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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I am heart-broken. My 4.5 year old BC has been diagnosed as having a mild case of hip dysplasia. :(
I was so worried that this would happen. Logan didn't display any symptoms that I found on line, he just swings his hips forward and back some times. It was enough to get me worried- so we just had some x-rays done. Doctor said out of 10 (10 being the worst), Logan is a 2. So, it's good news and bad news. He said that it "won't shorten his life."
My questions:
Does this get progressively worse? What are signs of pain? What can I do to slow any degenerative changes? Are there any supplements can I can give him? Any exercises that will help?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I'm sorry to hear about your pup. I hope our members who've dealt with this can direct you towards some answers. I have nothing to offer but well wishes.
 

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gee, so sorry you and your dog have to go through hip problems. That's my biggest fear for my Berner girl. I constantly watch how she walks and runs, and sometimes I think she may get up a little slow. there are supplements to help that are natural as well as drugs from the vet but unfortunately the drugs can have side affects. I'm thinking my last dog, a Shepard cross kidneys failed from side affects but it did wonders for her and she lived to be 13 years.Hard to say if it was the drugs or just from aging
 

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Get some MSM and Glucosamine and Chondrotin supplements asap! Those will definitely help, especially in a mild case. They aren't a cure-all but a lot of people have noticed huge improvements after starting them. You can also ask your vet about adequan injections but if he's rating the hips 2/10 then they probably aren't necessary at this point.

Outside of that if you are willing you could try to find a doggy chiropractor and see if that helps, I've heard of people having great results.

HD can lead to arthritis so you want to try to keep the joints in the best shape possible, hence the MSM, Glucosamine, and Chondrotin. Adequan if/when it becomes necessary helps to lubricate the joints, but it requires semi-frequent injections (every two to three weeks), so best to wait till your pup really needs it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for all of your kind words and advice regarding supplements and exercise. The vet did say that meds weren't necessary at this point, but would be when the time comes. When he said that "it won't shorten his life," was he saying that he didn't think that the pain would be so bad that we would have to put him down?
The vet also told me that I can't rollerblade/bike with him unless he can run on the grass or gravel. He also said that you shouldn't even run a healthy dog on the road. Am I stupid or just uninformed like others? I feel so bad- I run him everyday for 20-30 minutes on the street (as well as my other dog). I could have made it worse and I never knew it! I feel such guilt and sadness.
 

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My Clifford has severe HD.

Find an orthopedic vet. Do this not because your regular vet isn't awesome, but because a specialist is going to have more information on this specific problem and you are eventually going to need that.

Keep your dog on the slender side. Even the tiniest bit of extra weight adds unnecessary stress to the bad joints. Of course, be careful that you aren't going overboard and starving your pooch!

Gentle exercise is an absolute must for dogs with HD, because it keeps the joints from stiffening. I would probably never run with a dog who had been diagnosed with HD, but I would definitely keep up the walks and I would also start looking for a place to go swimming. Running on hard surfaces is bad for everyone's joints, not just dogs. That's why we humans buy fancy running shoes and use treadmills or jogging tracks. Still, in the grand scheme of things running on the sidewalk or street is just not that big a deal for a healthy dog. It IS a big deal for a dog with HD because it puts unnecessary stress on joints that are already weak. Also make sure to stay away from too much exercise all at once (maybe split one long walk into two shorter ones) and any activities that involve jumping.

As mentioned by another poster, HD causes arthritis, so joint supplements are definitely in order. They can't stop the progression of either issue, but they can slow it. A supplement with glucosamine, chondroitin, MSM, omega 3 fatty acids (usually found in fish and flaxseed), and vitamin C in it is going to be the best combination. The dosage listed on the bottles of most canine joint supplements are too low, so talk to your vet (or that orthopedic specialist I mentioned earlier) about what amount a dog of your size should actually take.

Buy a bottle of canine aspirin. You can get this OTC and it is nice to have on hand for bad days. Pain can be worse during rapidly changing weather, after extensive exercise, or late at night/early in the morning. You may notice your dog is restless and has trouble settling down when it is in pain. The human OTC painkiller Ascriptin (enteric aspirin) can also be used for this purpose, but you will want to consult your vet before giving any human medicines to your dog.
 

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Hi!

I have a 6month old pup with severe dysplasia. The best signs that I can advise are a swager (as that's the only thing I can think to call it) as it first presented and started to get worse. He didn't walk normal, he walked with a swager in the back.

Now as it's progressed he does a bunny hop when moving. He keeps both rear legs together and doesn't walk, but hops along keeping the weight off the rear hip that is the worst.

When he wants to play, he lays down, will never play standing. Where as my 8 yo pup will always play standing or in play pounce position (butt in the air, front down on the ground).

