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All good points. All I can do is sympathize. I have an Aussie and she's just like your pup. Almost 6 months old. Batpoop insane when I get home after working all day. She's getting better now. I make her grab a toy and we tug and that seems to take the edge off. I also have plenty of raw meaty bones to keep her occupied on days when I cannot deal with her. Keeps her occupied for a good 2-3 hours if it's a nice beef neck bone. It is a really good way of dispensing energy!
 

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I wish i could do that but Lincoln's system is too sensitive for raw (yay me LOL) Dio can handle it well, though.

My hours are more flexible now since I 'technically' work for myself (in the eyes of the IRS), but when I worked as an assistant trainer to race horses, I was pulling 7 days a week from 5am-4pm every day with an hour lunch in between, so I get being tired to not wanting to "deal" with a hyper dog LOL. when they first came out, I bought myself a chuck it and it was the best thing I ever did!

But like I said, mental work is just as important as physical.
 

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I wish i could do that but Lincoln's system is too sensitive for raw (yay me LOL) Dio can handle it well, though.

My hours are more flexible now since I 'technically' work for myself (in the eyes of the IRS), but when I worked as an assistant trainer to race horses, I was pulling 7 days a week from 5am-4pm every day with an hour lunch in between, so I get being tired to not wanting to "deal" with a hyper dog LOL. when they first came out, I bought myself a chuck it and it was the best thing I ever did!

But like I said, mental work is just as important as physical.
It's actually mental work as well (when they chew bones) :) I dunno if you listened to the Sarah Stremming podcasts that we were all talking about on FB, but she actually talks about how it's great for dealing with overarousal and excitement :)
 

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I honestly think walks don't tire out adolescent dogs at all.
Yeah I agree with this, particularly for high-energy breeds.

Have you considered doggy daycare? It did wonders for our dog. I'm not sure how herding breeds do in daycare though.
 

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It's actually mental work as well (when they chew bones) :) I dunno if you listened to the Sarah Stremming podcasts that we were all talking about on FB, but she actually talks about how it's great for dealing with overarousal and excitement :)
Yes Dio loves his chicken feet, ribs, etc LOL ... Lincoln is fine with his benebones, etc ... thank god, since he can't get raw at all (unless I want to clean up a HUGE mess).

Yeah I agree with this, particularly for high-energy breeds.

Have you considered doggy daycare? It did wonders for our dog. I'm not sure how herding breeds do in daycare though.
LOL nope, they dont, not unless they are off lead, I am lucky enough to have a place where I can do that, I know not everyone is that lucky, though.
 

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All the cattle dogs at my kennel were nonstop energy. Most of them had very good temperaments in that if another dog refused to play they'd move on to the next dog...and the next dog...and the next dog...and me...until someone paid attention to them. For 5 hours. Even if there were two cattle dogs to entertain each other, they would play rough and slam each other into the walls all day and not stop until they were kenneled.

The ones who weren't cool with other dogs, the owners already knew and had them be solo. I used to do tricks with them for the 10 minute sessions I had them, or I'd do tunnels and weave poles (if it was available; we also had a training center w/ an agility ring). They never really get "tired." They're natural athletes.

Anyway trying to tire these dogs out is a losing battle. You can try cueing them up for what you want to be doing - if you've got to work on your computer for a bit just give them a cue like "I'm busy" or "Not now" and then ignore your dog. Then when you're ready you say, "Game on" or "wanna play?" Works with Rogue, who's an australian shepherd with unlimited energy. His "wanna play" triggers a zoomie every time.

seriously just put these dogs on a wheel and we've got a solution to all of our energy problems. ;)
 

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Yeah I agree with this, particularly for high-energy breeds.

Have you considered doggy daycare? It did wonders for our dog. I'm not sure how herding breeds do in daycare though.
I've found german shpeherds are the least appropriate and cattle dogs tend to be better. Mostly because GSDs like to put their big ol' mouths on other dog's faces and even if they're gentle as can be and don't do any harm at all, most dogs understandably do not enjoy that. Also noticed a lot of them just get really stressed out in those situations.

