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My little mini doxie Daisy defended me from a bat a few minutes ago. I tried to put her in another room to deal with it, but she was frantic and pushed the door open (my bedroom door doesn't lock). I knocked it down and she attacked it. The bat definitely got the worst of it, but she appears to have a very small gash near her nose, possibly a bite? It isn't even bleeding anymore.

She is up to date on her rabies vax. Are there other diseases to worry about? Do I need to take her in immediately to get checked? The bat is gone, he was still alive and kicking so he got released outside.
 

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put bat in a baggy, put in freezer. call health dept in am.
She let the bat go.

I would absolutely be calling the vet/getting in ASAP
 

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I have to share with you my bat story. We had a bat in our house and after catching it, believed the bat had been in the house for about a week. I disposed of it the next day right before our trash pickup arrived. We then visited my sons pediatrician for something unrelated and shared the story. He advised us to call the Mass dept of public health as soon as possible. A specialist from the dept stated that we were a low risk of being exposed to rabies since nobody experienced a bite, however, if the bat was in the house for a week, it could have bitten us at night and we would be unaware of it because the bites are so small, but this is also unlikely. Even if bitten, the odds of a bat being positive for rabies are very low. Then went on to tell us that once someone exhibits symptoms of rabies, it is too late to treat and 99.99% fatal. After saying all of this, stated that they couldn't advise us whether or not to get rabies shots because nobody witnessed a bite, only that we were a low risk. We decided to get the shots for the entire family. We learned very shortly that we also had multiple bat colonies that were living in the eves of our attic and hired a specialist to remove the colonies.
I agree with the comment above, I would call the vet. Even if the rabies vaccine is current, they may want to give a booster shot. Good luck.
 

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For future reference, you should keep the bat and contact your state health department for rabies testing. When there's a potential human exposure (which essentially this was) most states will test for free.

With a current rabies vaccine, your dog is almost certainly going to be fine. Not something I would lose any sleep over, that's why we vaccinate. Generally it's recommended that the rabies be boosted after a potential exposure, though.
 

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Bats can carry rabies, but very few of them do. If the bat was healthy but just happened to get into your house, I wouldn't worry about it. If it's flopping around on the ground, that's another thing.
PLEASE don't go around exterminating bat colonies! Bats are marvelous amazing creatures as well as eaters of mosquitoes.
 

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It's illegal to exterminate bat colonies anyway. The professional dudes use exclusion methods but even that's not allowed during breeding season. I suppose some people who DIY it don't know the laws and might kill them :/.
 

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The guys we hired sealed the house and put in 1-way doors as the exclusion method. The bats could exit the house but not re-enter. They told us that the bats would find another available opening to call their home, likely someone elses house and the cycle continues.
 

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The guys we hired sealed the house and put in 1-way doors as the exclusion method. The bats could exit the house but not re-enter. They told us that the bats would find another available opening to call their home, likely someone elses house and the cycle continues.
It would be kinder and better ecologically to provide a bat house when you exclude bats from your house. Bat populations are not doing well in many places, while flying (and biting) insect populations thrive.

I'm sure it's unintentional and I don't mean to point at anyone or criticize, but the title of this thread, "Bat Attack :( " suggests fear and loathing that bats don't deserve. They are marvelous, fascinating creatures. Also a bit of trivia: There are ~ 925 species of bats. That's ~ 20% of all known living mammal species. Bats not aggressive . .. unless you're an insect. They are one of a very few taxa that live peacefully in mixed species colonies.
 

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It would be kinder and better ecologically to provide a bat house when you exclude bats from your house. Bat populations are not doing well in many places, while flying (and biting) insect populations thrive.
When all this was happening, we asked about installing bat houses and the bat company we hired told us that it's all media hype and they've never seen the bats relocate to one. They said that in their experience, the bats will reestablish themselves in buildings where they can absorb the radiant heat in the winter time. Not sure if it's true or not, but I agree with you, I would much prefer keeping a mosquito killer.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hey guys, thanks for the advice, I took Daisy in early yesterday and the vet just said there was no need for a booster since her last shot was this year. She just checked the small wound and disinfected it; Daisy seems none the worse for it.

And no, I would never intentionally kill any bats. I usually try to just whirl a towel around in the air and knock them down, then cover them and take them outside. I live in a 150 year old brick house and just have come to accept that one gets inside every once in a while.
 

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"Bat Attack :( " suggests fear and loathing that bats don't deserve.
Sorry certainly not my intention. I was only ticked off with the little fellow because he bit Daisy. I hope he still made it after the attack and is living his happy little batty life eating moths and such.
 

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Sorry certainly not my intention. I was only ticked off with the little fellow because he bit Daisy. I hope he still made it after the attack and is living his happy little batty life eating moths and such.
Understandable. I didn't mean to impune. Just, I'm fond of bats, and like to make it clear that they are gentle creatures. A rabid bat in later stages of the disease, like any rabid animal, will bite madly (is madness aggression?). Vampire bats (not present in the USA except maybe the southern tip of Texas and just a few species among several hundred species of bats) do draw blood but they are gentle in doing so; often they don't wake the 'victim'. You, or your dog, can get bitten picking up a healthy bat, as they will make a puny effort to defend themselves if they can't fly away. But the vast majority of bats, and bat species, live on insects or flower nectar. Attack isn't in their agenda.
 

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I had no idea this was such a popular occurance. My neighbour called me hysterical earlier in the week because there was a bat flying around her living room and she was terrified.
I trapped it in a box and let it go outside no harm done to anyone but I thought it was really bizarre. I don't think I could be as calm about it in my own house.
 

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Many years ago when I lived in New England we had three or four bats suddenly fly down in the middle of a Quaker Meeting. Not everyone kept silence ;-)
 
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