He will not sit with weight on that back hip, he is always leaning to the other side. He does not sit in a sphynx like position either, he's always got his rear legs straight out (as if on his side) and his front up on like normal.

Kai has a pain pill that he takes to manage that, but the bunny hop, sitting & laying positions, play position, etc all remain the same even with the pain eliminated (or aleviated) as his hip just isn't built to move like it should with the severe dysplasia.

FilleBelle has excellent information on HD as well.

Kai takes Cosequin (1 pill a day) as a supplement to help his joints stay as healthy as possible. This was advised by the vet, so you may want to ask yours about such supplements that would work for your pup.

Kai and I have an appointment with an orthopedic vet/surgeon on Monday morning to talk to them about his HD as well as if he's a candidate for THR, maitenance in the meantime (as he will need to be fully grown from what I've read before THR), costs, advice, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for your suggestions and empathy. I just couldn't reseach the condition just yet, as I was sure to read about the worst cases- and I am not ready for that.
I am sorry to hear about you Kai's HD. He is too young to suffer so badly.
Sometimes one hip is worse than the other? My vet didn't say what side, if any. But I have his xrays on a disk, so maybe I will look at them again (had tears in my eyes the first time) and see if that applies to my sweet Logi.
Maybe I will get an orthopedic vet for Logan. My vet said a couple of things yesterday that I found somewhat disturbing (contradictory). I will also keep his weight down as it is only common sense that an extra couple of pounds will be hard on him (he weighs 46 pounds- he is also pretty tall for a BC- little over 23 inches at the withers).
Thanks for the support.
 

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My last dog had HD

Get him on Glucosamine\chondriotin\msm supplements

Buy some doggie aspirin, or a bottle of baby aspirin. Ask your vet about long term anti-inflammatories\pain relievers.

Ask the vet about surgerys that can alleviate pain (should it come to that); My previous dog had a surgury that removed her femeral head. Seek out a specialist if you can.

Don't let him run too much on hard surfaces; if you have concrete run, get rubber matting, or the like, to limit how much strain is on his joints, especially when he lays down.

Make sure he always has a nice soft bed to lay on; if you allow him on your bed, you may want to reconsider, especially because this is a progressive 'disease'.

Try to limit how much jumping he does, especially jumping "up"; like when a dog jumps up in greetings.

If you're active in agility, you will want to slow down! Try Rally, if you still want to show, as it is still an 'active' thing, but not nearly as strenuous, and toiling on the joints as agility is.

Hydrotherapy is fabulous for HD dogs, because they can still exercise, to stay fit, and it is easy on the joints.
 

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Get him on Glucosamine\chondriotin\msm supplements

Ask the vet about surgerys that can alleviate pain (should it come to that); My previous dog had a surgury that removed her femeral head.

Don't let him run too much on hard surfaces; if you have concrete run, get rubber matting, or the like, to limit how much strain is on his joints, especially when he lays down.

Make sure he always has a nice soft bed to lay on; if you allow him on your bed, you may want to reconsider, especially because this is a progressive 'disease'.

Try to limit how much jumping he does, especially jumping "up"; like when a dog jumps up in greetings.

If you're active in agility, you will want to slow down! Try Rally, if you still want to show, as it is still an 'active' thing, but not nearly as strenuous, and toiling on the joints as agility is.

Hydrotherapy is fabulous for HD dogs, because they can still exercise, to stay fit, and it is easy on the joints.
He's on a joint supplement

The FHO is not recommended for him due to what he'll weigh full grown and his leg muscle not able to support him.

He's not running at all by his own choice, but we do walks

He's never jumped on anything, the bed, people, counters, he just doesn't go up on his hind legs because of this and never has.

If he's on the bed with me, I've put him there and gotten him down.

His crate has a very nice comfy blanket in it for him.

I've learned very quickly just how progressive this disease is...in just 2 months time...it's very sad.


EDIT!! I just realized this was the OTHER HD puppy thread and not mine! LOL Sorry about that, responded to Love's Sophie as if it was on my thread :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I ordered some Cosequin DS chewables last night. How much should I give him daily? 2 or 1 chewable? Maybe 1.5?
 

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I ordered some Cosequin DS chewables last night. How much should I give him daily? 2 or 1 chewable? Maybe 1.5?
I would *always* double check with a vet. I don't know your dogs breed, weight, etc, nor am I a vet myself, just another loving owner going through the same thing :)

Kai is a 50+ pound 6 month old Malamute, and was told by my vet to not follow the bottle, and to only give him one a day. If say, I gave him one, and the roommate gave him one not realizing I already had, no harm done, just not neccissary since his hip was already so severe. The purpose is to help keep it as healthy and in the best possible condition as possible, along with the rest of his joints.
 
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