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If you breed a boxador with a boxer. will the puppies have a chance to be full breed boxers. How does the genetics break down? I think you would end up with a mix of some kind. I was having a discussion with a friend and he was sayin that evey puppie would have a 1 in 4 chance of being full boxer. what do you think?
 

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If you breed a boxador with a boxer. will the puppies have a chance to be full breed boxers. How does the genetics break down? I think you would end up with a mix of some kind. I was having a discussion with a friend and he was sayin that evey puppie would have a 1 in 4 chance of being full boxer. what do you think?
No, you're right. They'd be mixes just 3/4ths boxer and 1/4 lab. Purebreds have to have generations of purebred parents.
 

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By the assumptions in his math, a breeding of a boxer to a lab would result in pups with a 50 / 50 chance of being pure (boxer or lab). But this isn't how the genetics works. 50% of the DNA is going to come from mom, 50% from dad. In the original example, parent 1 gives his 50% boxer and 50% lab. parent 2 gives 100% boxer, for a final breakdown of exactly the 3/4, 1/4 Laurelin already posted.
 

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Boxador is not a breed, they are a cross bred dog of Boxer/Lab but that doesn't mean that they are half Boxer and half Lab. I often hear people say that they have a half one breed half another breed, but genetics doesn't work like that. I see wolf hybrids also advertised as being a certain % wolf but the breeder themselves can't really know this. Since dogs within the same litter can have varying amount of wolf genes. However breeding a Boxer/Lab mix to a Boxer doesn't create pure bred Boxers either. They will still be Boxer and Lab mixes. You can breed out the Lab over time or Lab traits, but it takes generations and DNA testing would also be helpful to know what the dogs are genetically and not just how they look.
 

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If you breed a boxador with a boxer . . .
And if you ever decide to do that, or hear about anyone else doing it, PLEASE don't mention it on dogforums (for your own safety.)
 

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Boxador is not a breed, they are a cross bred dog of Boxer/Lab but that doesn't mean that they are half Boxer and half Lab. I often hear people say that they have a half one breed half another breed, but genetics doesn't work like that. I see wolf hybrids also advertised as being a certain % wolf but the breeder themselves can't really know this. Since dogs within the same litter can have varying amount of wolf genes. However breeding a Boxer/Lab mix to a Boxer doesn't create pure bred Boxers either. They will still be Boxer and Lab mixes. You can breed out the Lab over time or Lab traits, but it takes generations and DNA testing would also be helpful to know what the dogs are genetically and not just how they look.
Spicy, yes it does work that way--to a point. If you have a Labrador parent and a Boxer parent, each dog contributes 50% of any given puppy's genetic material. However, the temperament and various characteristics may resemble one parent or another, based on which is dominant (such as short hair over long hair and dominant tan over recessive black or whatever). You can most definitely say that a wolf cross is genetically x% of a wolf and x% of a dog: if you've bred a 50-50 wolf-dog hybrid to a 100% do, then you know you have 75% genetic material from the dog--HOWEVER--that does not mean that the 75% dog mix will be any less wolf-like than the 50% hybrid, if that is the animal that raised the pups.

I *think* it takes 10 generations for a mix to be bred out and be "pure" by percentage; however, recessive genes can be carried for a looooong time without ever showing. I've heard estimates of between 10 and 15 generations. Don't quote me on the number of generations, but when there was an attempt to save the Dusky Seaside Sparrow many years ago, they were considering 97.5% DSS birds to be essentially pure by characteristics.
 

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And if you ever decide to do that, or hear about anyone else doing it, PLEASE don't mention it on dogforums (for your own safety.)

LOL No kidding! That would be suicide. lol
 

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Spicy, yes it does work that way--to a point. If you have a Labrador parent and a Boxer parent, each dog contributes 50% of any given puppy's genetic material. However, the temperament and various characteristics may resemble one parent or another, based on which is dominant (such as short hair over long hair and dominant tan over recessive black or whatever). You can most definitely say that a wolf cross is genetically x% of a wolf and x% of a dog: if you've bred a 50-50 wolf-dog hybrid to a 100% do, then you know you have 75% genetic material from the dog--HOWEVER--that does not mean that the 75% dog mix will be any less wolf-like than the 50% hybrid, if that is the animal that raised the pups.