If we had a small herder we almost always had to put them with the big dog group because the big dogs are more secure with endless energy zooming around all day.

I had a repeat visit from a bouvier who would mostly yell at other dogs and then come back to me like, "Did I do a good job?!" But she was also really old.

I had a couple of Berger Picards and one of them could get protective of staff if handled incorrectly. I would kennel him at the first sign of protectiveness and he pretty quickly learned that wasn't gonna fly with me. He would usually ignore other dogs except a few he really liked and one puppy he apparently didn't like. He started getting kind of clingy with me and if there wasn't a dog he usually liked to play with he'd come cuddle instead. The other dog was younger and more high strung. Got along really great with some older dogs (like the bouvier! He loved the bouvier) but also had a few dogs who wouldn't tolerate him, ever. And a few dogs he wouldn't tolerate ever. So I'd say that breed in particular is really selective.

We had a beauceron who we briefly tried in group but we quickly decided she was too hard to handle - it wasn't doable to keep track of her and the other dogs so she got the boot. She had been playing with a coworker's foster dog individually (they were getting a 20 minute playtime together) and they would just slam each other against the floor until it was time to go.

Australian shepherds...we mostly got really old ones but we had one puppy who would come in and basically get every dog really excited and pumped up. She only played with dogs who wanted to play so it was fine but it was a little nervewracking with how rough she played. Very toothy, very full-on. She also came in with an older dog who would "correct" her every time she started playing with teeth by grabbing her by the scruff and making her lay down. But then the older one would get tired and she would still have infinite energy to cause mischief.

Cattle dogs like being slammed against the wall repeatedly. We had no less than a dozen new cattle dogs and all of them would get slammed against the wall at some point and even scratch themselves doing it.

I had some sort of border collie/aussie mix come in who was very stressed out every time, didn't really like being handled...then one day we get this pit bull who's got a great personality, total therapy dog, and she spends 40 minutes hanging out with the bc/aussie and licking her lips, mock-mouthing on her feet, all that stuff dogs do to shy dogs when they're trying to say 'hey dude it's cool you wanna go sniff butts with me?'...and then something clicks and bc/aussie wants to play. She spends the rest of group slamming her butt into the pit bull and dancing on her hind legs around like an idiot. The next morning, I come in and bc/aussie is slamming her butt against every dog she can find until they play with her, then she plays until they get tired and go walk away, then she finds a new dog...anyway she tired out all of the other dogs in about an hour. I even took a picture of all of my dogs sleeping in the corner to avoid having to play with her again. Bc/aussie even made the old dogs who just sleep all group play.

I notice that when herding breeds have good social skills they tend to lean more towards allowing other dogs to chase and tackle them rather than the other way around. Best case scenario they end up like BC/aussie where they're so incredibly goofy that the other dogs are more tired than bothered and worst case scenario they end up screaming at other dogs or guarding the kennel tech (ie me) or other dogs will try to "correct" their bad manners.

So I wouldn't say cattle dogs are "bad" in dog parks and daycamp but I would say you'll want to take the way your dog plays into account before considering either. If your dog plays with strange dogs by mouthing on them they may not appreciate it.
 

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Wow, sorry I went M.I.A on you guys, work got EXTREMELY busy here. But I am just overwhelmed (in the best possible way) with all these wonderful responses! I have taken the time to read each and every one and have taken every suggestion into account. Thank you all!
 

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I've found german shpeherds are the least appropriate and cattle dogs tend to be better. Mostly because GSDs like to put their big ol' mouths on other dog's faces and even if they're gentle as can be and don't do any harm at all, most dogs understandably do not enjoy that. Also noticed a lot of them just get really stressed out in those situations.
Every GSD I have known from "pet" or show lines has been the biggest squish with other dogs, my smaller herders will run over most pet or show line GSD. The working lines are tough as nails and no nonsense, they IME they have little patience or time for shenanigans.

