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I have 7 month, 7 lb male Yorkie. I didn't crate train him and now I can't leave the house without a babysitter. (and then I've seen cats held under a faucet of water fight less) MY QUESTION IS:.. AS I CRATE TRAIN HIM...SLOWLY... will he be OKAY?? or should I get him a companion?? And should I get the Metal kind or the plastic pet carrier variety??
 

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Why can't you leave the house? What does he do?
 

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It's always a bad idea to get another dog JUST to keep your first dog company. Very often having second dog won't change separation related problems when you leave the house, and in the worst case scenario they may not even get along. If you're considering a puppy, you'll need to be aware that an impressionable pup may even learn that you leaving is scary and stressful from the older dog, meaning you've doubled your original problem. A puppy and an adolescent can be an extremely difficult combination anyway, and I don't recommend anyone do it even if they aren't dealing with a significant behavior problem.

I agree that it would be helpful to know specifically how he's behaving and what he's doing when you try to leave, and what happens if he's left home alone. For example, is he making a huge fuss when you leave but eventually calms down, or do you come home to destruction, potty accidents, him having injured himself, etc.?
 

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While i would overwhelmingly support the notion that dogs are much happier whene living in a multi-dog situation... I would have to say, do NOT get a second dog until you have resolved any behavioral issues.

I recommend the plastic carrier with metal grating for door

 

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Socialization at a Dog Park or local Yorkie Club also highly recommended .... for both of you ... he'll meet well behaved dogs and you'll meet educated owners.
 

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I strongly disagree that a dog park is a good place for socialization in most cases. Especially ones that are a relatively small, flat fenced area with nothing to break sightlines and no way for dogs to get away from each other. These are called 'Thunderdome' dog parks for a reason - they promote high-intensity play and result in a lot of dogs getting overstimulated and practicing rude behaviors. This goes doubly for a dog who already has issues with anxiety or reactivity. Large, park-style dog parks with trails and different areas are better, but I'd still caution against allowing free socialization with lots of strange, unknown-to-you dogs.

The truth is you just don't know anything about the other dogs brought there by strangers, nor how well the owners understand dog behavior and are able to manage their own dogs to ensure everyone plays politely and safely. A lot of dogs that go to dog parks honestly have no business being there, because they're not comfortable or relaxed in that environment. Things can go wrong very quickly, especially with toy breeds (though if you use a dog park that has a 'small dog' and 'big dog' area, that risk can be mitigated somewhat).

Additionally, socialization doesn't have much or anything to do with separation related issues, so while quality socialization is important, I'm skeptical that it'll make any difference to the problem the OP is facing.
 

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All I can say is that your experiences in dog parks varies vastly from my own. Not that I haven't seen bad parks, but that I have experienced both good and bad ones. A kids playground in a ghetto or large city presents different atmosphere and experience than suburbia . When I was living in NYC, I certainly would not enter parks in certain neighborhoods after dark. When I moved as a teen, we camped out in them.

I would certainly have to disagree that most people should never go to a Honky Tonk cause most of them are a fight fest like that movie "Roadhouse" .
I would certainly have to disagree that most people should never ride a bike on the road cause most of them are like a demolition derby or death Race 2000
I would certainly have to disagree that most people should never let their kids go away to college cause it is just a bunch of drunken frat parties at most of them

Yes, those activities do occur but, it's by no means universal. Responsible communities do have an interest in providing a safe resource for their residents. Certainly there are lousy parks, lousy dogs and lousy dog park communities. But we all,I hope, have the cognitive ability to evaluate the park itself, the community of owners and the dogs that routinely use them as well. Other than the universal rules of spay / neuter, poopie pick up, tags, etc .... Is a permit required ? are the rules enforced ? Are puppies, dogs with a known history of dangerous behavior and female dogs in heat prohibited ? Are dogs permitted ONLY in the company of responsible adults and no children under 12 ? Are dogs and Owners required to leave at the 1st sign of aggression. Are food, drink, toys, balls or anything that might trigger aggression or resource guaring prohibited. Are owners required to carry a picture ID of themselves AND the dog ? Does the regulatory authority act on complaints, responding to the site if rules are not followed and banning problem dogs and owners ?

