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In about 10 days ill be starting classes at triple crown academe. Now for those of you who have never hear of TCA it is the largest dog trainer academy in the world, and is located right by Austin Texas in a small town called Hutto. I really would love to go beyond my instructors expectations when I’m down there, and would be more then willing to help anyone on the weekends with there dogs to better myself as a trainer. If your in the Austin area, and after my first four weeks of basic dog obedience are complete I would be more then willing to help you all…. So feel free to ask me…

Also I’m not sure how many trainers frequent this forum, but after in done with school it would be great to be taken under someone’s wing and allowed to do an apprenticeship with them… I really have no problem with moving a crossed the country either so if that’s something that you would be interested in let me know. As of now I have a fire science degree and would really like to get into training bomb dogs and search and rescue, however I’m an avid hunter and training hunting dogs would also be enjoyable to me.

Anyway my name is Justin and I hope that within a few months ill be able to help everyone here with there dog training needs here on the forum…
 

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What kind of dog do you have? For me personally, I couldn't care less what kind of training you have, I want to know what dogs you've trained. Your own personal, trained dog goes a long way there in my book.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
What kind of dog do you have? For me personally, I couldn't care less what kind of training you have, I want to know what dogs you've trained. Your own personal, trained dog goes a long way there in my book.


Just out of curiosity are you a trainer hulkmaniac?

This is my dog sobe…

thx's to goes out to who ever croped this pic for me... im guessing one of the mods?!?!?
 

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I'm not. I'm speaking solely as a consumer. I train my dogs to do stuff, but that's it. Also, don't call yourself a professional. You'll start a 12 page thread. :)
 

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After you complete you training at school your idea's will change.Becomming a dog instructor is a lot of work. Training hunting dog is one thing but with dogs there are all kind if dog instructors. You got Rally,Obedience,Fly Ball,and the list goes on and on.A good instructor is hard to come by at times.Lots and Lots of work.At National level now that seperates a lot of them.You got to do your homework on what you want to do.Have you ever join a club and train a dog in Obedience and competed.Now that lots of work.It will take a lot more then 4 weeks of school to make you a decent dog instructor.That would not even cover Basic dog training.Its along hard road.
 

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I'm working very slowly towards the same goal. Right now I have my dog enrolled in obedience and agility classes. It is definately the people that are the challenge. Training the dogs is the easy part, training the people well that's the hard part!! I've really been watching the owners and some can follow instructions and it shows in their dogs and well others...ummm they just don't get it. Nothing difficult to grasp, it's basic obedience.

My local college offers a course in teaching adults, I think that's one course I'm going to take when they offer it again. Maybe once you finish your course at TCA, see if your local colleges offer anything like that unless TCA offers something as part of their course.
 

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I think at times with so called adults you need a ballbat to get them to learn. The last class I was in there were 14 enrolled and after the first week only half showed up. So far only two have been there all the time.Dam near need to be a drill instructor. A lot o hard heads. I enjoy the classes. My dog is sharper then me. He makes me look good at times. I think I drag him down.
 

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I do understand what you're trying to say, but it's a little misleading, if the training of dogs was all that easy then probably trainers would not even be needed. Then you would be looking for a new career. Yes, I think dog training is easy, but I think maybe proper dog training is a lot harder than you think. Not meant to offend, it's just the way that I look at dog work.

Training the dogs is the easy part, training the people well that's the hard part!! I've really been watching the owners and some can follow instructions and it shows in their dogs and well others...ummm they just don't get it. Nothing difficult to grasp, it's basic obedience.
 

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What is fire science?

I find rather than trying to be a "drill instructor" I get much better responses from my adult students if I teach them the same way I teach the dog.

Show them what I want them to do, tell them how to do it, show them again, and then give it a name. Encourage them when they're doing great. Once they get the basics down, occasionally correct mistakes, while continuing to reward the good behavior. Fortunately since they already speak the same language as me, it's much faster than trying to teach a dog. When I say "please have a sit", they do it 75% of the time as opposed to the untrained dogs which do it maybe 10%. :)

I've learned a LOT over the past few months, and my teaching style and the curriculum I go by has changed a lot. I see more success each time I graduate a class. My last graduating class had 5 dogs. 3 signed up for intermediate, 1 signed up another of their dog for beginner. I also got a $50 tip from one (shhh). Did that happen with my first class? HELL NO. It took working with LOTS of dogs and LOTS of people to get where I am today and I still have a LONG LONG LONG way to go.

For me, once I started teaching, I had a lot less time to work with my own dog. I had planned on having Sadie in an agility class by now and we haven't worked on agility behaviors in months. :( And I'm about to start full-time hours, so it'll be even harder.

Read a lot, talk to as many other trainers as you can, take other classes with your own dog, and keep an open mind. Learn, grow and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I appreciate everyone’s advise… I’ve tried to put myself into every available opportunity to learn how to train dogs, however there just aren’t many in small town Iowa… I was a animal care taker at a local vets office for over 7 years (keep in mind I’m only 22), and that helped me to learn how to work with the different temperaments of animals… I’ve also worked with a trainer before, however I thought his methods where somewhat abusive (he was shock collar happy) and I also started my own company called “Petmanny” where I did in home pet sitting… and surprisingly to me it blew up and was very successful


So now I’m off to school and believe me I plan on working my @ss off… never in my life has anything came easy not a single opportunity has presented its self for me to become a dog trainer… so now I’m going to make that opportunity happen…
 

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What is fire science?

I find rather than trying to be a "drill instructor" I get much better responses from my adult students if I teach them the same way I teach the dog.

Show them what I want them to do, tell them how to do it, show them again, and then give it a name. Encourage them when they're doing great. Once they get the basics down, occasionally correct mistakes, while continuing to reward the good behavior. Fortunately since they already speak the same language as me, it's much faster than trying to teach a dog. When I say "please have a sit", they do it 75% of the time as opposed to the untrained dogs which do it maybe 10%. :)

I've learned a LOT over the past few months, and my teaching style and the curriculum I go by has changed a lot. I see more success each time I graduate a class. My last graduating class had 5 dogs. 3 signed up for intermediate, 1 signed up another of their dog for beginner. I also got a $50 tip from one (shhh). Did that happen with my first class? HELL NO. It took working with LOTS of dogs and LOTS of people to get where I am today and I still have a LONG LONG LONG way to go.

For me, once I started teaching, I had a lot less time to work with my own dog. I had planned on having Sadie in an agility class by now and we haven't worked on agility behaviors in months. :( And I'm about to start full-time hours, so it'll be even harder.

Read a lot, talk to as many other trainers as you can, take other classes with your own dog, and keep an open mind. Learn, grow and have fun.
Exactly, what it's all about.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
What is fire science?
Its practically the same thing as police science, but for firefighters… and that’s why I feel I would be a good at working with bomb dogs, and search and rescue. I’ve already taken many classes on both subjects…
 
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