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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I posted a while back asking what breed would be best for us as my husband at the time had never had dogs before and was looking for a running companion. We ended up getting the sweetest smooth collie. She is such a joy and provides us with love and friendship - but she is a god-awful running buddy! My husband is already talking about getting another pup since our collie has been so wonderful - she's super velcro, mild-mannered, agreeable, and very biddable - a perfect first dog. But this time we would definitely like to go for a dog who is truly renowned for their running ability, since collies are not exactly known for their endurance.

Our requirements:
1. Must be able to keep up for at least 3 miles of hard running. Being able to go up to 10 miles would be awesome. My husband runs anywhere from 2-15 miles a night, depending on if he's training for a marathon. When he's not training, he runs about 15-20 miles a week, and when he's training he does around 35 miles a week.
2. Must be cat-friendly
3. Must have an accessible off-switch, since we are couch potatoes in the truest sense of the word when we are not being active. With our collie we walk with her about an hour a day plus any running my husband can coax her to do, which ends up being about 30 minutes to do 1.5 miles or so (she is SLOW). I take her off-leash hiking in the woods every Sat and Sun for about 2 hours each day. She also gets doggy daycare time as well as obedience class once a week. Our new pup would likely have the same schedule except adding on additional time for distance running. When we are not exercising, we spend most of our time in front of the computer and would expect our pup to relax with us.
4. Must be biddable and good off-leash. I like that our collie loves to please and is very easy to train.
5. Must be a velcro dog who is demonstrative with their affection and actively seeks cuddles. A rough-and-tumble kind of dog would be nice, since our current can be reserved at times.

I am also flirting with the idea of pursuing some kind of dog sport with our next dog (maybe agility or flyball). I've never participated in dog sports before, but I'd be interested in trying. Running ability and athleticism would be a higher priority than this, though.

Breeds I am currently thinking about: Vizsla, GSP, Aussie, Brittany, Toller. I would like to steer clear of curly-coated breeds due to the grooming, as well as dogs that are susceptible to BSL.

Any thoughts? Thanks!
 

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I was thinking GSP even before I got to the end of the post, LOL. Or a field-bred Lab. A lighter-built sporting dog anyway.

Keep in mind that no dog should be doing distance running or much running on pavement until their bones and joints are fully developed---around 18 months.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Keep in mind that no dog should be doing distance running or much running on pavement until their bones and joints are fully developed---around 18 months.
Yup, I am aware of that. We're leaning towards adopting an adult. We got our collie pup as a 2 year old, and I am loving having skipped the puppy phase.
 

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My first thought was a Vizsla. They are very velcro, active, intelligent, the ones I know are good off leash, and willing to please. I know quite a few in agility that do well.

Keep in mind any puppy should not be doing much forced exercised until they are full grown. Also, the dog will have to build up to several miles, just like a person. You might do well to just adopt an active adult dog.

Edit - Annd you all beat me to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I was thinking GSP even before I got to the end of the post, LOL. Or a field-bred Lab. A lighter-built sporting dog anyway.
By the way do you think a GSP or field-bred Lab would have TOO much energy? Or do you think they would have a good off-switch? Our collie settles very well when we're doing nothing at home, and it'd be nice if our next dog would behave similarly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My first thought was a Vizsla. They are very velcro, active, intelligent, the ones I know are good off leash, and willing to please. I know quite a few in agility that do well.
Awesome!! Vizslas in agility - really? That's very cool. I normally think of herders (or poodles/paps for smaller breeds) as being the go-to agility dogs. I'd think that a Vizsla wouldn't be great at agility since they are so lanky and deep-chested. But then again, if I did pursue agility it'd most likely only be for fun, not for hardcore competition.
 

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My first thought when you said couch potato was a greyhound. They're known for being good apartment dogs because they're very calm indoors. Not sure about bidability, but if you're adopting an adult there's tons of retired racers out there, you could probably find one that's been fostered with cats.

Edit: just realized you want a good off leash dog. a sighthound may not be your best pick.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My first thought when you said couch potato was a greyhound. They're known for being good apartment dogs because they're very calm indoors. Not sure about bidability, but if you're adopting an adult there's tons of retired racers out there, you could probably find one that's been fostered with cats.
I like greyhounds, but they definitely could not keep up with any type of distance running. They can be athletic but are more known for sprinting than for their endurance. Biddability is low in this breed, too. Sad, because I adore sighthounds. Maybe we'll have one in the future when we're looking for much more of a couch potatoey dog! I would love a grey or a silken windhound someday - the silkens are supposed to be a little more energetic, too.
 

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Awesome!! Vizslas in agility - really? That's very cool. I normally think of herders (or poodles/paps for smaller breeds) as being the go-to agility dogs. I'd think that a Vizsla wouldn't be great at agility since they are so lanky and deep-chested. But then again, if I did pursue agility it'd most likely only be for fun, not for hardcore competition.
Most any breed can do agility and many CAN do well. I see many sporting breeds do pretty darn well. A lot of people choose the herding breeds for obvious reasons.. but choosing one doesn't mean they will actually be successful. Learning to handle is a lot of work and really the biggest thing so all you need is a willing dog.