Today with social media, we have people taking medical advice based upon what they read on social media. Youtube videos,tiktok, etc. sensationalize dangerous behaviors. A video of a dog fight will get a million hits and "Rover playing with Lassie" will get 7. The idea of being in a small place with a whole bunch of dogs capable of chewing our face off is something anyone might feel daunting. We received our 1st purchased purebred dog just a few months before our wedding and the breeder took the dog for a week after the wedding to give us some time and but also show season was starting and she wanted to boost her profile by showing the dog. It was only a county wide thing but he came home with a blue ribbon. Curious as to what that world was all about, when she invited us to bring the dog to a local show that was held locally in a HS gym, we went. I expected pandemonium, dogs barking, pulling, acting out....I walked in and owners where just standing around the outer perimeter of the basketball court, with all their dogs .. all were leashed, half of them the owners were even holding the other end of the leash. The dogs are all sitting or lying down, docile as lambs and looking around lazily but pretty much ignoring everyone / every dog else. When we walked in, our energetic, leash pulling, prancing sometimed obedient dog just immediately chilled and calmly walked with us to our breeders spot and sat down. It was weird seeing how our dog reacted very differently to a group of dogs as compared to 1 or 2 dogs. When I commented to our breeder she said, "Dog's behaviors will typically mimick the cues of their owners". This is a new thing, "instinct" doesn't cover this. They don't know how to behave, so they look to their owners for instruction. I learned a lot that day from the other dog owners, this was our 2nd Dobie but the 1st we purchased from a breeder. Eighty dogs in a confined space and I could actually hear people talking all the way across the court. Who'd-a-thot ? Our breeder would take him for weekends to other shows for about 18 months. It changed him.

The saying "There are no bad dogs, just bad owners" applies here. The are no doubt poor park designs but when designed by knowledgeable professionals, we are left, physical designs aside, with the corollary: "There's no bad parks, just bad dog park communities". A lonely road that stretches for a bit in a straight line with no sidewalk might be a scary place to walk your dog along as people will be tempted to speed ... I think we'd agree. But what about if it was 30 mph speed limit and it's enforced, stop signs every other corner and a 12 foot road shoulder ... same level of risk ? I say no.

I read the Doberman at Dog Parks thread. What many dog owners often don't realize is that they do take their cues from their owners. 1. The owner of the aggressively barking dog failed in his duty to control his dog. That dog is protecting his owner from a perceived threat. 2. Seeing no reaction from his owner, the other dog becomes scared because the owner is scared. 3. The dog park community failed in it's responsibility to report aggressive dogs. 4.The owner of the scared dog failed to behave in a manner which would help his dog's confidence, by maintaining confident posture, ignoring the "yapperhead" dog and calling the aggressive dog owner to account. We have a Dobie regular at the local park; all of our Dobies attended the park for 20+ years, there were other Dobermans. We didn't go often because our property is have plenty of room and friends (cats and dogs,ours and "play dates") to play with at home and Dobies never tried to leave the property.

Years back, we had taken in a severely abused lab and tho he lived with another rescued Dobie, he never wagged his tail or showed a spring in his step other than at the dog park. Personal responsibility is in play here, dog owner's should be aware of their dog's nature if they are aggressive or rude and not bring their dogs to such a place until such behaviors are resolved. Culture plays a role here. If I don't stick out my pinkie while drinking my tea, in some social circles, that might be highly offensive I guess .... but allowing your dog to act rudely is a huge social faux pas. Meeting your mistress at the dog park is fine ... but if her dog acts rudely, look out ! They say "Hell has no fury as a woman scorned", but even that pales next to a dog owner when another dog's owner does not control their dog. Once a man and his wife came with 2 dogs,1st timers, and they didn't lock the 1st entry gate before opening the second ... the reaction of the 'circle' was like they were gonna run them outta town.

