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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all, really hoping we could get some help from people if possible :)

Me and my husband have a 5 month old doberman pup, we love her to pieces but we're having a rough time with her in certain aspects.
We knew what to expect with the doberman, and i work in a vets also, shes well taken care of.. But we cannot stop her from biting.

She is teetheing i know, but this isnt just a bit of mouthing, this is full on clamping down on us, we are scarred from her biting.
We have been and still are in puppy classes and we've done everything they've told us to try, from yelping, to growling and pInning her down till she calms down, pushing her away, walking out of the room, shaking a tin of coins at her. She cares about none of it and comes back full force biting each time, its like she gets in a frenzy.

All other times shes a good girl (besides recall but we're still working on that), shes a lovely dog, affectionate, really cute its just atleast afew times a day she does is...
We have no idea what to do with her, we have bought her so many toys its shocking lol we always have afew different shapes and textures available but she doesnt divert her attention from us for long.
Ay advice would be very appreciated.
Thanks very much.
 

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Please don't pin her down, that will most likely just make her scared and feel threatened and will degrade your relationship with her in the long run.
Pushing her away is probably a bad idea too as she will see it as an invitation to play and biting is a part of puppy play.

You need to stay calm so you don't work her into a frenzy. As calm as you can be when she bites say owe or oops to mark the bad behaviour and stand up. Turn around, and remove your attention from her. If she continues to snap calmly walk into another room and close the door. Wait about 20-30 seconds and return to her. If she continues to snap then leave the room again.

It sounds like she has a lot of extra energy so you may need to increase her exercise. How many walks is she getting a day? Does she know fetch? Get her playing some active games to burn off her extra energy.

Here's a video from kikopup about teaching your puppy a proper alternative behaviour to biting:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c77--cCHPyU&feature=plcp&context=C4491a7cVDvjVQa1PpcFORisFDwDzm9jPoX7H8jk1oRNfS8AluODE=
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi gally, thanks for your reply, i appreciate it.
We knew with dobes they like mental aswell as physical stimulation so we constantly play "find it" games with her. She gets half hour walk in the morning, an hour walk early afternoon then another hour and a half later in the evening.

I understand the pinning thing wasnt good now, but it was only ever if she wouldnt stop and drew blood, and even then she was defnately not afraid of us atall, we dont do that now though.
We always do the wslking away thing when she bites, yelping gets no response from her and when you walk away she goes viciously for your feet or pants, we do close the door and walk back in later also, she does stop biting after afew attempts but once we are relaxed again she seems to go back into biting each time, i will have to just stick with that do you think?
 

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I agree that you just need to stick with it. You've tried a lot of different things: the can of pennies, pinning, yelping, growling, pushing her away, and all in a short period of time, relatively speaking. That is just confusing to the pup. By the time it starts sinking in to her, you've moved on and started something new, so she never really fully understands. And, that's the point, right, you don't want to just stop her from biting right at that particular second, do you? You want her to stop biting period, right? So, you're teaching her, not just trying to stop the biting for the moment. And, in order to teach, you have to give her a chance to understand.

If the yelping gets no response, either two things are happening: you either aren't yelping right at the instant she bites (kind of a delayed reaction), OR it's not loud or firm enough to make her stop for a split second. Yelping sometimes excites an excited dog even more, so try a different noise: "ouch!!" loudly/firmly but not angrily, or "oops!!" And, stick with it.

It took our older dog 4 weeks to get it. It's a hassle, and my fiance HATED that he had to keep leaving the room in the evenings when we played with the pup, because it cut into his TV time, but, eventually it worked.
Our younger dog took one and a half weeks, and the foster pup we have now, about 3 weeks.
 

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She is teetheing i know, but this isnt just a bit of mouthing, this is full on clamping down on us, we are scarred from her biting.
Welcome to owning a doberman puppy, lol.