I *think* it takes 10 generations for a mix to be bred out and be "pure" by percentage; however, recessive genes can be carried for a looooong time without ever showing. I've heard estimates of between 10 and 15 generations. Don't quote me on the number of generations, but when there was an attempt to save the Dusky Seaside Sparrow many years ago, they were considering 97.5% DSS birds to be essentially pure by characteristics.
Huh? That doesn't even make sense. So if my domesticated dog is raised by a wolf hybrid then they will be as much wolf as the wolf hybrid? The dog is what it is, the genetics remain the same. That doesn't change by who raises the pup.

Yeah I know recessive can be carried for a long time. I'm not arguing anything about recessive genes. Dominant and recessive are really important things to consider, including in crosses. You can get throwbacks in a pure bred dog from a bloodline that they only carry 1/8th of pedigree wise. A lot of people don't consider that and think 1/8th is meaningless and doesn't contribute to their dog. Most to agree on the 10 generations being considered pure. If your goal is to breed some other breed out or add in something and keep that trait then it would be done very selectively. If it is done without proper selection you can still end up with the undesirable traits of the other breeds even though your dogs are now considered "pure".
 

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Huh? That doesn't even make sense. So if my domesticated dog is raised by a wolf hybrid then they will be as much wolf as the wolf hybrid? The dog is what it is, the genetics remain the same. That doesn't change by who raises the pup.
That's not what I said: re-read it please. What I said was that the 75% dog would not be any less "wolf-like" if the 50% hybrid raised the pups. That makes perfect sense: nurture has a lot to do with temperament and, if the wolf-hybrid is presumed to have the wolf-like temperament (as they often do), then its pups will possible have a similar temperament. I said nothing about the genetics being affected, only that the temperament would be influenced by what was learned in puppyhood. Dogs learn by example, for the most part.
 

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That's not what I said: re-read it please. What I said was that the 75% dog would not be any less "wolf-like" if the 50% hybrid raised the pups. That makes perfect sense: nurture has a lot to do with temperament and, if the wolf-hybrid is presumed to have the wolf-like temperament (as they often do), then its pups will possible have a similar temperament. I said nothing about the genetics being affected, only that the temperament would be influenced by what was learned in puppyhood. Dogs learn by example, for the most part.
...in theory anyway...when talking about wolfdogs..its a little different...where is TJ when I need him..he can splain better than me...
 

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Yes I know pups learn from their dam and early imprint. You didn't explain what you meant. You only said they wouldn't be less wolf like. I can't just assume to determine what any less wolf like means in the post. It could mean physical traits and build, temperament, thought process. Even genetically speaking, but if not it could still be be any one of the previous mentioned or more.

Early nurture is not the major factor in a lot of pups, wolf hybrids included. You could have a hybrid raised by dog that still acts very wolf like. If the dam is the wolf hybrid then they have the mtDNA from the wolf and nDNA from the wolf and nDNA from the dog sire. There is a number of ways these pups can turn out. I don't presume that there is any definitive way of knowing how a pup will act or be more or less like. Nurture is only one part of it, genetics can play a big role and latter nurture once away from the dam can also have its part or other experiences while with the dam. We could cite instances for either side. For the record I'm not saying nurture would impact them.

I did re-read it and no where was it stated they might have a more of a wolf temperament nor that they wouldn't have any less of a wolf temperament.
 

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Spicy, it would be easier to understand your argument if you didn't fall back on jargon.

Edited to add
btw, you're straining at gnats and picking apart my statement. I should have said "in behavior," but it might have been concluded by the reader what I meant due to context. If not, then I apologize, but I'm not accustomed to people picking apart every post by every word. I'll try to do better next time.
 
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