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Discussion Starter #1
Im not really a newbie dog owner but the question is very basic.How do I get my 12 week old pup to stop biting/nipping?.Im stumped.But my 8yo son and his friends are getting sick of being bitten up every day.The pup is so excited she has to mouth everything, my hand , my arm our faces whatever...How do make it clear its okay to lick but not bite?
We've only had her for almost 3 weeks but have taught her to sit and Ive taught her to look at me.But thats about it other then potty training.Thanks so much for any help.
 

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Every time the teeth touch skin or even your clothes you YELP! or OUCH! and immediately stop all play. Don't even look at her. That clearly tells her/shows her that biting stops all play/attention. The problem will be the kids. They must do the same thing....everytime or the training is almost useless.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks we will try this.How long will it take? She mouths everything, Im afraid I may have encouraged her behaviour because that first week she seemed to calm down when I let her chew on my fingers(She still does this but gently).
 

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Pups learn very quickly and some will stop after just a few lessons if everyone is consistent. It helps to redirect/give things the pup CAN chew on...Kongs, bones, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
She has a ton of toys, I will say though she has ruined 3 in just the last week..She is a big chewer..She is 3/4 rottie and 1/4 heeler so she has pretty much torn up the toys that have lasted the iggies months.I did buy her a kong and put pbutter in it but our rather bossy boston terrier keeps taking it away.
 

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Sounds like teething...remember when the kids were babies??? I wet old(clean)facecloths and freeze them, it worked for both dogs.But I also agree with the previous post that says to loudly say ouch and immediately stop paying attention to the dog completely.We did it with our very dominant shepherd and it does work but you gotta stick to your guns and be patient.Good luck!
 

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We are having this problem too, and i think it means that until this point our training for the biting hasn't been very good.

Part of the problem for us is that we stay with him most of the time in the living room, which doesn't have a door, and if we try to say ouch and leave, he follows us and keeps biting, and it is painful (and getting more painful the more the little bugger grows).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Would it be a good idea to time the pup out( maybe leash her up or isolate her in another room)?
For instance this morning she was all excited to see my 8yo son.She jumped up and bit him repeatedly even after he yelped loudly and told her "No Bite" and kept pushing her down( he now has a couple good scratches on his arms).I finally had to grab her collar and yell at her(probably wrong thing to do) and she reached around and started biting me.She doesnt seem to be able to stop when she is excited no matter what we do.
We will keep at it, because this is probably the most important lesson for her to learn.
 

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Would it be a good idea to time the pup out( maybe leash her up or isolate her in another room)?
For instance this morning she was all excited to see my 8yo son.She jumped up and bit him repeatedly even after he yelped loudly and told her "No Bite" and kept pushing her down( he now has a couple good scratches on his arms).I finally had to grab her collar and yell at her(probably wrong thing to do) and she reached around and started biting me.She doesnt seem to be able to stop when she is excited no matter what we do.
We will keep at it, because this is probably the most important lesson for her to learn.
Time-outs are a powerful behavior modificaction tool but, you have to know what to do with them. The social isolation (which is quite traumatic for a young pup) is only the first half of the program. The new behavior that the pup shows you after coming out of isolation is the critical point...you must reinforce the new, better, behavior (no longer biting or jumping or whatever behavior you're trying to change). If you don't work with the new behavior, the isolation is useless.

More to the point here.....you and your son should immediately leave the room...leaving the pup alone/isolated. The pups 'playthings' leave. You don't talk to him or even look at him...you leave. Now, when you come back to the room and the pup is standing, sitting or laying there quietly (hopefully) that better behavior is what gets your attention/praise.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
you and your son should immediately leave the room...leaving the pup alone/isolated. The pups 'playthings' leave. You don't talk to him or even look at him...you leave. Now, when you come back to the room and the pup is standing, sitting or laying there quietly (hopefully) that better behavior is what gets your attention/praise.
This sounds good but I have a feeling he will just start up with the other dogs in the room instead.But we will give this a try as well.But another thing wont he just follow us out?
 

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=cece6;577886]Would it be a good idea to time the pup out( maybe leash her up or isolate her in another room)?
Contained in a room with baby gates works, or, an x-pen. You want to be able to leave when the behavior is unacceptable. She will learn that when she does that, she loses her greatest resource, YOU (or your son, etc.).

For instance this morning she was all excited to see my 8yo son.She jumped up and bit him repeatedly even after he yelped loudly and told her "No Bite" and kept pushing her down( he now has a couple good scratches on his arms).
Doing this actually stimulates her to get even wilder. (She took your son's behavior as play.) I quietly say "wrong," and leave the room, so access to me is impossible.

I finally had to grab her collar and yell at her(probably wrong thing to do) and she reached around and started biting me.She doesnt seem to be able to stop when she is excited no matter what we do. We will keep at it, because this is probably the most important lesson for her to learn.
You're correct; grabbing her collar and yelling is not the thing to do (though certainly undrstandable!). My puppy's nickname was LandShark for awhile! Didn't matter if I turned my back, she'd bite my butt OUCH. So, I got out the baby gates, and kept her in the kitchen area, or else in the living room, using the French door and/or baby gate. The second she started the bouncing and nipping, I stepped over the gate and just ignored her. Tried again a few minutes later. She figured it out pretty quick, so now my little LandShark is my sweet lamb! LOL Heaven FORBID she can't have access to me!
 

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My brother's method of choice to deal with the biting and hyperness (after having assured himself that the dog isn't acting out because he is hungry/thirsty/needs to go potty/ or tired) is to grab the dog and hold his muzzle closed and hold him basically till the puppy becomes calm and submissive. Can someone please comment on this?

I know that he needs to learn bite inhibition rather than just not to use his mouth at all, and we are teaching him that also, but when he gets totally out of control this is what my brother does, and I don't have enough knowledge or experience to say what effects it will have on the dog.
 

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My brother's method of choice to deal with the biting and hyperness (after having assured himself that the dog isn't acting out because he is hungry/thirsty/needs to go potty/ or tired) is to grab the dog and hold his muzzle closed and hold him basically till the puppy becomes calm and submissive. Can someone please comment on this?

I know that he needs to learn bite inhibition rather than just not to use his mouth at all, and we are teaching him that also, but when he gets totally out of control this is what Sebi does, and I don't have enough knowledge or experience to say what effects it will have on the dog.
Most pups will become very hand shy. Whenever someone reaches for them they will run away or get very defensive...more biting out of self-defense.

While the dog may tolerate that manhandling by the owner(s) anyone else who tries to 'correct' the dog will probably be attacked. By 'correct' I mean anyone reaching for the dog in the same manner...maybe just to pet him but, all the dog sees is that same hand/arm motion to perhaps grab his muzzle.
 

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Im not really a newbie dog owner but the question is very basic.How do I get my 12 week old pup to stop biting/nipping?.Im stumped.But my 8yo son and his friends are getting sick of being bitten up every day.The pup is so excited she has to mouth everything, my hand , my arm our faces whatever...How do make it clear its okay to lick but not bite?
We've only had her for almost 3 weeks but have taught her to sit and Ive taught her to look at me.But thats about it other then potty training.Thanks so much for any help.

Use this technique The Bite Stops Here it WORKS you just have to be ruthlessly CONSISTENT.

You might also start working on Doggy Zen for self control and 'Leave It' and Rev Up/Cool Down to teach the pup to settle.
 
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