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How would you help her or explain how to train her pittie?


"I'm very interested in trying out mushing. I have a pit bull terrier that I just added to my family and I think it would be a great outlet for him. I take my golden and lab biking and have so much fun, I've wanted to teach them to pull me, but am just not sure how. I'm also wanting to take my new boy (Hudson) biking, but haven't worked up the courage yet. He has an incredibly insane prey drive and I'm afraid he will take off after a small critter and I'll go crashing behind him. We are starting training tomorrow, but was hoping you could give me a little more insight. "
 

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I think the best thing to say is buy Ski Spot Run.

Other than that, if your dog is already trained, try hooking them up together. I wish I had access to a trained dog to help teach all of the commands. Or there might be a club in her area that can help. Around here, the only club is a skijoring one(I've never set foot in a pair of skis before).
 

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I think the best thing to say is buy Ski Spot Run.
I second Ski Spot Run, its for Skijoring, but it definitely tells you enough about the other sports to get you started, and most importantly tells you the cues and gives training tips. On top of it, really easy and good read!
 

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I second that book suggestion. I've never read it myself but I've heard nothing but good things about it so it must be good. lol

My suggestion for a dog with high prey drive is to teach a solid "On by". I have 2 Alaskans that are part sight hound and they are my main leaders so it is doable.
What I did is I would take each of my dogs out on a walk by themselves (either with their running harness or a collar, it doesn't matter). Whenever we came to a distraction on the trail, I would tell them "On by" and start running. Once we got passed the distraction, I would slow back down to a walk and give them lots of praise.

Now when we are in a race or just training and we come to a distraction in the trail, I call out "On by" and the dogs fly passed whatever is on the trail. :)



Sled Dog Central This site has everything you want to know about dog powered sports. They also have a page full of links to places that sell equipment.

I hope that helps. If she needs any more info, let me know! :)
 

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I love Ski Spot Run. Gives a really solid foundation for how to train commands really simply, just on walks before actually getting involved in any pulling. Really, I think any dog who pulls on a walk can urban mush, regardless of what specific sport.

If your friend is worried to start out on a bike (which is understandable), they could do canicross until the commands are polished and they feel more confident. That's just jogging/running (or for people who aren't runners, walking) with the dog out in front attached to a special belt you wear. Also, I was too intimidated to start on a bike and that's why I got my scooter... shorter and not as far to fall. :p I have the Dirt Dawg, it's not that expensive and I enjoy it so much I never did switch over to the bike.

If one dog is more motivated, it can help teach the other "on by". Maisy loves pulling SO much that she will body block Squash from going off the trail and/or check him back on track, or just drag him along until he gets his focus back. If your friend can find an experienced dog to hook up their dog(s) with, they can help do the same thing.

Also if there are relatively quiet places to start out when they actually get on a bike (or whatever), it is helpful. Around the neighborhood was so distracting... if there are some state parks or other parks with multi-use trails, they are great to use during "off" hours.
 
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