Apologizing the the length of the following in advance, but selecting a park should be treated as no less important than choosing the right breed, or veterinarian. . Do your homework, don't recommend walking in and expecting all to be honky dory. As indicated, we hadn't gone to our local dog park for years given that our property was so large and our Dobies were homebodies who never made an attempt to escape. But, the large, heavily wooded property became a liability w/our current dogs as I can't continuously monitor 2,000 feet of fence. Here's how I approached it:

1. Familiarized myself with the rules. Rules are strict, see above.

2. Went to the park by myself and sat with the owners and their dogs for about 90 minutes from 4:30 to 6:00 as figured it would be the busiest. It's huge, it has lots of trees, sloped.... pine needles still blanket the shaded areas, sand in the open spaces. Water available. There were about 8 dogs. When I arrived and entered, every dog ran over to see the new person. They sniffed to smell if I had a doggie at home I guess,wagged tails, sniffed my pockets for snacks as I walked over to the "chair circle" of owners. We introduced ourselves, we talked about the park, how many dogs / people are usually here (3 - 12), any history of issues, any problem dogs, etc. As this was at a point in time where only a small % of the population was vaccinated, I took note of the fact that everyone was wearing masks in consideration of others. Consideration ... good sign.

3. Observed zero "high intensity" play and zero rudeness other than an occasional doggie hump by a young pup that day ....The activity level of the dogs was far below what I see every day at home,mostly bouts of "chase me, then I'll chase you" with lots of laying down in between

4. Every once and a while one of the "cliques" (dogs who, I was told, have known each other for long periods and socialize outside of park) would get up and engage in light horseplay .... placing a paw on another's back, mouthing each other playfully barking a bit when another would not engage. None of these lasted more than 10 minutes or so, most a lot less. One thing I noticed was no growling, my two dogs are always play growling when they play at home. Over the 90 minutes, I'd say dogs were either lying still or just strolling around for 60.

5. One of the circle group was a husky mix owner and when another person arrived with a purebred one (both males), it prompted me to ask if there had been any dominance issues between the two or with any other dogs ..... for the most part, none of the 'circle' could recall anything other than between their own 2 dogs. Dogs ranged I'd guess from about 30 - 100 pounds I'd guess. A few made mention of infrequent instances where a new dog had come in and behaved badly but they were asked to leave.

6. All the parks are, of course, double gated ...so the 2nd time I went, stayed in between the gates with the dog and all the doggies came up to sniff and greet ...no aggressive behaviors observed. I then switched to a longer leash and let them run up and down the fence them inside, my dog outside. When the dogs got bored, we left

7. Came back next (3rd) time a bit earlier after arranging to meet a wife's friend from work on weekend morning ... we were the only ones there for about an hour, intent being to let our dog explore the place. Being who she is, she walked the entire fence line looking for a way out I presumed. The two dogs, other being a GSD played a bit, drank some water and walked around a lot. As others arrived,I noticed each one paused at the double gate area letting their dog meet the newcomer for a bit before coming in. Our dog keeps to herself exploring and running more than she'll engage in other interactive play. Smaller groups outside the circle come in and sit on other benches ... neither the people nor the dogs from the separate groups interact much with each other other than short chit chats coming in and out. I notice that the dogs from these smaller groups socialize mostly among themselves. With this dog, I have been going again since March, once or twice a week, and have yet to encounter anything that would prompt me or any other owner to intervene. My dog plays chase a bit but other than that mostly just walks around.

8. Looking forward to going with the two dogs once weather clears. Kinda anxious as with holiday scraps and the lack of activity, Dog No.1 seems to be huffing and puffing after just 30 minutes in the exercise pen. And with her sister there, I'm hoping she'll be more inclined to engage wit the other dogs.

To summarize, yes a bad park is not the place for a dog with issues to learn better behaviors .... just like adding a new dog to a home with a problem dog is not going to help the new dog learn better behaviors. Just like a bad restaurant, if you don't like the food, I guess stopping going to restaurants is an option,but so is finding a better one. We get to decide these things. And I don't mean a bad park as in poorly designed or limited in amenities, I mean a bad park as one with misbehaving dogs, inattentive owners and lax rules that are not actively enforced by both the park community (dog owners) and the agency that issues the permits. The OPs problem is that the dog has only one living being in its life. That dog is "the doggie master" of that domain and any younger or similar age dog brought into that domain will emulate the behavior of "the master". As the dog is socialized,it will a) realize that there are other beings in the world, b) have it's attention diverted from that "one"' being, c) learn from the mature dogs around it that they can enjoy the company of others, and d) potentially open the door to the possibility of adding and companion.