Really love those Vizslas though. They are seriously growing on me.
 

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My brother/sister-in-law have two vislas. My SIL walks/runs marathons. They are the sweetest dogs, very reliable off leash and she has done some agility with them. This is their second set of vislas and the first two were the most lovely dogs and the oldest even knew directions (left/right) while off leash.
 

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I posted a while back asking what breed would be best for us as my husband at the time had never had dogs before and was looking for a running companion. We ended up getting the sweetest smooth collie. She is such a joy and provides us with love and friendship - but she is a god-awful running buddy! My husband is already talking about getting another pup since our collie has been so wonderful - she's super velcro, mild-mannered, agreeable, and very biddable - a perfect first dog. But this time we would definitely like to go for a dog who is truly renowned for their running ability, since collies are not exactly known for their endurance.

Our requirements:
1. Must be able to keep up for at least 3 miles of hard running. Being able to go up to 10 miles would be awesome. My husband runs anywhere from 2-15 miles a night, depending on if he's training for a marathon. When he's not training, he runs about 15-20 miles a week, and when he's training he does around 35 miles a week.
2. Must be cat-friendly
3. Must have an accessible off-switch, since we are couch potatoes in the truest sense of the word when we are not being active. With our collie we walk with her about an hour a day plus any running my husband can coax her to do, which ends up being about 30 minutes to do 1.5 miles or so (she is SLOW). I take her off-leash hiking in the woods every Sat and Sun for about 2 hours each day. She also gets doggy daycare time as well as obedience class once a week. Our new pup would likely have the same schedule except adding on additional time for distance running. When we are not exercising, we spend most of our time in front of the computer and would expect our pup to relax with us.
4. Must be biddable and good off-leash. I like that our collie loves to please and is very easy to train.
5. Must be a velcro dog who is demonstrative with their affection and actively seeks cuddles. A rough-and-tumble kind of dog would be nice, since our current can be reserved at times.

I am also flirting with the idea of pursuing some kind of dog sport with our next dog (maybe agility or flyball). I've never participated in dog sports before, but I'd be interested in trying. Running ability and athleticism would be a higher priority than this, though.

Breeds I am currently thinking about: Vizsla, GSP, Aussie, Brittany, Toller. I would like to steer clear of curly-coated breeds due to the grooming, as well as dogs that are susceptible to BSL.

Any thoughts? Thanks!
Of the breeds you mentioned, my opinion is the GSP is the best bet.....

ACDs surpass some of your requirements.....


1) Conditioned ACD..... Only ten miles? I thought we were going to run?

2) This is a training thing.... My ACDs past and present live with cats just fine... But they do make a clear distinction between "their" cats and other cats they may see.


3) Can you train and wait a couple of years for the switch to work?

4) they are not particularly biddable... But even poorly trained ones tend to be reliable off leash....

5) A nickname of the breed is "velcro dog" Some are cuddly... Most are not really. But as a whole they NEED to be with their person.
 

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Adult GSP or Visla would work. I've heard Rhodesian Ridgebacks make great running companions but that might be one article creating the hype. Still, they are biddable for hounds and with the proper training. I think GSP/Visla is a surefire bet though. And seconding everything about getting an adult and gradually conditioning it. Not sure if this is possible, but if it's possible to check the dog for health problems before committing, that would be great for you. You don't want a dog lame from a genetic orthopedic problem at 5 years old...
 

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A shorthaired pointer is at my local dog park frequently. The dog never seems to tire out, is very well behaved, and doesn't leave the owners side
 

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Adult GSP or Visla would work. I've heard Rhodesian Ridgebacks make great running companions but that might be one article creating the hype. Still, they are biddable for hounds and with the proper training. I think GSP/Visla is a surefire bet though. And seconding everything about getting an adult and gradually conditioning it. Not sure if this is possible, but if it's possible to check the dog for health problems before committing, that would be great for you. You don't want a dog lame from a genetic orthopedic problem at 5 years old...
Even though Chester is only a presumed RR/RR mix, we have been stopped a fair number of times by RR owners and compared notes and my cousin had a couple back in the day. RR are great runners, good endurance in heat and cold both. Chester would do 10 miles with me and then cool down for a half hour and want to go a couple more miles. We don't run anymore but he's still got pretty good endurance for a dog that's getting older. All the people I talked to with RRs agree they are good running companions.

But really, they don't fit basically anything else on OPs list. They aren't biddable, even compared to other hounds. Generally prey driven so not cat friendly and combining that it being ruled by their nose, not good off leash. Not Velcro at all. Some have a tendancy towards a territorial type aggression, they are the "guardians" of the hound breeds.

They do have a good off switch and are nicely quiet indoors compared to a more vocal hound howl type.
 

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Of the breeds you listed, a Vizsla is possible. My immediate thought was a GSD. They are meant for endurance work at a trot, can most definitely be cat friendly (my dogs live with a cat), obviously velcro, and biddable.
 

