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We are looking in the next 4 years or so into buying a house in Maine. My main thing is we fence in the yard.

Once we settle we plan on getting a Newfie, so it'll need to be able to withstand a large dog. Plus we have our beagle mix Copper whose got high prey drive, energy like the energizer bunny and has pogo sticks for legs. So the fence will probably have to be 7 foot tall minimum with some of it buried to prevent one of them from digging under. Having an existing fence would be nice but I'm willing to build one if need.

So what are some cheaper but non climable fencing methods?
 

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Put up a physical fence and back it up with an electronic fence. This will keep the dogs away from the fence altogether while preventing wildlife and other dogs from coming in. I suggest non climb Red Brand horse fence. It comes in different heights and must be stretched with a come-along or a tractor. You can also use plain electric fence along the top and around the bottom (have to keep wees off it). Use wither rough locust posts (last 20 years untreated) or use pressure treated posts labeled for underground use.

I also suggest, for when you cannot watch the dogs in the yard, s purchasing regular 5X10 or 10X10 welded wire (NOT chain link) dog kennels installed on a low deck and "U" bolted down. These should have secure tops (same panels the sides are made of and clamped on top). If the kennels are installed inside a structure with a slanted metal roof, you won't have to shovel them out in winter.
 

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A wooden privacy fence is probably the most affordable, as well as the safest. Most dogs tend not to want to jump over anything if they can't see whats on the other side. Not all, but most. Newfies...I kinda doubt they would be that incredibly motivated to jump a 7 ft fence. They're big and heavy. Bury some chicken wire a couple feet out from the base of the fence, and that deters most dogs from digging under. Also, simply keeping an eye on them (especially if you know you have a digger) is always a good plan. If jumping does become a problem, you could probably install coyote rollers along the top of the fence. Most dogs need to kind of 'grab' the top of a high fence to help themselves over, so coyote rollers prevent them from using that leverage.

Also, think about objects near the fence. Trees, buildings, something the dog could use to propel themselves over. Watch those videos of "dog escape artists" to see what I mean, lol!
 

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A wooden privacy fence is probably the most affordable, as well as the safest. Most dogs tend not to want to jump over anything if they can't see whats on the other side. Not all, but most. Newfies...I kinda doubt they would be that incredibly motivated to jump a 7 ft fence. They're big and heavy. Bury some chicken wire a couple feet out from the base of the fence, and that deters most dogs from digging under. Also, simply keeping an eye on them (especially if you know you have a digger) is always a good plan. If jumping does become a problem, you could probably install coyote rollers along the top of the fence. Most dogs need to kind of 'grab' the top of a high fence to help themselves over, so coyote rollers prevent them from using that leverage.

Also, think about objects near the fence. Trees, buildings, something the dog could use to propel themselves over. Watch those videos of "dog escape artists" to see what I mean, lol!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A wooden privacy fence is probably the most affordable, as well as the safest. Most dogs tend not to want to jump over anything if they can't see whats on the other side. Not all, but most. Newfies...I kinda doubt they would be that incredibly motivated to jump a 7 ft fence. They're big and heavy. Bury some chicken wire a couple feet out from the base of the fence, and that deters most dogs from digging under. Also, simply keeping an eye on them (especially if you know you have a digger) is always a good plan. If jumping does become a problem, you could probably install coyote rollers along the top of the fence. Most dogs need to kind of 'grab' the top of a high fence to help themselves over, so coyote rollers prevent them from using that leverage.

Also, think about objects near the fence. Trees, buildings, something the dog could use to propel themselves over. Watch those videos of "dog escape artists" to see what I mean, lol!
I doubt ad well with Newfies but I know some breeds are leaners. They like to lean on stuff, kind of what I meant. Off lead i don't trust Copper for nothing so I'm taking every precaution I can
 

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Lilith's idea about the wooden fence with buried chicken wire is probably the best. Not the cheapest, but the best.

Before building you might want to check the local bylaws. Our city has a 6' height restriction for the back yard, and 4' for the front yard.
 

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https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1904119662950653&set=a.404990066196961.112449.100000579142730&type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1842066285822658&set=a.460308710665096.122461.100000579142730&type=3&theater

This is the exact fence and brand that "3GSD" mentioned.. mine is 6ft the heavier gauge and more expensive but so worth it for me because the fence will have to hold to heavy wind, debris (tumble weeds) snow and ice. And my contracted added the top pole railing to finish it using with t-post which I would of never thought you could do ...
 

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https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1904119662950653&set=a.404990066196961.112449.100000579142730&type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1842066285822658&set=a.460308710665096.122461.100000579142730&type=3&theater

This is the exact fence and brand that "3GSD" mentioned.. mine is 6ft the heavier gauge and more expensive but so worth it for me because the fence will have to hold to heavy wind, debris (tumble weeds) snow and ice. And my contracted added the top pole railing to finish it using with t-post which I would of never thought you could do ...
 
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