I had a couple of Berger Picards and one of them could get protective of staff if handled incorrectly. I would kennel him at the first sign of protectiveness and he pretty quickly learned that wasn't gonna fly with me. He would usually ignore other dogs except a few he really liked and one puppy he apparently didn't like. He started getting kind of clingy with me and if there wasn't a dog he usually liked to play with he'd come cuddle instead. The other dog was younger and more high strung. Got along really great with some older dogs (like the bouvier! He loved the bouvier) but also had a few dogs who wouldn't tolerate him, ever. And a few dogs he wouldn't tolerate ever. So I'd say that breed in particular is really selective.
I like Picards, they are cute little dogs but you're right, very police like LOL.


Australian shepherds...we mostly got really old ones but we had one puppy who would come in and basically get every dog really excited and pumped up. She only played with dogs who wanted to play so it was fine but it was a little nervewracking with how rough she played. Very toothy, very full-on. She also came in with an older dog who would "correct" her every time she started playing with teeth by grabbing her by the scruff and making her lay down. But then the older one would get tired and she would still have infinite energy to cause mischief.
This basically explains my two guys, they have no stop, there is no such thing as tired, I dont think they even know what that is haha!

Cattle dogs like being slammed against the wall repeatedly. We had no less than a dozen new cattle dogs and all of them would get slammed against the wall at some point and even scratch themselves doing it.
My ACD was very no nonsense, she really didnt like to play and had little patience for idiot dogs LOL

I had some sort of border collie/aussie mix come in who was very stressed out every time, didn't really like being handled...then one day we get this pit bull who's got a great personality, total therapy dog, and she spends 40 minutes hanging out with the bc/aussie and licking her lips, mock-mouthing on her feet, all that stuff dogs do to shy dogs when they're trying to say 'hey dude it's cool you wanna go sniff butts with me?'...and then something clicks and bc/aussie wants to play. She spends the rest of group slamming her butt into the pit bull and dancing on her hind legs around like an idiot. The next morning, I come in and bc/aussie is slamming her butt against every dog she can find until they play with her, then she plays until they get tired and go walk away, then she finds a new dog...anyway she tired out all of the other dogs in about an hour. I even took a picture of all of my dogs sleeping in the corner to avoid having to play with her again. Bc/aussie even made the old dogs who just sleep all group play.

I notice that when herding breeds have good social skills they tend to lean more towards allowing other dogs to chase and tackle them rather than the other way around. Best case scenario they end up like BC/aussie where they're so incredibly goofy that the other dogs are more tired than bothered and worst case scenario they end up screaming at other dogs or guarding the kennel tech (ie me) or other dogs will try to "correct" their bad manners.

So I wouldn't say cattle dogs are "bad" in dog parks and daycamp but I would say you'll want to take the way your dog plays into account before considering either. If your dog plays with strange dogs by mouthing on them they may not appreciate it.
My aussie is both, he loves to chase and tackle and loves TO be chased and tackled. Dio, the pumi ... ehhh ... less so. He likes to chase and be chased, but hates to rough house and gets offended by it and he has a temper, so I have to watch him.
 

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I think the issue with GSDs was mostly that they scared the other dogs more than that they were really acting all that badly...like I said, they were putting no pressure down when trying to play, very gentle....just that the other dogs weren't accepting of it and they wouldn't always take the hint. Also think that because GSDs are so popular, more dogs have seen badly behaved and aggressive ones and maybe are a little soured on the concept of a very large pointy dog putting its teeth on their face (even gently)
 

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Hey, everyone.

A bit of backstory: I recently moved to Southwest Colorado and adopted a blue heeler pup named Henry. I’ve had him since he was about 8 weeks old – he is six months now. He is overall a wonderful dog. He knows a lot of tricks, is fully housebroken & crate trained, and has pretty good recall for his age.