Many rescue groups will refuse to allow adoptions for many dog breeds to families with cats. And it's an effort to bring dog into a home and break that prey drive. And here's where the socialization aspect comes in. Withour last Dobie ...she came into a dog free home after our other dogs had passed. We had that gate up for about 5 weeks before it was taken down. When my son came home form collage, with his dog, he was extremely aggressive biting the metal gate. We confined son's dog to one side and ferried the Dobie to either side throughout the day. Four days later the gate came down. Takes three aspects a) young cats that are used to dogs (older cats tend to be cranky) b) dog that is cool w/ cats and c) a strong metal bar grate between cat world and dog world. The dog gets to observe the humans and other dog interact with the cats ... the dog is scolded for aggressive behaviors at the gate. Shortly it's all one big family.

So yes, based upon these experiences, I do belive that socialization can change behaviors, our Dobie went from a frantic over stimulated adolescent to a calm, relaxed and obedient dog. Abused lab went from a fearful shivering mess of a dog to almost a normal dog. Now up to about 6 cat haters that well, can't quite figure it out ...3 of them will actively play with the cats and the other 3 just ignore thm.
 

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Other than the universal rules of spay / neuter, poopie pick up, tags, etc .... Is a permit required ? are the rules enforced ? Are puppies, dogs with a known history of dangerous behavior and female dogs in heat prohibited ? Are dogs permitted ONLY in the company of responsible adults and no children under 12 ? Are dogs and Owners required to leave at the 1st sign of aggression. Are food, drink, toys, balls or anything that might trigger aggression or resource guaring prohibited. Are owners required to carry a picture ID of themselves AND the dog ? Does the regulatory authority act on complaints, responding to the site if rules are not followed and banning problem dogs and owners ?
I have NEVER seen a dog park with 1) such rules as you list, and 2) personnel to enforce any such laws.
 

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I agree with Toedtoes, I have never had the luxury of living near a dogpark where there was staff to enforce rules, even when I lived in a large American city. I've heard of some that do (though never anywhere near me), but these are high-end facilities that require a membership fee to use, so the staff that supervises and enforced rules can be appropriately compensated.

I have witnessed my own dog - who's only about twice as big as the OPs so still very much a small dog - go from excited play in dog parks to stressed, defensive, and rude due to me not recognizing that he couldn't tolerate the chaotic, overstimulating environment. We deal with strange dog reactivity with him to this day. The only 'dog park' we use these days is a large field with wooded areas, trails, a big hill, and a river owned by someone who trains gundogs on the property - most of the time we're the only ones there, and if not, it's very easy for us to give other dogs plenty of distance.

I could go on, but the point stands that separation issues in the home are not going to be solved by any flavor of socialization with other dogs. They are unrelated behaviors. As the OP hasn't replied, it's hard to say whether this dog has true separation anxiety or another kind of separation related problem, but either way, any training or behavior modification has to happen in the home environment, where the dog is struggling.
 

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I have NEVER seen a dog park with 1) such rules as you list, and 2) personnel to enforce any such laws.
Neither have I. Nor have I ever heard of such a thing in all of the places I have lived, and in all of the years I have had dogs and hung out in various ways with dog people. the description is a nice ideal, but those kinds of ideals are few and very far in between, and exist only in rarified communities if at all.
 

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Neither have I. Nor have I ever heard of such a thing in all of the places I have lived, and in all of the years I have had dogs and hung out in various ways with dog people. the description is a nice ideal, but those kinds of ideals are few and very far in between, and exist only in rarified communities if at all.
While I agree such dog parks are a VERY rare (but wonderful) asset to a community, they do exist. The off leash parks of DuPage County, IL are fabulous. And most all of them are huge. The ones we preferred to visit when I lived there were in the 15 - 30+ acre size, with one being over 60 acres. (Thunderdome they were not! lol) They do require a paid permit (per dog, max 3 dogs per person in the parks) and have a list of extensive rules/regulations.

That being said, there is no one official at the parks on a daily basis to enforce any such rules, so it's really still up to the patrons to make sure things are running smoothly. (in the event of an 'emergency' situation, you can call the county forest preserve office for assistance) Fortunately with the expansive size, it's easy to keep moving/walking with your dogs along the paths, which reduces the friction & overarousal that tends to build up in the more 'traditional' dog parks.

The only other city I've found with comparable off leash areas was in Lexington KY.
 

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I agree with Toedtoes, I have never had the luxury of living near a dogpark where there was staff to enforce rules, even when I lived in a large American city. I've heard of some that do (though never anywhere near me), but these are high-end facilities that require a membership fee to use, so the staff that supervises and enforced rules can be appropriately compensated.