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Just be prepared for what happens if your new dog isn't a good running buddy.

you sound like me when I started looking. I wanted a 5k buddy. Then I fell for indy at the humane society. He in theory was a good fit (fox terrier american bully mix) just still a crazy 7m old puppy at the time with no leash training. We never have been able to keep focus well on a run. He sees or smells something interesting and he can go full stop way quicker then me. This has put a damper on the running.

Also keep your climate in mind. With his short coat Indy can overheat easly on >85*F days and isn't a big fan of sub freezing weather either.

I'm no trainer or serious runner but walking the dog has done wonders for my running. Indy on average gets 1mi in the morning and 2mi walk in the evening (longer on weekends) those walks are 85%+ of my training and I pulled off a 1:45 in my second 1/2 marathon and have been doing low 22's for 5k which isn't great but I'd say pretty good for a 33year old desk jockey that didn't exersie until after college. indy is my coach and has pushed me further and harder. I plan on entering my first marathon soon.

(Just in case you didn't try google)
http://www.outsideonline.com/1856881/20-best-dog-breeds-runners#slide-22
http://www.runnersworld.com/running-with-dogs/top-running-dogs
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Of the breeds you mentioned, my opinion is the GSP is the best bet.....

ACDs surpass some of your requirements.....


1) Conditioned ACD..... Only ten miles? I thought we were going to run?

2) This is a training thing.... My ACDs past and present live with cats just fine... But they do make a clear distinction between "their" cats and other cats they may see.


3) Can you train and wait a couple of years for the switch to work?

4) they are not particularly biddable... But even poorly trained ones tend to be reliable off leash....

5) A nickname of the breed is "velcro dog" Some are cuddly... Most are not really. But as a whole they NEED to be with their person.
I have indeed thought of an ACD. After having our collie for the last couple of months, I've found that the herding breed personality really jives with us. But I'd be afraid that ACDs may be a little too much. Ideally we'd have a dog who would not go crazy if they weren't mentally stimulated very much for a couple of days. How much energy does your ACD have, and how much exercise do you do with them every day?

My brother/sister-in-law have two vislas. My SIL walks/runs marathons. They are the sweetest dogs, very reliable off leash and she has done some agility with them. This is their second set of vislas and the first two were the most lovely dogs and the oldest even knew directions (left/right) while off leash.
Awesome, awesome, awesome! I am liking them more the more I hear about them.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Even though Chester is only a presumed RR/RR mix, we have been stopped a fair number of times by RR owners and compared notes and my cousin had a couple back in the day. RR are great runners, good endurance in heat and cold both. Chester would do 10 miles with me and then cool down for a half hour and want to go a couple more miles. We don't run anymore but he's still got pretty good endurance for a dog that's getting older. All the people I talked to with RRs agree they are good running companions.

But really, they don't fit basically anything else on OPs list. They aren't biddable, even compared to other hounds. Generally prey driven so not cat friendly and combining that it being ruled by their nose, not good off leash. Not Velcro at all. Some have a tendancy towards a territorial type aggression, they are the "guardians" of the hound breeds.

They do have a good off switch and are nicely quiet indoors compared to a more vocal hound howl type.
I've thought of a RR and really love the idea of having one since they are such beautiful, athletic creatures. But I don't think we'd go for one for exactly all the points you made. On top of that, they may be just a little too large for us.
 

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Just be prepared for what happens if your new dog isn't a good running buddy.

you sound like me when I started looking. I wanted a 5k buddy. Then I fell for indy at the humane society. He in theory was a good fit (fox terrier american bully mix) just still a crazy 7m old puppy at the time with no leash training. We never have been able to keep focus well on a run. He sees or smells something interesting and he can go full stop way quicker then me. This has put a damper on the running.

Also keep your climate in mind. With his short coat Indy can overheat easly on >85*F days and isn't a big fan of sub freezing weather either.

I'm no trainer or serious runner but walking the dog has done wonders for my running. Indy on average gets 1mi in the morning and 2mi walk in the evening (longer on weekends) those walks are 85%+ of my training and I pulled off a 1:45 in my second 1/2 marathon and have been doing low 22's for 5k which isn't great but I'd say pretty good for a 33year old desk jockey that didn't exersie until after college. indy is my coach and has pushed me further and harder. I plan on entering my first marathon soon.

(Just in case you didn't try google)
http://www.outsideonline.com/1856881/20-best-dog-breeds-runners#slide-22
http://www.runnersworld.com/running-with-dogs/top-running-dogs
Yeah, that's what happened with our current dog. We heard from many smooth collie breeders, "Running buddy? I don't see why not!" only to have our pup be a terrible running companion. The leash seriously inhibits her, and at a point she will stop in her tracks and refuse to go any further. Off-leash she's a bit better, but not by much. She overheats like crazy with her thick, double coat, too. She's great in every other way, though. But this is why I'd like to go for a breed that is known to be good for running this time.
 
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