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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been reading about how many people do not consider this a good breed and have even seen people scold others for owning them by claiming it's a designer breed and irresponsible, i have read of behavioral issues and how there are better breeds out there.

I rescued a Beagle/lab puppy about 7 months ago at my local wallmart (for free) from a couple who had a neighbor with a Lab who got lose and mated with their beagle, then about 2 weeks later i decided that she should have a companion so i rescued another puppy of the same breed and age so that she could have a friend to pal around with.

They are both now about 7 months old and so far they have been great animals, i find that they are very very intelligent and always wanting to learn something new, once i began teaching them various tricks and training them they really blossomed.

The potty training was on the tough side but they both caught on eventually and have not had an accident in forever, everything else with the exception of the leash was a breeze, i was shocked it was so easy considering all the stories i have heard about how stubborn beagles can be, i found that all i needed was a couple of treats and they would learn in no time flat.

I had almost zero trouble with them chewing things they should not chew and they never once destroyed anything of any value, all it took was some toys for them and a couple bones for them to chew on.

They both learned the sit command together and learned it on only the first try, i was amazed at how all i had to do was show them how to sit, give the hand signal and then give them a reward, after that, they did it on their own every time with just the command and signal.

The did the same with the "Lay down" command as well. "Stay" took about an hour for them to master, for dogs that love food as much as they do, they really surprised me at how i could place a tasty snack on the ground and walk away without them going after it until i told them they could.

I know some people will tell me that this is the wrong thing to do but, for the past 6 months i let my dogs on the furniture and i let them sleep at the foot of my bed, when they went into heat (because of the bleeding cycle) i was able to stop them from jumping on the furniture with almost zero effort, a couple corrections was all it took for them to understand.

i have trained them with ease not to beg for food and to keep away while i am eating, i did this by giving them a small food reward AFTER i am done eating, now they just find a spot and lay down while waiting for me to finish, when i get up to put my plate in the kitchen they will get up as well and follow me in for a snack.

it took only a half hour to teach them not to jump up on guests, now they will come over to the door when people arrive, sit down and wait for their attention.


I KNOW for sure i will get many replies on this part of my thread since the big rule about beagles is to ALWAYS keep them on a leash but I'm going to say it anyhow, one of my dogs does quite well outside while off her leash, i think the lab part must be stronger than the beagle part in her, i have taught her the boundaries (the front lawn and driveway) and she seems to accept them, once in a while she might take a step or two over them while sniffing around but all i have to do is say her name and tell her "back up" and she will return almost instantly.

The only thing i have to work on as of right now is leash training since the beagle part of them likes to follow their nose and them barking at people through the window as the walk by. other than that, it has been easy, they would be trained in these areas as well had i not slacked on it.

Anyhow, to sum it all up, these 2 dogs have been exceptional pets, if you are going to rescue a dog and you happen to see a beagle/lab, i would encourage you to take it home
 

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I adore Beagles with a passion and have an almost equal love for Labs, but your dogs clearly lean towards the Lab side of the mix, training-wise.

They are GREAT dogs but I can guarantee you beyond a doubt that a Beagle-dominant mix would not learn "sit" with stimulus control and treats faded after being lured once.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I adore Beagles with a passion and have an almost equal love for Labs, but your dogs clearly lean towards the Lab side of the mix, training-wise.

They are GREAT dogs but I can guarantee you beyond a doubt that a Beagle-dominant mix would not learn "sit" with stimulus control and treats faded after being lured once.
I'm not 100% sure what you mean, are referring to the hand gesture and being lured to do so by the prospect of a treat?

if so, i still treat them at random times for doing what they are told to do, that way the thought of maybe getting a snack urges them to obey me. btw, here is some pictures of them.







 

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Your dogs are very cute. :)

By that I mean it is near impossible for a Beagle-dominant mix to be able to sit reliably on cue, without treats present, in a variety of different scenarios, after having been shown what to do only once.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ahhh i see, that must explain why sam (the black and brown one) tends to listen without treats more than the other, i always suspected the lab was much more dominant in her.
 

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I haven't heard a lot of "bad things" about beagle/lab mixes but I do know scent hounds (mixed or pure) can be a challenge to train RELIABLY. Doesn't mean they can't or won't learn, just that the nose rules the roost and it takes a lot of work for the handler/owner to properly motivate/reward the dog. They are incredibly food motivated, which can be a good thing, but often a wayward scent or a chance to tree or catch a small animal is going to win over a bisquit. Not impossible, just requires a bit of thought.

I know the local HS doesn't like adopting out hound mixes to apartments because of a propensity of adopters to return because they have gotten in trouble with neighbours/landlords due to the noise and howling of a dog left alone.

My girl is foxhound lab. I love her to death, but teaching recall to her, when there is a small prey animal ANYWHERE nearby or a pile of garbage/dead fish/mud pit/food somewhere within 200 feet, was a real challenge. I did it, and she's reliable off leash but it means me watching like a hawk to anticipate/catch her BEFORE she gets that look in her eye, her nose in the air or on the ground and is off and running because it's MUCH harder to get her to come (though she does) when she's already switched to Nose mode.
 

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I have been reading about how many people do not consider this a good breed and have even seen people scold others for owning them by claiming it's a designer breed and irresponsible, i have read of behavioral issues and how there are better breeds out there.
I don't know too many people who would have a problem with this mix. Assuming temperamentally sound parents, the least you could expect would be a very lovable companion. Labs are #1 in popularity for good reasons, and Beagles are a joy to be around (if not to train).

The beef with the mixed-breed breeds, is more about consumers who pay significant money for what amounts to a very common mutt. It encourages irresponsible breeders to make more of them.
 

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You won't find that anyone has a problem with you having rescued those cuties. The problem is the irresponsible breeders who breed these mixes and call them "beagledors." It's not a breed, it's a designer breed, and it's all about the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You won't find that anyone has a problem with you having rescued those cuties. The problem is the irresponsible breeders who breed these mixes and all them "beagledors." It's not a breed, it's a designer breed, and it's all about the money.
Indeed, i should have mentioned that myself about BUYING "beagledors" as it encouraging back yard breeding. rather than buy them from a breeder you can rescue these dogs all across the country.

Also, the post about them getting that look and their nose going up in the air or low to the ground is dead on, when i let Sam (the black and brown one) off her leash, i still watch like a hawk, stay close and anticipate what she might do.

The other one is off like a race horse any chance she gets so she does not get any off leash privileges like Sam does, I have had way too many impromptu marathon runs when she has escaped out the door.
 
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