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Hi everyone,

I am looking to adopt my first dog soon. I am looking for a somewhat mellow, laid-back dog, because I'm a mellow, laid-back guy :)

I came across an adorable 2 year old basset/beagle male that i am interested in. I am going this Saturday to hopefully meet him for the first time.

I live by myself in a fairly spacious condo. I don't have a yard of course, but I am across the hall from the stairwell and its only one flight of stairs till i get outside. I'm also walking distance from a dog park. I do have a regular 9-5 job and work overtime, but I live 10 minutes away from the office so I can check on him during lunch breaks and my office allows dogs, so I have the option of bringing him in every once in a while.

I am doing my research of course but I'm posting here to see if some people can tell me more about basset/beagles based off their experiences, especially for a first time dog owner. What should I expect? Will this type of dog work well with my living/work situation?

I'm still a bit hesitant because I've been reading that beagles tend to bark/howl a lot when left alone and with living in a condo that will definitely be a problem. But with this dog being a basset/beagle mix, I'm hoping he didn't inherit that trait :)

Thank you in advance and look forward to reading your replies.
 

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But with this dog being a basset/beagle mix, I'm hoping he didn't inherit that trait
Unfortunately, you can't count on that. Bassets are also pretty vocal.

Both breeds were bred to drive rabbits around in a big circle, back to the owner. They do this with their voices. That voice, in addition to keeping the rabbit moving, alerts the hunter to their position. My beagle used to alert me to his position from about a mile away.

Some hounds have beautiful, melodic voices and some sound like they're being tortured. In either case, and speaking as serious lover of hounds, I would probably jump off very high bridge if I lived in a condo next to a beagle or a beagle/basset.

If that's a deal-breaker for you, you may want to keep looking.

Also, beagles and, surprisingly, basset are high-drive, high-energy dogs - very athletic (unless they are too fat, and then they tend to die young) and require quite a bit of stimulation. A bored hound can entertain your neighbors all day with Irish drinking songs song at a deafening level.

Otherwise, it sounds like a good plan.
 

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I've got a three-year-old beagle/basset mix who, strangely, is almost the polar opposite of what RonE describes.

He only barks when he's super excited (like when I rile him up by running around the house and having him chase me) and the only howling I've ever heard him do is like an old man groan when he stretches/yawns.

His prey drive is not what I would call high, though he would love to chase the rabbit, squirrels and birds we see our walks. We walk about an hour a day, though, so I'm sure that tempers his drive some. He can smell food and hear me open the food container from completely across the entire house, so I know he's got it in him.

I will emphasize strongly, however, I think my dog is a oddball on all these traits. What RonE describes is much closer to your average than mine.

That may or may not help you with relating my experience as a first time owner. So far, he's been a great addition to my house. Like you, live alone and work not far from home, though he is in his kennell 7-8 hours while I'm working because I can't always leave.

Training has been a snap so far. If I only had more time to work with him, he'd be much farther than he is. He's extremely food motivated and has learned some things just with bits of kibble.

Beagles and bassetts are both great dogs. Mild temperment and great with kids. I don't regret getting him whatsoever. But, again, keep in mind he's much quieter and calmer than your average beagle/bassett.

Hopefully, that helps somewhat.
 

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I don't know if I would want a vocal breed in a condo/apartment situation myself.We live in a single family home area with huge yards and the family up the street had beagles they were a real PITA ...Then finally had to re-home them due to noise complaints ect..

I love my Bostons they rarely bark (but as always we work with them from puppy on up that excessive barking is not tolerated)
 

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Both breeds are vocal hunting dogs that love to get out and follow their noses. Neither is one I'd highly recommend for communal/close living or one without a yard. I think RonE pretty much hit the nail on the head.

This individual dog may be the exact opposite of what one would predict, however I wouldn't count on it. Purebreds are known for certain traits for a reason...they are fairly predictable/reliable though individuals within the breed will differ.
 

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If you don't mind a dog that needs to be on a leash I would be more likely to recommend a retired greyhound. These dogs are elegant and sweet from everything I have read about them, but they do need to be kept on a leash and they do need to be walked (but any dog needs to be walked).

Personally, even tho I live in a situation where a hound could howl all day in the house, pigs would fly before I would ever get either a Bassett OR a Beagle... These breeds are bred to be independent and they are. I have heard stories of their house breaking that can be.. well.... Lets just say I really want housebreaking to happen quickly!

