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Is the "Family Friendly Dog Training" book any good and is it only for puppies or can it work for a 10 month boxer ???
I think it's good for any age, personally. That and Power Of Positive Dog Training both really do a good job of laying things out in a logical order - if you follow their curriculum and put in the practice required, you'll have a very well behaved dog in no time.
 

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Everyone has their own definition of "leadership", with "addendums" depending on the context. It's a pointless practice IMO. All we need to know about our dogs when we train them is...possession of resources follows the 9/10th law; and how, as my dog's guardian, can I maintain control over those resources. Beyond that all we need to know is, do you want more behavior or less? Answering that question does not involve "leadership". You just need a sense for what you want and a means to get there. Coincidentally, your dog wants the same thing.

What the dog is thinking, at the nth degree, regarding a "position" is meant only as an exercise in rhetoric. It has no real application when training a dog.
I agree for the most part, and it seems most of what CM does is just show owners how they are reinforcing the very behavior they don't want, and how to stop doing that and reinforce behavior that they do want. It's really simple stuff IMO. However you want to phrase it or represent it, he phrases it in a way he can get some people to understand, and that's ok.

Not something I've ever needed, I have never read a training book or used a trainer and I've never had a problem with a dog I couldn't figure out a way to resolve. Though I have made some mistakes along the way I regretted, the dogs didn't seem to hold it against me.

As for commercial success, I doubt it's all or even mostly CM that's responsible for that. I always assumed he helped some hollywood type out with a dog and they got an idea to use him to do a show for their own profit, and everyone else from publishers to dog toy companies is just piling on to cash in on his popularity. I'd do the same if given that opportunity.

Now you see a couple of other shows trying to cash in, and I'd expect a few more in the future.

I've decided to actually read a couple training books after coming here and reading though. I read "don't shoot the dog" last week but got limited new information from it. I'm going to read "control unleashed" next and probably the 101 dog tricks book as well.

I'm hoping to maybe pick up a couple of tips or ideas I haven't thought of for strengthening recall from the first, and mainly ideas for behaviors to train from the second.. Any opinions on those two books? Will I be wasting my money?
 

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I've decided to actually read a couple training books after coming here and reading though. I read "don't shoot the dog" last week but got limited new information from it. I'm going to read "control unleashed" next and probably the 101 dog tricks book as well.

I'm hoping to maybe pick up a couple of tips or ideas I haven't thought of for strengthening recall from the first, and mainly ideas for behaviors to train from the second.. Any opinions on those two books? Will I be wasting my money?
Don't forget your local library can be a valuable resource. No need to buy all these books if you can read them for free.

I have to agree with you on Don't Shoot the Dog. It can be an eye opening read, but if you've got your eyes already open, you'll leave feeling empty.

Control Unleashed, however,is an excellent read, with some worth while approaches to include in your dog's training. I'm not too familiar with the 101 dog tricks book.

For recall though, Leslie Nelson's book Really Reliable Recall is excellent.
 

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Don't forget your local library can be a valuable resource. No need to buy all these books if you can read them for free.

I have to agree with you on Don't Shoot the Dog. It can be an eye opening read, but if you've got your eyes already open, you'll leave feeling empty.

Control Unleashed, however,is an excellent read, with some worth while approaches to include in your dog's training. I'm not too familiar with the 101 dog tricks book.

For recall though, Leslie Nelson's book Really Reliable Recall is excellent.
Ahh I had read about really reliable recall, but forgot about it.

That may be better for me than control unleashed.. I think I'll read both. Hope has three strong drives, food, proximity (velcro dog) and prey. Only one of which seems to drive her to recall, not liking to be where I'm not. She's already been reinforced badly for bad recall apparently, lotta work to do and I want to mull over all the ideas I can get.

The 101 dog tricks just sounds like fun ideas for training and a fun way to spend time with my dog and build a really good relationship. Besides who can be afraid of a big GSD if she bows and gives high fives and hides her eyes and such and has fun doing it... Sit, down, get up and gimme five she's learned in our first three weeks, and it's already getting old.

http://www.101dogtricks.com/pages/index.html

BTW the link to the South Park episode was hilarious... There's always a good bit of truth to any good satire.

