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My 9wk old Lab and my 6wk old Husky play REALLY rough! They adore eachother. They sleep together, eat together, and get along great. But playtime turns into an all out war at times. They will be rolling around on the floor lay biting and growling, and then one of them will get too rough and it "sounds" like they are killing eachother. Is this just part of learning bite inhibition or do I need to seperate them when this happens? What should I do?
 

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When "one of them gets too rough" does the other pup yelp? and when he yelps does the rough one back off, if even for a couple of seconds? If so..you are fine. If not, and the intensity increases without respect to the discomfort of the other pup it is time for a time out and separation of the pups.

If there is no yelp and just manic growling and face biting it's not such a big deal..though I would personally give them each a break if it gets too INTENSE. They both need to learn where their "off switches" are.

Make sure you also spend time with both pups separately for training and walking. Dogs brought up together can become so bonded that difficulties can arise....try taking them to separate puppy classes and on walks separately..so they can both learn to handle the world and all that is in it independently..eventually you can do all these things together..but the first six months or so independence is key for long term emotional well being. If they are being crated together at night, maybe think about (soon but not RIGHT now..) having separate crates next to each other.
 

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I am more of the interventionist school in these matters. Labs and Huskies are natural born roughnecks. Many appear to have been born without nerve endings in their hides. They can play very rough without anyone getting their feelings hurt. That kind of play with other dogs, however, may cause a playmate to feel (s)he is under full fledged assault. This can cause real problems. The other consideration is that when these pups are grown, that kind of play can turn your house upside down. In a New York minute.

They need to get that stuff out of their systems (they're going to get it out one way or another) but they need to be able to turn it off when you say "stop".
 
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