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Hello everybody. My future puppy is only a week old, so it will probably be quite a while before I start this but I just wanted to have a mind set for when its time.

The dog is a female chocolate lab. I'm not interested in doing bite work or expect the dog to be a gaurd dog or anything. But I was thinking a basic "protect" command and hopefully have the dog face the person and bark and basically look aggressive.

I read something similar to this in a book a while ago, but I have no idea what book it was or anything. Does anybody have any links, videos or anything where I could learn how to train this.

Thanks!
 

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If there is a dog less suitable for protection than a lab, I guess it would be a Newfoundland. Labs are generally just too friendly.
 

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You need a trainer to train this. You might look up some protection trainers in your area and see what their thoughts are. Labs are so goofy and friendly, I don't see them as protection dogs.
 

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Labs tend to be very friendly, as stated, but any dog can protect you; and in my opinion, no matter what breed your faced with, a snarling/barking dog at you will not be welcome to intruders. I don't have any links to help you, but I'm 100% sure it's possible. Take a look around for trainers around your area and get some advice, or try it out yourself if you think you have the skill level to keep the situation under control; if not, than make sure you have a trainer do it for you.

I trained Hunter myself to bark at the door when intruders arrive, but to not bark at people outside who are just passing by. He will also charge someone if I give the command, "get him".
 

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If there is a dog less suitable for protection than a lab, I guess it would be a Newfoundland. Labs are generally just too friendly.
Not that there aren't any protective Labs, but they are so far down the list of appropriate breeds as to make the program a non starter. I have a Golden (close enough for gummint work) and he has an serious sounding bark when someone approaches the house. However, the closer they get to the front door, the more his impressive visage devolves into squeaking and mooing and wagging the rear 2/3rds of his body. It would take someone highly dog-phobic to be frightened off by that pathetic display.
 

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I have a story.

When we had our very large black lab, and had to be out-of-town overnight, we made arrangements for a trusted neighbor to come in to walk him and feed him.

The first time he let himself in with the key we provided, he called to the dog, but saw no sign of him. He went toward the basement family room where the dog was inclined to hang out and, before he got to the bottom of the stairs, he heard a menacing growl which didn't stop when he called out the dog's name.

On further investigation, what he thought was a growl was actually our lab snoring.

I believe strongly that it is our job to protect our dogs - not the other way around.
 

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As many people have said, labs are horrible guard dogs. They're just too friendly by nature. That being said this is something you want to have trained by a professional for liability reasons if nothing else.
 

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I have a breed "known" for barking etc. at strangers. That is the breed.. that is NOT my dog. I taught her to bark on command with "what is it?" It doesn't matter who it is or what, if I say, "what is it?" she will face the "thing" and bark. She will make the "thing" up if she can't see anything there.. just to wo0rk me for the reward IF I give her the 'What Is It cue.'

I made it a game. She does not have her hackles up and she looks back at me as if to ask, "Was that GOOD?" Being a GSD, most people take her seriously.. until they get closer and the Evil Tongue of Slobber passes over their hands and she rubs on them like a cat.... leaving plenty of dog hair.

She also discovered (the first two times anyway) that barking on the "what is it?" in the house made all the cats jump up and look too. She thought that was GREAT fun. They don't do it anymore.. They realized it was all noise.. no substance.

It is fine by me that it is noise and no substance. The person she is barking at doesn't know, nor do they need to.
 

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On further investigation, what he thought was a growl was actually our lab snoring.
Hehe, that made me chuckle.

It is fine by me that it is noise and no substance. The person she is barking at doesn't know, nor do they need to.
That's what I believe as well. You can teach any dog to bark or even growl, but it doesn't make it aggressive and the person who is being barked/growled at probably wouldn't know the difference.
 

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If there is a dog less suitable for protection than a lab, I guess it would be a Newfoundland. Labs are generally just too friendly.
You haven't met my neighbors chocolate Lab. That is one of the meanest dogs I have ever met. Granted it was from a byb but the people are very nice and they have had the puppy since it was a pup. Even they have said they would never get another one. They love their dog but recognize the nasty in their own dog.

I believe strongly that it is our job to protect our dogs - not the other way around.
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I completely agree with that. Dogs are for protecting not protection. IMO
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
A lot of strong opinions here. I tried to make myself pretty clear. A couple of you seem understand what I'd like. I don't mean to get a protection dog or a guard dog. I also know labs to have a fairly intimidating bark. What I would like is to be able to get the dog to bark at someone on command.

