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Hi, we have 2 “Boxer” dogs that are 22 months old. We were told they are Boxer when we rescued them from going to the pound at 1 month old. We have never seen the parents but know someone who has and have been assured they are Boxer but I have always wondered but never cared enough to look into it. One (Sadie) has a much longer nose than her sister (Sophie) so I was doing a little research and came across the Bandogge breed….I have never heard of it. Now I am wondering if that is what they might be. Sophie is 85 lbs and Sadie is 76. They are big babies. I will post a picture if someone can tell me how. I’d really to know. Thanks
 

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Cat-dog, GSD spayed female and Tornado-dog, JRT mix, neutered male
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I grew up with a purebred boxer. She was all white, her muzzle was too smushed and broad, her body was too short and broad, her tail was docked too short, and so on. So, a purebred boxer can vary from the standard.

With that, they are most likely a mix. Which is all a "bandogge" is. It is not a breed and it may contain a variety of breeds and still be called a bandogge.

If you want to know, I really recommend doing a dna test.
 

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Purebred dogs can vary quite a bit from their written breed standard if they aren't being bred with much care to their conformation and type. Even within the same litter. So it's possible that the dogs are purebred - or mostly purebred - boxers. It's also possible that they're mixed with any number of other breeds, or even have no boxer at all! Since there can be multiple fathers to the same litter, it's also possible that one sibling is pure and the other is not, or they're both different mixes. Without pictures, it's hard to say either way, and even with pictures it can be extremely challenging to ID a dog's breed mix.

Bandogges are, to my limited knowledge, mastiff mixes specifically bred for sport and work (protection, estate guardians, hog hunting, etc.). While there are all kinds of breeds that can go into a bandog/bandogge, if there isn't a big demand for that kind of working dog in your area, it's more likely that, if they are mixed, they're just a happy accident of a couple local dogs getting together.

A DNA test is your best bet to know for sure, though. Embark is generally considered the best of the best, though Wisdom Panel isn't bad either.
 
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