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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know this has been asked before, but I want to give details, so I'm asking again. :)

My daughter, Jasmine, and her DH have 'clicked' with a dog at a rescue and plan on bringing him home for a week to see if he'll be a match for their family. He is a staffy/lab mix that was rescued off the street as a young puppy and has been in foster homes and at the rescue place since then. He's a little less than a year old. They already have a 2 yr old lab, Dylan, who gets along well with other dogs, but is a spazz. We think the rescue dog is also fine with other dogs, but want to make the introduction as smoothly as possible, just in case. She has a fenced backyard but no area where they could meet off-leash; She lives on a busy street. The rescue organization invited her to bring her lab there so the dogs could meet. They would then have to take their lab home and go back to get the new dog, as they wont all fit in her car. Would it be a good idea to take her lab down there? Or is it ok for them to meet at her house on-leash? I've heard dogs shouldn't be on-leash when they meet, but also, that they shouldnt meet in one of the dog's yard, so I'm not sure how to tell her to proceed?
 

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Ideally, you want the dogs to meet off of 'home' turf, so that would mean bringing Dylan to the shelter. Under no circumstances should both dogs be off-leash! We recently went to a shelter with our Schnauzer to meet a dog we were thinking about adopting. This other dog was supposedly 'dog-friendly'. They made us introduce both dogs off-leash. Bailey is now scared of Yorkies and has several bite wounds. :(

The shelter dog should be on a leash :)

(Bailey is the dog shown in my avatar :D )
 

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The on-leash/off-leash thing is a hard call. On one hand, introducing dogs on leash changes their body language, and they may get cranky with each other due to barrier frustration. On the other hand, if they're leashed, you can pull them aprt if they fight. So it depends on how everybody involved thinks it will go.

I do recommend introducing them somewhere other than Dylan's yard. Either the park or the shelter's yard would be better.
 

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When I am bringing a new dog into the house, I like to walk them together. I have someone take the foster dog and walk ahead down the road and keep walking at a slow pace. When they are about 30 feet or so away, I start following behind with one of my dogs, and we slowly catch up. I don't allow for pulling or any kind of misbehavior during any of this or we start again. Once we catch up, I let my dog do a short smell of the new dogs rear (no more than 2 seconds or so), and then we take over and walk ahead for a little bit. Then the new dog gets to smell my dogs rear for a few seconds. Then we walk side by side for a while. Of course stop at any point if the dogs are anxious or aggressive.

I like this method because I think moving takes a lot of social pressure off of a dog. Instead of just releasing the new dog into my back yard and having 2 or more dogs rush him, I prefer to have it controlled. I would not recommend this method, for obvious reasons, if either of the dogs had any leash frustration, aggression or barrier issues.

Another way that I have done it is have both dogs on long lines. 15 feet I think is sufficient but still allows for some control. I let the dogs do their own thing for the most part, since with this method it would be important to know that both dogs are dog friendly. However, I take precaution in how they approach each other. I usually have one person come in from one side, and the other come in at a sideways angle to that, so they aren't directly facing each other and doing a more appropriate sideways greeting. I watch closely for any tensing, ear flicks, tongue licks, posturing, etc and redirect if necessary.
 

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When I am bringing a new dog into the house, I like to walk them together. I have someone take the foster dog and walk ahead down the road and keep walking at a slow pace. When they are about 30 feet or so away, I start following behind with one of my dogs, and we slowly catch up. I don't allow for pulling or any kind of misbehavior during any of this or we start again. Once we catch up, I let my dog do a short smell of the new dogs rear (no more than 2 seconds or so), and then we take over and walk ahead for a little bit. Then the new dog gets to smell my dogs rear for a few seconds. Then we walk side by side for a while. Of course stop at any point if the dogs are anxious or aggressive.

I like this method because I think moving takes a lot of social pressure off of a dog. Instead of just releasing the new dog into my back yard and having 2 or more dogs rush him, I prefer to have it controlled. I would not recommend this method, for obvious reasons, if either of the dogs had any leash frustration, aggression or barrier issues.

Another way that I have done it is have both dogs on long lines. 15 feet I think is sufficient but still allows for some control. I let the dogs do their own thing for the most part, since with this method it would be important to know that both dogs are dog friendly. However, I take precaution in how they approach each other. I usually have one person come in from one side, and the other come in at a sideways angle to that, so they aren't directly facing each other and doing a more appropriate sideways greeting. I watch closely for any tensing, ear flicks, tongue licks, posturing, etc and redirect if necessary.
Perfect the is a great way to do it. Bring dogs on walks together gives them a sense of being in a pack. This feeling of being in a pack can be hard when it comes to training. I have always brought my dogs to meet in new territory's on leash first then off. I play with all dogs together give them something to focus on besides each other.

I love +twos way go with that.
 

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Sorry Labmom... didn't really answer the question so much. I would see if the rescue can bring the pup to your daughters house and then take both of them on a walk. If they do well together on a 30 or so minute walk, then let them into the backyard together. You can leave the leashes dragging if you want, but some people don't prefer that.
 

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or drive your dog to the rescue, walk your dog around the rescue area and have someone else walk the rescue dog......... Or meet at local park?

I agree that meeting on neutral territory is best, and that walking them near each other, but it's true that if you have a leash agressive dog then you can have issues that you'd never have if they were off leash. But seems easiest to start on leash, waling them in the manner described above.....
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Great advice! Thanks all. I shouldn't be so paranoid about it; childhood dog-fight traumas that I cant quite shake. Maybe I should go on Dr. Phil or something and get cured. LOL! I like the walking idea, +two :) Sounds like a good idea I hadn't thought of.
 

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I've always walked my dogs briskly for about 45 min, then do the same with the new one. Then get all of the dogs and go for a brisk 20 min walk...no stopping to sniff. They seem to start the walk as strangers and finish the walk as members of the "pack". I then go out back to the fenced yard (I've picked up toys/treats/food) and drop the new dog's leash, and let them roam while I walk my dogs around on leashes. When everyone seems ok, I'll drop my dog's leashes and try to observe from a little ways away. Never had any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
They brought him home last night and followed this advice. It worked perfectly :) Ringo (Star) and (Bob) Dylan are getting along wonderfully! *fingers crossed*
 
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