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Hello,

My family has put a deposit down on a Bluetick Coonhound to join our family as a pet. I did the research going in, but I am not second guessing our decision. Has anyone had success having this breed as a pet?

We are nervous about their natural urge to take off. We currently have a Black and Tan mix that is extremely well trained off leash and will respond to our call if he begins to chase a bunny etc. The last thing I want to do is have our dog take off and get hit, or not be able to give the dog what he needs.

Any advice welcomed.
 

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My dog is likely part Bluetick Coonhound. When young they have a LOT of energy and they absolutely need firm structure. They are the kind of dog that if you give them an inch, they take a mile!馃槀 They are very smart, but won't always care what you want, so training can be challenging. My dog is very food driven though, so training him hasn't been too difficult with most things, but he hates repetition. Are you getting a puppy? I have had success off-leash training my lab puppy I had a long time ago from a young age by letting her run around the yard with me without a leash, and every time they try to wander off, immediately go and bring them back. They learn pretty quickly not to go far. Well, until they become six months old and that teenage stage hits. 馃ぃ
 

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It is a breed that are bred to hunt, it鈥檚 a distinctive hunting dog that have a high need for hunting. If not used for hunting you should at least engage in activities like tracking trials and/or field trials. They need to be allowed to work and do what they鈥檙e bred for.

If you can鈥檛 offer that, then it鈥檚 not the right breed to get. What are you planning on doing with the dog?
 

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Coonhounds can make great pets if you are willing to put in the work. Start recall and "no chasing things" training as soon as you get them home. This is a good self study workshop that can help with that. Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - WP540: Cars, Cats, and Kangaroos 鈥 DON鈥橳 CHASE THAT!! Just be aware that some dogs simply cannot ever be trusted off-lead outside of a safely controlled environment, no matter how much training they have.

Also, giving them an outlet for their innate hunting skills is important. Training them in tracking, blood tracking, shed hunting, or nosework are all good options. Nosework is probably the most accessible, since all you need to start with are some scented swabs, a tin to hold them, some boxes, food, and a puppy. This online class Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - N101S: NW101 - Introduction to Nosework starts August 1st, and enrollment opens today.
 

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It is a breed that are bred to hunt, it鈥檚 a distinctive hunting dog that have a high need for hunting. If not used for hunting you should at least engage in activities like tracking trials and/or field trials. They need to be allowed to work and do what they鈥檙e bred for.

If you can鈥檛 offer that, then it鈥檚 not the right breed to get. What are you planning on doing with the dog?
We do a lot of outdoor activities, but no hunting, trials, etc. In all of my research, there are mixed messages. Some say with good excercise and attention they can be great house pets. We only have half acre and it is not fenced. Our B&T mix is great offleash so that is not an issue at this point.
 

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We do a lot of outdoor activities, but no hunting, trials, etc. In all of my research, there are mixed messages. Some say with good excercise and attention they can be great house pets. We only have half acre and it is not fenced. Our B&T mix is great offleash so that is not an issue at this point.
I wouldn't count on being able to safely allow the dog off leash. This pretty much goes for ANY dog. So if not being bale to let the dog out in the yard with no fence and no leash is a deal breaker, then you may reconsider getting any dog at all. You're lucky enough with your current dog but there's no way to guarantee the new dog will be reliable enough for that. They almost definitely won't be as a puppy/young adult, and may never be as an adult. Especially since you are going with a breed not well known for wanting to work closely with it's handler. They can make excellent pets, there is nothing wrong with the breed, but wanting a dog guaranteed to be off leash safe, the breed might not be your best bet. You may want to consider a herding breed dog instead.
 

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Never had a bluetick, but we had a Plott hound for about twelve years. (If you don't know Plotts, here's a good read: The Plott hound, the ninja warrior of dogdom. )

For the first couple years, she was a challenge. (That's being generous.) Among other things, she would bolt at any opportunity. Not intentionally but she had too many opportunities. 15 minutes after she disappeared I'd get a call - often from a couple miles away and across the river.

Something clicked after about three years and she matured into an excellent, loyal family dog. I'd say it was worth it and my family would probably agree, but those first few years were pretty rough.
 

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We do a lot of outdoor activities, but no hunting, trials, etc. In all of my research, there are mixed messages. Some say with good excercise and attention they can be great house pets. We only have half acre and it is not fenced. Our B&T mix is great offleash so that is not an issue at this point.
You should know that whilst your only dog now might be not an issue off leash, when your new pup arives that will possibly / probably change. Two dogs together will bond and get into mischief - one will become the leader and off they will go.
It would be nice to think your older dog will become that leader and the pup will follow its lead ..... but without fences, it's a big risk and a huge worry when they go "walkabout" not knowing where they are and when they'll come home and if they're safe.
We have 2 golden retrievers and they're naughty..... even digging under our fences to get out - always when we weren't in attendance. So we had to hot-wire the fence - the only way to stop it. It was low voltage so no harm, just a jolt when they touched it. Haven't had to have it on for years now as just the sight of the wire is enough to deter them. Even on off-leash walks in the bush, when they get a whiff of a wild thing, unless I get on them within 10 feet, with 2 of them their recall is pretty well zero.
Good luck.
 

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So we had to hot-wire the fence - the only way to stop it. It was low voltage so no harm, just a jolt when they touched it. Haven't had to have it on for years now as just the sight of the wire is enough to deter them.
It's interesting that anyone who has been around both dogs and horses would agree that dogs are smarter (okay, most people, the vast majority of us). Yet I've often heard that once dogs learn a wire is hot, it can be left off and they never go near it again. In contrast, horses run a whisker over electric fence regularly, and as soon as it's off, so are they.
 

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It's interesting that anyone who has been around both dogs and horses would agree that dogs are smarter (okay, most people, the vast majority of us). Yet I've often heard that once dogs learn a wire is hot, it can be left off and they never go near it again. In contrast, horses run a whisker over electric fence regularly, and as soon as it's off, so are they.
Bahaha! We had to wire our pool gate because of our poodle, he knows not to cross it now, even when its off.. yet I have a hurt horse every once in awhile because those idiots will test boundaries 24/7, If its off, they will find out, and they will be gone..
 
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