I could go on, but the point stands that separation issues in the home are not going to be solved by any flavor of socialization with other dogs. They are unrelated behaviors. As the OP hasn't replied, it's hard to say whether this dog has true separation anxiety or another kind of separation related problem, but either way, any training or behavior modification has to happen in the home environment, where the dog is struggling.
This reminds me of an Aussie I met in a club one night who said "All American beer is "Shite" ,.. and he made this judgement because back home he had sampled Miller and Coors.... the McDonalds and Burger King of beer. I don't feel "not having seen it" as grounds enough for saying it doesn't exist and that it can't possibly produce satisfactory results. He wound up staying with us for the weekend and got a chance to sample some good beers but by the end of the weekend, we turned him into a wino. :)

1. We have dog parks all over the place. Some are an open field with a fence, with no real oversight; we have one in the neighboring Town which is very close to us (our property is one house from town border) but over the Town line so not being a resident we wouldn't go there. However, they have no one checking; I have visited it, and having done so, I used my ability to make an informed judgement, to conclude it does not fit my needs and is not one I would attend. That Town is primarily rural in nature, where ours is very suburban with high taxes, Im on the border. Here the parks are well designed, having some combination of municipal water service, bathrooms, obstacle courses, beaches, pools etc. All of them are visited daily by Town personnel at least twice a day, vehicle gates opened in the am, closed in the pm, trash removed, lawns mowed, fallen branches picked up, poopie bag dispensers refilled, doggie (kiddie) pool cleaned. Town has a phone number dedicated to dog licensing, park passes and park management. There's no official rules warden onsite but with almost half a million residents with a rohy 23 x 23 mile footprint, response times are great. Other items that don't ring true include

2. We are not in a city and I wouldn't be very inclined to go to a one in major city, (with land costs in cities, allocation of space would seem to be a major issue). ... given the general mindset as a former NYC resident that apartment dogs are a generally a bit too pent up with energy....however, if I found myself in that situation, I like to think I'd keep an open mind, conduct significant reconnaissance and make in informed decision .

3. Ya can't use any park or even walk ya dog in the street w/o a dog license ($7.00). Every community has an active civic association and loose dogs, barking dogs and aggressive dogs are quickly reported and if unlicensed, uh oh.

4. To use a dog park here you must 1st be a Town resident, same for any park, beach, pool, ball field whatever, all are free tho I don't know about pools as we live near a lake. The high "membership fee" (tho it was $25/yr back in 2013) for both dogs amounted to the cost of two postage stamps but only because I needed to supply pictures. Applying on line is free. Four days after they received each of the applications, I received a PhotoID card and a key Fob which I can use in any of 6 local Dog Parks. Tho if ya lose the card or key FOB, ya can either pay $15 or wait till your renewal date when they send ya a new one. Though it's the largest Town in the State and the 2nd most populous in the county, all the dog parks are < 20 miles away... the tax base provides for a lot of amenities.

5. As was clearly stated, and as indicated by the "circle" example given, the rules are well enforced by the park's community of users.

6. The Town does respond to complaints from the community and will revoke the pass for repeat offenders, the police will come if called when someone refuses to remove an aggressive dog

The actual stated question here was, in fact, whether to get a companion dog, not how to address separation anxiety. The separation anxiety was / is a separate question and not one I chose to address directly because adding a 2nd dog does not necessarily eliminate the separation anxiety. While socialization is most often defined in the doggie sense as introducing the dog and getting him to tolerate new people and his environment, we already know that's not an issue for the OP as dog is fine with a baby sitter in his environment. If the Owner is considering a second dog, the owner needs to know that this option is a no-starter if the dogs can't get along. So, that accomplishes a whole load of nothing when considering bringing in a 2nd dog. We have had multiple dogs for the last 25 or so years. Few things are sadder than living with a dog who has lost it's "roommate".

