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My Fiancée and I split up and she took the dog, now I'm looking into getting another dog since I'm kind of lonely sometimes and I have the time on my hands. I'm wanting a Bigger Dog Breed like a Rottweiler, Doberman or Mastiff. My problem is idk if I'm 100% ready. I mean I trained our last dog and I was told if I do the same things with a big dog then it will workout but I also heard bigger dogs need to be put in their place and know their role. I know that my bigger dog will need lots of exercise and not just the fenced in backyard kind that some do. I guess my main questions are how do I prepare myself for a big dog? Is a big dog much different than a small dog? Do I have to be aggressive towards it to get it to know its role? I would prefer to have a loving family dog when it's all said and done but something as a protector also. Any info would be appreciated
 

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A dog's training and exercise requirements are not dependant on size. Big dogs eat more. They take up more space in the car and on the bed (if allowed.) Cost of things like Heartguard and Frontline will be higher. A large, untrained dog can drag you down the street or off your feet on a leash or jump a modest fence. Those are the main differences I've noticed.

Forget about showing a large dog, or any dog, who's boss. You cannot bully the dogs you're considering and would be ill-advised to bully any dog into "submission." They will do what you want, not out of fear, but because you've shown them they they get what they want but doing what you want.

It's a symbiotic relationship.
 

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Large dogs are more likely to be babies in my experience. Rottis are babies, Dobies are super sensitive and mastiffs are 100+ lb lap dogs. Clicker training works for several thousand lb whales, it'll train your 100 lb dog.

Do be warned, though, every little thing is more money, food, frontline, collars, harnesses, everything.
 

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Also, it's not true that the larger the dog, the more exercise they will need (at least from a Dane owner perspective!) I'm talking generalities here, but our dogs are fine with some backyard play and a 30-45 minute walk most days (Livia needs a bit more, but she's still puppy and has much more energy than Loki ever did!)
 

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I don't stress the money part I just want my dog to feel like I'm loving it and doing everything to fulfill its needs, I don't mind having a big lap dog but I don't want my dog being the aggressive out of control dog that people are scared of. Now that I know it's about training I will just treat it like I did my small dog but just pay a little extra for it lol thank you
 

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When I did research online they did mention the Mastiffs and Danes didn't need much exercise and were very relaxed after being puppies lol so that's also a good thing on my lazy days when I'm allowed to have them
 

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As others have mentioned, big dogs mean bigger bills. Anything based on weight will cost more. They eat more, but not always significantly more especially if you feed one of the better quality foods (they're able to digest more, so you feed less and pick up less out of the yard). Exercise depends on the dog, season, day or even time of the day. Absolutely no need to be aggressive with a big dog. Big dogs are often very sensitive and that rough handling will confuse him/her and damage the relationship between the two of you. Rough, aggressive handling can cause you to end up with a fearful, unpredictable dog that is a danger to those around him/her.

It is not necessary to be rough with a dog so he sees you as boss. Just like any relationship, you must earn the others respect and trust. A gentle hand is not a sign of weakness but it'll sure have a dog looking at you like your a god (or goddess in my case).

From your location I see you're in the Navy. One thing to keep in mind, if you live on base be sure you check out breed bans and be aware of any during future moves.
 

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Oh my... the stuff you can find on the internet...
Alpha theory has been debunked for a while and you don't need to be mean to your big dog to train and earn respect from said dog. I am a small, 23 year old girl and I have complete control over my doberman - I've trained him with positive methods (clicker training, treat rewards, redirecting, etc... but no dominance and alpha rolls and whatever). With any dog, if you care for your dog, provide what he or she needs, play with your dog, take the dog fun places, and train your dog then you will have respect from the dog.

Dobermans are a high energy dog. For example, I would take him to work with me (doggie daycare) where he would play for about 5 hours and after work we'd go to the dog park for two hours before we went home. At home he'd still want to play, lots! Also, they are super intelligent and they NEED a job. If you don't tire them out and/or give them something to do then they will find something and it won't always be a good something - this goes for any smart breed. They are also part of the "aggressive" breed list that insurance companies have so it can be hard to find a place to live with one and difficult to get home insurance. I love my dog and I wouldn't give him up for anything but I get a lot of flack for having him - simply because of his breed. I don't care about it and just blow it off but it really gets to some people.

As for big dogs in general - big dogs are more expensive. You have more food and you need bigger things (crate, collars, bowls, toys, etc) and those bigger things cost more. They make bigger messes and they take up more space.

Anyways, if you have any question about dobes specifically you're more than welcome to send me a message. I'm happy to help :]
 

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You have a lovely Dobie, pwr! I don't know know where they get their rep from. My grandfather had a whole string of Dobies when I was growing up, all trained using positive methods and all wonderfully obedient.
 

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You have a lovely Dobie, pwr! I don't know know where they get their rep from. My grandfather had a whole string of Dobies when I was growing up, all trained using positive methods and all wonderfully obedient.
Thank you! He's an amazing dog and I just love him so much <3
While I truly believe that he will never die (he's not allowed to) he has made me realize that I will always have a doberman.

With the negative rep thing... just like the Pitties, the Rotties, and the GSDs their negative rep has come from movies, books, and the media. I don't really mind it, to be honest. I mean, it shouldn't be perpetuated and I think that the owners of these dogs should do their best to make sure their dogs are good representatives of the breed. However, as I mentioned in my previous post, I am a young woman who was going to be living alone so I wanted an intimidating looking dog. I don't expect my dog to be aggressive nor do I expect him or want him to put himself in danger for me but I do expect him to ward off suspicious/creepy individuals and he's done just that plenty of times.
 

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You have a lovely Dobie, pwr! I don't know know where they get their rep from. My grandfather had a whole string of Dobies when I was growing up, all trained using positive methods and all wonderfully obedient.
A guy in the town I grew up in fed his Dobies gun powder to make them meaner-that's the kind of guy that the bad rap comes from. Bad people in the bad parts of town doing bad things, that's where the bad rap comes from for the breed as a whole. Though media also plays a huge role.
 
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