The other one I was looking over was "natural dog training" and an exercise called "pushing" to get your dog to open up more using prey drive in interacting with you. I may try that as well, and see how she reacts. She's a bit too reserved with me, won't pull playing tug, won't wrestle etc. at all, dunno whether it's lack of confidence with me, or that she's just never played with a human in her 3 yrs.

The only time she gets at all physical is when I come home from work, I actually let her jump on me and get as physical as she wants because it's the only time she actually will.

Pushing link
 

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The other one I was looking over was "natural dog training" and an exercise called "pushing" to get your dog to open up more using prey drive in interacting with you.
Here's a video of my husband doing the pushing exercise with two of our dogs. The one thing he's doing wrong is that he holds up too high on Jaia's neck. He should be resisting down more on his chest. You can see the difference between Jaia and B'asia because I had been working with B'asia quite a bit by this time.

And some think this exercise might encourage eager behavior as regards taking treats, but B'asia takes treats like a deer. She's very gentle under normal circumstances. I always finished the pushing exercise with a few treats using the "easy" command.

Pushing Video
 

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Here's a video of my husband doing the pushing exercise with two of our dogs. The one thing he's doing wrong is that he holds up too high on Jaia's neck. He should be resisting down more on his chest. You can see the difference between Jaia and B'asia because I had been working with B'asia quite a bit by this time.

And some think this exercise might encourage eager behavior as regards taking treats, but B'asia takes treats like a deer. She's very gentle under normal circumstances. I always finished the pushing exercise with a few treats using the "easy" command.

Pushing Video
I tried it a little one night just to see how she would react, and she will push.

Problem being I dunno if I can hold her back, her back legs are stronger than my arm is when I held her at her chest. She's got the leverage.

Question is, what difference has it made in your dog's attitude toward you and will it get the results I'm looking for. Or any bad possibilities anyone has experienced.
 

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I don't know of any bad experiences anyone has reported.

B'asia has a high prey drive and she was very shy and fearful. She's come a long way and pushing was just one of the techniques we used on her. At that time, she would fetch a frisbee, but wouldn't return it or let anyone near her. We were working on getting her to return it and we were successful. She still prefers to hang on to it, but she will give it up if I ask (which I do sometimes to keep her practiced). Basically, Pushing helped her trust us enough to turn her "prey" over to us.

This video was taken at the same time. It's some of the results of our natural dog training techniques we used. B'asia Frisbee
 

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I don't know of any bad experiences anyone has reported.

B'asia has a high prey drive and she was very shy and fearful. She's come a long way and pushing was just one of the techniques we used on her. At that time, she would fetch a frisbee, but wouldn't return it or let anyone near her. We were working on getting her to return it and we were successful. She still prefers to hang on to it, but she will give it up if I ask (which I do sometimes to keep her practiced). Basically, Pushing helped her trust us enough to turn her "prey" over to us.

This video was taken at the same time. It's some of the results of our natural dog training techniques we used. B'asia Frisbee
Hmm, Hope isn't really fearful, just more serious and reserved and a bit cautious but curious of new things, but she almost always goes straight to check it out if something makes her jump or react, she doesn't avoid it.

I just don't know where reserved part is coming from yet, trust, fear of getting hit, just doesn't like the activity or what yet. Then there's the predisone and antibiotics she's on effecting her behavior as well.

It's only been three weeks so I'm not going to worry about it yet, and I'm going to wait until the drugs are gone and then start to work on it in earnest.

She does have a high prey and herding drive. I'd like to use that. She'll -always- chase a tennis ball if I throw it, sometimes she brings it close and drops it a few times, then just chases it and walks away with it when she catches it. But she turns into a different dog when she see a squirrel, focused, alert and turned on. Basically the way all my other dogs were toward me without any effort on my part really..

What other things have you done to build drive and focus besides pushing?
 

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What other things have you done to build drive and focus besides pushing?
We're not trying to build her drive. Just work with it. We play tug, and use several of the techniques and exercises described on the Natural Dog Training page. We use a Flirt Pole (another video), but for focus, I use clicker training.

I believe in variety. :)

Edit: If you decide to use a flirt pole, there are safety precautions you'll want to take. If you want, PM me and I'll type them out. :)
 

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Hmm funny thing happened yesterday. I use a cordless weed eater and Hope heard and saw it and went nuts about it..