My problem: I live alone with Henry and work full-time, as many do. I try and walk him for an hour or two every day before work, unless the weather is bad, in which case we play inside. It is currently winter, so although Colorado has many nice trails to hike, we really cannot take advantage of that right now with all the snow and freezing rain we’ve had. I try to keep him mentally stimulated as well and we often work on new tricks. I also just started puppy obedience classes with him. It is worth noting that I do not have a fenced in yard and I am renting.

It is just never enough. I knew that heelers had a LOT of energy, but this is nuts. I’m sort of at my wits end. When I do crate him to go to work, he’s a madman after. He runs circles in my apartment and play bites way too hard, which I’m trying to break him of. The only thing that truly tires him out is the dog park, and I pretty much refuse to go there because a lot of dog owners are unbelievably irresponsible and bring aggressive dogs. It is always a tense situation and I have no desire to go back.
With it being winter, he is just not getting enough exercise and he has cabin fever.

I’m getting discouraged and feel very overwhelmed, which in turn makes me easily lose my patience with him. This is my first dog (I had dogs growing up, but now I live away from home) and I want to make this work! My parents have told me to just rehome him because I’m in over my head, but I don’t want to do that. I’m proud of him, overall, because he isn’t a bad dog. But I feel like a bad owner. Today when I let him out to pee during my lunch break, he play bit me in the face. That’s a big no. I reprimanded him, but then felt bad because it is my fault. He should be exercised better, but I just don’t know how.

Please, does anyone have any suggestions? Henry is nonstop, 24/7. If I didn’t crate him, I swear he wouldn’t sleep. Help!
 

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Hey, everyone.

A bit of backstory: I recently moved to Southwest Colorado and adopted a blue heeler pup named Henry. I’ve had him since he was about 8 weeks old – he is six months now. He is overall a wonderful dog. He knows a lot of tricks, is fully housebroken & crate trained, and has pretty good recall for his age.

My problem: I live alone with Henry and work full-time, as many do. I try and walk him for an hour or two every day before work, unless the weather is bad, in which case we play inside. It is currently winter, so although Colorado has many nice trails to hike, we really cannot take advantage of that right now with all the snow and freezing rain we’ve had. I try to keep him mentally stimulated as well and we often work on new tricks. I also just started puppy obedience classes with him. It is worth noting that I do not have a fenced in yard and I am renting.

It is just never enough. I knew that heelers had a LOT of energy, but this is nuts. I’m sort of at my wits end. When I do crate him to go to work, he’s a madman after. He runs circles in my apartment and play bites way too hard, which I’m trying to break him of. The only thing that truly tires him out is the dog park, and I pretty much refuse to go there because a lot of dog owners are unbelievably irresponsible and bring aggressive dogs. It is always a tense situation and I have no desire to go back.
With it being winter, he is just not getting enough exercise and he has cabin fever.

I’m getting discouraged and feel very overwhelmed, which in turn makes me easily lose my patience with him. This is my first dog (I had dogs growing up, but now I live away from home) and I want to make this work! My parents have told me to just rehome him because I’m in over my head, but I don’t want to do that. I’m proud of him, overall, because he isn’t a bad dog. But I feel like a bad owner. Today when I let him out to pee during my lunch break, he play bit me in the face. That’s a big no. I reprimanded him, but then felt bad because it is my fault. He should be exercised better, but I just don’t know how.

Please, does anyone have any suggestions? Henry is nonstop, 24/7. If I didn’t crate him, I swear he wouldn’t sleep. Help!
I lived in a mobile park (has to be on a chain when outside) when I brought my blue heeler home at 6 weeks. I would sit on the floor and throw a ball from one end of the trailer to another for as long as he wanted to play. I took him for walks everyday in all weather types. I also worked on training him on a daily basis. YES, my time became his time. Have patience and love your pet. Because it is all worth it. My blue heeler is now 4 years old and he is amazing. We love eachother unconditionally.
 
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