We have been and still are in puppy classes and we've done everything they've told us to try, from yelping, to growling and pinning her down till she calms down, pushing her away, walking out of the room, shaking a tin of coins at her. She cares about none of it and comes back full force biting each time, its like she gets in a frenzy.
First, stop this.
When you yelp do you just yelp or do you do more?
With my puppy I would yelp loudly and end all play for 10-60 seconds. I wouldn't look at him, I wouldn't talk to him, and if he tried to play more I'd just turn away. Dobermans are smart and puppies just want to play. My boy understood pretty quickly that biting meant all the fun ended. If you need to talk all toys out of the room so she can't just start playing with other things then do so but jeeze, don't pin your dog down.
 

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What is happening just before she bites? Are you playing with her or does it happen out of the blue? If it happened when you are playing, she might think it is just part of the game, so you need to avoid wrestling, tug of war, or chase games that can get her overexcited and lead to nipping by the puppy. You could also also try saying 'no' very firmly, give her a little treat immediately she stops, then have a chew toy ready for her
 

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I agree. I've heard about the pinning down technique, and it hadn't work for the dog of someone I know. I had nothing to offer. But I hope you'll find an effective way to control your pet.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Firstly to clarify on the pinning thing.. We didnt push her to the ground or anything, we would hold her in our arms like a firm cuddle until she calms down.
Like i said, we knew what to expect in terms of excitement and energy but never had this biting issue with a dog before. Youre possibly right that we didnt give her quite enough time with some techiques but alot of the things we tried were in 1 or 2 situations when the message just would not get through.

Yeah with the yelping, i seem to sometimes be able to make the right noise that makes her stop and look at me, but my husband cannot and therefore we cannot be consistent with that, and also she gets to a point where she thinks im a squeeky toy i think.

We dont play tug of war with her, we knew from the beginning that would give her the wrong impression and any toys she has we will sit with in our lap or throw for her.
We will have to continue walking out i think, and hope she eventually gets it, but we cant really put her anywhere as a time out, as the kitchen area is hers (we have a large kitchen and she has free run of it, but she loves it in there) so when we put her in the kitchen it isnt punishment.

Like i said, shes generally a good girl but this is the only real problem. Also i think the problem stems from the breeder giving her to us at 7 weeks, she didnt have time to learn bite inhibition due to this. (the breeder told us she would be over 8 wks).
Thanks for the advice we're getting we appreciate it.
 

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I agree with what everyone has already said. Read the Sticky: The Bite Stops Here in the new owner section.

Here are some tweaks that may help, I wrote this for someone previously....

As already suggested, Rather than yelping, try saying Ouch! or Oops!. What you need is a word to mark the nipping in addition to ignoring him:

Note the 3 days and the apology....


1. When the pup bites, then yelp. It should sound about like what the pup does when you step on its paw... don't step on his paw for a sample :). When you yelp, the pup should startle briefly and stop nipping. Praise and pet. He'll bite.
2. When he bites the second time, Yelp. When he stops, praise and pet. He'll nip again, although it may be a little gentler. ...
3. When he bites a third time, Yelp (see a pattern?). But this time, turn your back for 15 - 30 secs. If he comes around and play bows or barks, then that is an apology. This is important. Accept it, praise and pet... and cringe in expectation of the next nip...
4. When he bites the 4th time, Yelp, then leave the area, placing him in a 2 min. time-out. It is better if you can leave, rather than moving him. Then, return and interact. (He's still hungry...)
5. When he nips the fifth time, yelp, and leave the area, stopping interaction for now.

Pups need to sleep over night in order to learn their lessons. So, keep doing this for 3 days. By the third day, you should notice signficant Bite Inhibition. He may still nip, but it will be softer and he won't draw blood. Keep up the training and make sure that everyone yelps.... Very powerful method.

If you learn the technique, then you can apply the "yelp" to other circumstances, also. I believe that "yelp" is "Please don't do that, I don't like it." in dog communication. I currently use the yelp when my dog plays tug, then runs with the toy, when he fetches and keeps it out of reach or when he takes a treat too quickly....
 
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