 

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I prefer males, but not for any real reason, more that my absolute favorite dog happens to be male. Marking has never been a problem with any of mine, nor has aggression. In most breeds I don't think there are any gender related personality differences.
 

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I had always had females up until my husband insisted that we get a male dog to even out the genders in our house. I will never again get a female dog unless I have a male. Our boys were much easier to raise than any female I have ever had. They listen better and they potty trained much easier. I have a male basenji and a male beagle/dalmation/who knows what else.
 

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I've always preferred males but the few females I have had all ended up being extra special to me. The females I've had seemed to be happier, more energetic, and full of love for life than any of my boys. Each of them could play hard, fight hard, and be up for whatever was at hand. They all seemed more adventerous and fearless on the trails. At home though they all were very close to me, never leaving my side. My 2 GSD females were very much the drama queens though if they got their feelings hurt. They would jump into my arms and cry, 'telling' me all about it until I gave them a hug and told them it was "ok". lol My ACD/Catahoula girl is my 'little mama'. She always watches out for me, at home or on the trail. She is very much like a mom watching out for her baby, me. :p

My girls have been just as goofy and velcro like as the boys. None has been any more aggressive than the other but the girls did seem to be more open to just jump in whatever was going on. Be it a fight or playing. They were always game for any action.

As for the marking thing, all my guys have always marked, but never as puppies, and all but one was neutered. Two of my neutered boys would even tie with females in heat. Ugh, I hated that! Those two were both neutered about 4 months of age. One of my spayed girls would mark over all the boys.

None of my girls has ever been "bitchy" but I have a neutered male that is awfully crabby. So go figure.... :rolleyes:

Oh, I just wanted to add that none seemed any more difficult than the other to train or housebreak. That is with the exception of my ACD/Catahoula mix. Then again I hear the Catahoulas are a bit stubborn anyway. She has never had any housebreaking accidents but when it comes to doing what I say she'll just stand there looking at me, being the last of the gang to respond. Is she being a hard-headed female of just being a Catahoula? I dunno....


Jihad
and the pound puppy crew.
 

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I think I love my males and my females equally, although I have a particular male who is my "heart" dog. From my personal experience, the male TFT stays goofier longer than the female does, but all of them share a fun streak even into maturity. They are equally tenacious and show the terrier assertiveness (with a slight tendency toward dog aggression) and the females show a bit more of a tendency toward same-sex aggression than males do. I've heard it said that "dogs fight for wife; bitches fight for life" and from what I've witnessed with this breed, that's true. The few dog fights that I've had over the years have resulted in wounded feelings and a slight puncture on a hind leg between males and 1) a torn flap of skin in the armpit of one female (in a fight between two girls) and 2) a male with severe puncture wounds to his face, nearing the eye (in a fight between a male and a female. In both cases, the bitches needed to be dunked in water to get them to let go--in the bitch/dog fight, she grabbed onto the dog at the base of the neck and was working her jaws up to his throat at one point. So yeah--both sexes are similar in aggression, but females take their fights much more seriously (in this breed).

In my experience, both sexes like to cuddle and both are trainable. My females have less interest in pleasing me than my males do, which is a shame because they are all incredibly smart. Unfortunately, obedience is only interesting when there is nothing better to do. Males seem to shut down more completely, though, and the "shut down" period can last for months.

I generally don't have more trouble with males marking over females marking or with the discharge that females have when they are in heat. Stud/bitch pants work well in both cases and my TFTs seem to be fastidious about cleaning themselves during their heat cycles.

Written out like this, it does seem that females can be slightly harder to enjoy, at least in this breed, but I wouldn't trade any of the ones that I own for the world. My advice is just to think about what you want from the dog in your future and pick a puppy based on what it seems like it can do, not based on its sex. If you plan to get it spayed or neutered, the sexes are pretty much the same, anyway, in terms of companionship and ease of care.
 
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