This is not to say Bassetts or Beagles are not good dogs.. just saying these breeds are not good dogs for me. I know my limitations... :)
 

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Personally, even tho I live in a situation where a hound could howl all day in the house, pigs would fly before I would ever get either a Bassett OR a Beagle... These breeds are bred to be independent and they are. I have heard stories of their house breaking that can be.. well.... Lets just say I really want housebreaking to happen quickly!
Oh come on!!! Just because YOUR dog is such a smartypants... :rolleyes::D

To the OP: I would also be wary of the vocal factor. I'm not going to say there aren't beagle/basset mixes out there that are nice and quiet. Obviously, there are, and omikeo15 owns one... just like there are huskies that don't howl and Labs that don't need that much exercise. There are exceptions to every breed. In this case, yes, it's possible that this dog isn't a howler, but the odds are against you.

Having said that, it helps that the dog is already 2 years old, so you'll be able to tell if he's an exception to both his breeds or not. Where is he from? A shelter or a previous owner who is rehoming him? I would definitely ask about his barkiness, and look out for any vocalisation.

As for general tips on the breed... well, I only have personal experience with the Beagle side of him. Beagles are very mischievous dogs. They are easily amused and fun-loving, which is wonderful if you're around to channel that into playing games with you or going on outings, but not so wonderful if you can't do this, because then they end up creating their own amusement. This usually involves A) chewing B) barking C) escape attempts or D) all of the above. (In my experience, it's typically D.) They are absolutely wonderful companions but require more mental and physical stimulation than many think.

Training-wise... okay, they're a little hard-headed. They can be stubborn -- a typical Beagle has a "what's in it for me?" attitude towards training, and the answer better involve food or else they'll be high-tailing it out in no time. They also have pretty short attention spans. Oh, and there's the issue of independence; they were quite literally bred to ignore human direction in favour of their nose. This means when a Beagle catches on to a scent, there's very little you can do to throw it off. Extensive training is absolutely necessary for this, of course, but even with a trained Beagle there should be NO off-leash time EVER. This applies to Bassets too, and generally all scenthounds and sighthounds.

But! They are by no means untrainable. They are intelligent when they think something is worth learning; ie when they are motivated. They have a wonderful sense of humour, which can be frustrating when you are luring, but absolutely delightful when you are free shaping. They catch on quickly, but get bored just as quickly. I can say without any doubt that both my girls are an absolute joy to train. (Having said that, I've never trained another dog...maybe ignorance is bliss? :p)

Oh yeah, and they're cute as buttons!

Let us know what you eventually decide :)
 

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Agree with RosemaryNinja.. they are darn cute. ESPECIALLY the puppies. They can sucker you RIGHT in.... A litter of Beagle Puppies is almost and instant "can I have them ALL???" :D Real Trouble there. LOL

I think they plan it like that. Never suggested they lacked brains!! :p
 

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A litter of Beagle Puppies is almost and instant "can I have them ALL???"
That's called a pack and they can really get a chorus going.

When I was a ruthless, bloodthirsty rabbit-killer, I had an opportunity to hunt with our beagle, his mother and a couple of his siblings. What an adventure! All of them singing out in the woods - each with a distinctive voice.
 

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Where is he from? A shelter or a previous owner who is rehoming him?
All I know now is that he came from a rural shelter. I will be meeting him Saturday, hopefully.

Thank you all so much for the wonderful input! I will take all your advice into consideration and will let you know what happens

Thanks!
 

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Agree with RosemaryNinja.. they are darn cute. ESPECIALLY the puppies. They can sucker you RIGHT in.... A litter of Beagle Puppies is almost and instant "can I have them ALL???" :D Real Trouble there. LOL

Agreed. Allow me to refer you to Exhibit A: Honey and siblings at 7 weeks old



(Honey is the one right in the middle, the pup whose body can't be seen. I think.)
 

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To be honest, if I were to think of what the most annoying dog could be, i would def. have to say a basset/beagle mix. As much as i love beagles and basstes for many different reasons, i just could never own either breed b.c of the bark. not so much the fact that they bark a lot (or a little), but just the sound of it. they both resemble the sound angry geese (or dieing geese) make. i just cant handle it. after working with dogs (grooming salons and kennels), and hearing them all the time, i just couldnt own one. I've met plenty of beagle mixes and basset mixes (no beagle/basset yet), and i really cant think of many that arent loud. even the ones who arent loud on a regular bases still do it in moments of excitement, and that would be too much for me.i tell you this as someone who would probably complain if i lived next to a dog that made that sound.