The other thing a park or club provides is an owner community. So even if you go without the og os both of you stay outside, it gives you the opportunity to meet other dog owners. Dog people are usually generous with their time and you can find someone interested in a bit of one on one time. Proceeding slowly and carefuly, letting the dogs decide how this is going to go, the two Owner / Doggie pairs can meet allowing the dogs to observe the owners and decide if they want to engage. Assuming that occurs,it puts the owner in a position to observe what happens when you leave the room and other owner stays. What happens if they go outside ? One of the reasons we wanted a 2nd dog is I work from home and Dog No. 1 was always pushing my elbows as I tried to type wanting attention or play time. I could ignore her and she'd go lay down again but I couldn't ignore the fact that she was less than happy.

Now these two are very happy go lucky as can me, they will play for 90 minutes or so, then come up, sit under my desk and sleep. When I'd put the one in the exercise pen, she'd stand there looking at me, I'd kick a ball a few times, shed get bored after 3 or 4 kicks, sniff around and then stand at the gate and whine to get out. At luch time I'll go out and play with them for 30 - 45 minutes they do very little of the huffing and puffing ... at 3 pm, they go in alone and i watch them from my window and they don't wanna come in half the time when I go out at 4 pm.

The author here notes that

"Socialization is a topic that is frequently talked about, especially in the context of puppies. In the past when I’ve asked clients what they think “socialization” means, I’ve heard answers like “playing with other dogs,” “meeting 100 new people,” or “interacting with new objects.”

The author specifically provides an example of going to a dog park with puppies to desensitize the puppies to the presence of other dogs, sitting on a blanket outside the fence and not going inside, and n training the pup to ignore the dogs anbd ficus. Worries of an aggressive dog should not even enter one's mind as no puppy should be inside for health / vaccination reason not to mention the fact that they are (or should) not be allowed. Another option I should have mentioned is doggie day care. When the only park option is one of the horror stories you described, the dog can have its separation anxieties muted with the presence of "babysitters" as its already used to and slowly introduced to other dogs as the dog comfort level allows. But again, hows that different than a well run dog park facility with conscientious owner community, letting the dog control when it take on the next level of engagement as myself and BKmuttle have used on a regular basis ?

Noting that I'm dealing with a Shepherd / Husky mix, 2 breeds generally listed in the Top 10 of aggressive dogs, there's an inherent responsibility to test behaviors. That does NOT in any way suggest that going to a ThunderDome dog park, throwing them in and then waiting to see what happens. When taking a step by step approach observing and verifying the conditions and letting the dog decide their level of engagement, at what point in the process described should a red flag go up ? The dog was never pushed into entering the park, the dog had the opportunity to not participate, the dog wes permitted to enter only when she decided she wanted to. Where exactly is the problem ?

As I said, we have been to places we decided not to particpate in for various reasons. We have had a string of positives with multiple dogs. So, I can not acceot the position that if the dog owner has taken safe precautions, satisfied themselves as to the safety of the dog both physically and mentally, the owner allowing the dog to make all the decisions with entering or participation and having it prove out in multiple instances is inevitable going to resul in some horribleoutcome.

While I agree such dog parks are a VERY rare (but wonderful) asset to a community, they do exist. The off leash parks of DuPage County, IL are fabulous. And most all of them are huge. The ones we preferred to visit when I lived there were in the 15 - 30+ acre size, with one being over 60 acres. (Thunderdome they were not! lol) They do require a paid permit (per dog, max 3 dogs per person in the parks) and have a list of extensive rules/regulations. That being said, there is no one official at the parks on a daily basis to enforce any such rules, so it's really still up to the patrons to make sure things are running smoothly.
15 - 60 acres ? Wow, now I'm jealous ! But thankful for the confirmation that positive outcomes are indeed possible. One question tho ... are these huge parks enclosed ? Dog No.2 would be fine but w/ Dog No.1 ..." oh I never smell anything so interesting ...oh wait what's that smell coming from over there....on and on and she's cross a state line within a week ... having come from a home where it spent as many as 10 - 14 hours a day in a crate, he's recall averse as when she came to her owner, it usually meant going in the crate. Getting her as a young adult has been a challenge ... I have had success using a clicker when she's on th zipline which allows her to roam over a 60'x 120'area. But when being taken off the leash as a doggie visitor arrived, she pulled free and was gone. I caught up to her down the block and she did come when called so that's progress. I have a 200' surveyors tape that I plan to use for longer distance recall training after the last 5 weeks of rain end ... snow tomorrow and none of us minds going out in that :).
 