She howled and barked and jumped and bit at it, leaped into the air as I tried to keep it away.. I've never seen her do that before...She would go after it till she dropped I think.

Hope a lure pole works that well... I'd like to get her that excited for some kind of toy, preferably a fetch toy like a frisbee or something..

I also ordered the three books I was talking about, I'll post back after I've read them.
 

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Check out the Volhard books, they are excellent.

"Control Unleashed", "When Pigs Fly" and "So your dog's not Lassie" are all great books. "Beyond Basic Obedience"., "Building Blocks for performance" and "Competition Obedience: A Balancing Act" are all superb books.

CM has a lot of good ideas, so I don't totally diss him. I've learned some stuff from him like I have from every other trainer.
 

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Check out the Volhard books, they are excellent.

"Control Unleashed", "When Pigs Fly" and "So your dog's not Lassie" are all great books. "Beyond Basic Obedience"., "Building Blocks for performance" and "Competition Obedience: A Balancing Act" are all superb books.

CM has a lot of good ideas, so I don't totally diss him. I've learned some stuff from him like I have from every other trainer.
When pigs fly looks like a good one.. I read a few pages on amazon's site. I think I'll get that one too.

I finally found one thing that has a higher value than zeroing in on squirrels and such and more than she has for any food so far, the stupid cordless weed eater. She goes nuts for it. Leaping, barking, and I even let her grab the plastic guard and she latches on and tugs it hard.. First time she's pulled on anything like that.

A different dog than I've seen in her yet, all reservedness right out the window.. Reminded me of how my last dog viewed Frisbee and balls.

I couldn't even weedeat the back yard, she would have destroyed the french doors to the back..

Guess ya never know what'll inspire a prey drive. But I need to use that to my advantage somehow. See if I can transfer that drive to something more convenient through association..
 

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I would really, really check out the Volhard "The Cainine Good Citizen: Every dog can be one" book. It covers all of the drives very well, and shows to to use those drives to your advantage.
 

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Some of my favorite books (training, not theory or relationship-building) that I've personally read:

How to Teach a New Dog Old Tricks
Control Unleashed
101 Dog Tricks

And more specialized ones for specific issues:

Click to Calm
Help for your Fearful Dog
Mine! A Guide to Resource Guarding Behavior in Dogs

And, one of my very favorite "books" for basic training isn't a book at all, but Susan Ailsby's Training Levels, which are available online:

http://www.dragonflyllama.com/ DOGS/ Dog1/levels.html
 

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Some of my favorite books (training, not theory or relationship-building) that I've personally read:

How to Teach a New Dog Old Tricks
Control Unleashed
101 Dog Tricks

And more specialized ones for specific issues:

Click to Calm
Help for your Fearful Dog
Mine! A Guide to Resource Guarding Behavior in Dogs

And, one of my very favorite "books" for basic training isn't a book at all, but Susan Ailsby's Training Levels, which are available online:

http://www.dragonflyllama.com/ DOGS/ Dog1/levels.html
Well I picked up 101 dog tricks and control unleashed and have time to read through them a bit.

I was a bit disappointed with control unleashed. It's a good book for some I guess, and a good read, but it's really not for me. A bit too fluffy for me with all the biofeedback and massage and such. I don't know how often I'll be going back to it training my new dog. Seems like maybe a better book for women than men.

101 dog tricks is just the opposite, simple and to the point with tons of illustrations and brief concise explanations, more my style and it'll be helpful, I'll be using it a lot and going back to it many times. But I can see where a person such as a first time owner might not get enough from it to be successful.

I'll be picking up when pigs fly and giving that a read next. The preview pages I read at Amazon were good.

I've had Hope a little over a month now, and now that her ear infections are cured, and the drugs with all the behavioral side effects end this weekend I think between those books I'll have come up with a good training plan for her. Hard to read a new dog and get to know them when you only have one week of a stressed out dog in a new place, and then three weeks of multiple drug behavioral side effects.

So far it's only been working with trust, attention and focus mostly and that has been going very well.

The only big challenge I see in training is her one bad behavioral issue, a very strong prey drive for little furry things like cats and squirrels. I believe she would kill a cat in a second if given the opportunity from her attitude toward them.

Anyone know any good books that deal specifically with that issue? It's going to be a big problem as everyone in my family has cats, most of them live with dogs and aren't particularly scared of them.
 
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