Both breeds have an issue with becoming overweight, so that would probably be a problem for a mix, and regular excercise is a must. both have really big ear issues, and both breeds tend to always have ear infections, so a mix will probably have that problem as well. bassets, more so than beagles, tend to get eye infections as well. if the dog has a more basset build, you have to watch out for all sorts of problems in their legs and back.

however, both breeds are very sweet, and tend to be very close to their owners. im sure a mix would inherit some of that. but its not a lie that the dog will more than likely be a barker.
 

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Haha, that's funny Purplex, because I also work around lots of dogs(doggy daycare) and I've recently grown to love the basset hound bay. Beagles are a bit more annoying, but sometimes hearing that bay when it's completely quiet otherwise, or above all the other "normal" barks, just cracks me up and makes me love them. They're also both very cuddly breeds in my experience. Good luck meeting your pup, kfayoub!
 

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As I mentioned previously, some beagles have a beautiful, melodic voices and some sound like they're being tortured. We had one of the tortured ones living through the block in our old home.

If all the beagles appeared on American Idol, there would be winners and there would be losers.
 

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A friend has a Basset and I adore him.

Would I own one? No.

He is as hard-headed as concrete. There is no training him. Telling him to sit or stay is a waste of time.

He doesnt pee or poop in the house, and will take himself to the terrace and do his business there if its an emergency, but even though he was neutered, he will pee on my floor when he comes to visit. Hes also been known to pee in the hallyway of his apartment building when he gets out.

He is incredibly vocal. He'll bark like crazy, but for the most part, he barks to say 'hi.'

BUT...he is the funniest dog I've ever met, with more personality than you can imagine. He loves to poop in flower beds. He goes to bed at when he's tired. He walks into the bedroom, up the little stairs to the bed, crawls under the covers, pulls up the covers (with his teeth), and puts his head on the pillow.

He sits on your foot when he wants his butt or ears rubbed - which is all the time.

He is friendly and loving and adorable, and my life is richer for having him in my life.
 

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I happen to have two beagles. While they can be high energy, the barking can be trained out. Both mine are quiet unless we are getting there food ready. Training is the key to all.
 

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Wow, there's a lot of Beagle/Basset animosity flying around this thread! Let me just stress here... Beagles are NOT untrainable, loudmouthed, obnoxious dogs who do whatever they want, whenever they want. Honestly. MAYBE breeds like Labs, Goldens and GSDs are really far easier to train -- I wouldn't know. But training my Beagles has never been difficult for me. If I could train one to sit, stay, paw, potty outside and be quiet on cue, at the age of 9 when I had little to no knowledge of dog training, rest assured you will not have any major difficulty.
 

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Wow, there's a lot of Beagle/Basset animosity flying around this thread!
Interesting. I'm seeing a lot of genuine affection.

I don't mean to insult anyone, but training problems usually say more about the trainer than the trainee.

Owning a hound is probably preferable to living next-door to one. As the owner, you have some control of the dog and, yes, hounds can be controlled.

As a neighbor, you are helpless.
 

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I've got a Blue heeler / beagle mix. And I wouldn't trade his dorkyness for anything. Also, he is a huge chick magnet. I'm just praying he didn't inherit the baying trait, lol.

He's a little hard headed, but he loves me. Esp when there's kibble in my hand.
 

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i totally agree about the training. i have known many well trained beagles, and a couple (lol) well trained bassets. and they still had a tendency to bark,more than other dogs, and louder than other dogs. lets say all the dogs at the kennel see the mailman and decide to bark. the beagle is the first one going, and the last one to stop (generally speaking). i know of 2 or 3 that i thought were freaks of nature, they never made a sound, until the owners came to pick them up. youd seriously think that we had tortured them or something, the way they would carry on. so while i know every dog is different, i have yet to meet a beagle or a basset that doesnt bark. even the most well trained ones do it sometimes. like i said, it isnt so much the bark, its the sound of it. when a dog sounds like it is dieing when it is barking, its easy to get over the sound quickly.

and unfortunatly, a lot of people do not train their dogs.
 
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