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The actual stated question here was, in fact, whether to get a companion dog, not how to address separation anxiety. The separation anxiety was / is a separate question and not one I chose to address directly because adding a 2nd dog does not necessarily eliminate the separation anxiety. While socialization is most often defined in the doggie sense as introducing the dog and getting him to tolerate new people and his environment, we already know that's not an issue for the OP as dog is fine with a baby sitter in his environment. If the Owner is considering a second dog, the owner needs to know that this option is a no-starter if the dogs can't get along. So, that accomplishes a whole load of nothing when considering bringing in a 2nd dog.
Correct. The question was regarding if a second dog would help the OP and their dog. You are the one who brought up going to dog parks as a way to combat separation anxiety - which we do not even know is the problem as the OP has not returned to clarify WHY the dog cannot be left home alone. It may be that the dog gets bored and chews things up, or isn't properly potty trained. And the OP has never clarified why they think crate training should be done.

And I did not say there is no such thing as a dog park you describe, but it is NOT a common occurrence. Most counties do not have resources to put towards policing dog parks, especially these days.

The rest of your long post has absolutely nothing to do with the topic.
 
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My personal experience is just one of many I've seen in person and on the forums over the years. My dog was never attacked in a dog park, and there was never any major traumatizing incident - his issues arose due to perfectly normal dog-dog interaction for a dog park. He is flat-out not suited for the environment and the quality of his socialization as a puppy and young dog would have been far, far better if I had never taken him to such places. There are better, safer, and more appropriate options for dog-dog socialization out there, especially for small dogs and anxious dogs.

The OP asked if getting a second dog would help their first dog be able to stay home alone. They explicitly want a second dog in order to fix a separation related problem, hence why we're trying to provide alternative solutions.
 

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I'm still unclear if it is a "separation problem" or a "home alone problem".

Tornado-dog does not have separation problems, but he does get bored very easily. I have to make sure everything is put away (difficult for a "table clutterer") and that he has several different types of toys available when I leave. The cats have to be separated upstairs, the bird confined in her cage, and everything moved out of the center of the living room (he and Cat-dog bulldoze into things when they play). In his case, I could see someone asking if getting a second dog would help in a case like his. Answer - NO. It will help with the boredom, but will increase any potential messes, so it's a wash.
 

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'Separation Related Problem' or SRP is a term that I've seen used for a broad category of 'dog struggles with being away from owner and/or being completely alone in at least one scenario for any reason', and I'm trying to adopt it for myself. Too often the dog community uses 'separation anxiety' for everything, which is inaccurate and confusing for the average person who doesn't realize that true SA is a diagnosable anxiety disorder, and that MOST dogs who struggle with being home alone and/or separated from their owners aren't dealing with such a severe problem.

I have a FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) dog - he is absolutely not anxious when we leave (at least not anywhere near what you see in clinical SA), but hates the idea that we're doing something without him, ESPECIALLY if we're bringing our older dog with us but not him. He's much better now than when he was younger, but working with him was nothing like what I'd have to do for a SA dog.
 

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Cat-dog, GSD spayed female and Tornado-dog, JRT mix, neutered male
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OK. That makes sense. I agree that "separation anxiety" is used way too much for a wide range of issues that are not actually separation anxiety. Including the use when a dog gets hyper because you went into another room or outside without him. Tornado-dog could be described as a FOMO dog - he so wants to be a part of everything, but maybe with him he's more a DTIOE dog (demand to be in on everything). But both he and Cat-dog will happily sit in the car while I go shopping (only in the winter).
 
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Combatting FOMO is one of the reasons I am a strong proponent of doing individual daily (or as often as possible) activities when you have a multi-dog home. Even if it's just 15 - 20 minutes of personalized attention, I find it makes a huge difference in helping the dogs to become more independent of the other dogs, but more closely bonded with their human/s. It actually makes me a bit sad when I hear people refer to their dogs as "a bonded pair" and that they "can't ever be separated", because it's a sad reality that there will, in all likelihood, come a day when they are separated (unless they cross the bridge in tandem) Watching a dog fall apart in mourning because they have never learned how to be without the other one is heartbreaking.

@Jack Naylor - most of the parks were fully enclosed, but the 60 acre one was not. Dogs without a bomb-proof recall should not have been let off leash there, but sadly it did happen from time to time, occasionally with tragic consequences. :(
 
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