This honestly wouldn't do me a whole lot of good, but I have a 5'3 wife and it could potentially help her. Whether the dog is actually protecting her or not, a loud intimidating bark could go a long way.

Thanks for all of the response

the closer they get to the front door, the more his impressive visage devolves into squeaking and mooing and wagging the rear 2/3rds of his body. It would take someone highly dog-phobic to be frightened off by that pathetic display.
I've had Goldens and a golden/lab mix all my life, and thats just too funny!
 

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I would think you just teak the dog to bark on command and then when you wanted it to give a good menacing sounding bark, just give the command. Barking is easy to put on command by capturing the behavior.
 

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A lot of strong opinions here. I tried to make myself pretty clear. A couple of you seem understand what I'd like. I don't mean to get a protection dog or a guard dog. I also know labs to have a fairly intimidating bark. What I would like is to be able to get the dog to bark at someone on command.

This honestly wouldn't do me a whole lot of good, but I have a 5'3 wife and it could potentially help her. Whether the dog is actually protecting her or not, a loud intimidating bark could go a long way.

Thanks for all of the response



I've had Goldens and a golden/lab mix all my life, and thats just too funny!
I understand what you would like to have happen with your future dog. I think the problem is sometimes what we want, we do not get, or what's troubling we get more than we want.

The prudent way to go is to let your pup grow up so you can see what kind of personality the little rascal is endowed with. The line between barking/growling and biting sometimes can get blurred with a pup no matter what the breed is. Puppy time is for socializing and having fun and growing up. I guess what I'm trying to say is let's see what your pup has to offer on his own as there is no rush for this work to begin.
 

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:confused: As a cable guy I've come across a ton of aggressive/barking/growling labs... Ranks up there with healers and pits.
I've seen a fair number of aggressive Labs, myself. The thing that I suspect, though, is that they are all displaying the kind of aggression you never want to see--i.e., aggression that is the result of fear and/or lack of socialization. I don't think I've ever seen an "aggressive" Lab that appeared to be a well balanced representative of the breed.
 

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I've seen a fair number of aggressive Labs, myself. The thing that I suspect, though, is that they are all displaying the kind of aggression you never want to see--i.e., aggression that is the result of fear and/or lack of socialization. I don't think I've ever seen an "aggressive" Lab that appeared to be a well balanced representative of the breed.


I think that would hold true to any breed. An aggressive dog is not a well balanced representative of it's breed, regardless of which breed.

Teaching a dog to bark on command is harmless enough. When teaching it you might want to use a cue like "watch em" if you are going for intimidating. Telling a dog to "speak" wouldn't be too scary. lol
Also keep in mind that in a lawsuit happy world people could say "He is trained to act aggressively" if an accident ever were to occur. Food for thought.
 

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I understand what you would like to have happen with your future dog. I think the problem is sometimes what we want, we do not get, or what's troubling we get more than we want.

The prudent way to go is to let your pup grow up so you can see what kind of personality the little rascal is endowed with. The line between barking/growling and biting sometimes can get blurred with a pup no matter what the breed is. Puppy time is for socializing and having fun and growing up. I guess what I'm trying to say is let's see what your pup has to offer on his own as there is no rush for this work to begin.
I agree with this guy ^^.
 

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One thing you may find is no training will be needed. I've got myself one big 'ol furry cutie that loves everyone and everything, unless your an adult wearing a gorilla suit.... seriously *L, but that's another story. See Taylor doesn't really bark, he will though whimper, whine and even squeeks during the day if he's really gotta fuss over something. At night though he's completly different!! He lets out the wickedest, deepest and long growl that I thought was unreal the first time I heard it! Scared the living bejesus out of me and I was on the phone at 2am to my nearby friend cause I was so scared. It ended up being caused by deer nearby and it happens again every now and then when something get's to close to the house at night.
Sometimes a dog can surprise you when something in them kicks in, I hear the growl a few times a year.... it always wakes me and scares the crap out me and it's my dog *LOL. Goodness knows anyone walking up to my house that saw him in the window doing that would think twice *wink*. So you just might not have to worry about your dog having a little something in him to keep the boogey man away!
 

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One thing you may find is no training will be needed. I've got myself one big 'ol furry cutie that loves everyone and everything, unless your an adult wearing a gorilla suit.... seriously *L, but that's another story. See Taylor doesn't really bark, he will though whimper, whine and even squeeks during the day if he's really gotta fuss over something. At night though he's completly different!! He lets out the wickedest, deepest and long growl that I thought was unreal the first time I heard it! Scared the living bejesus out of me and I was on the phone at 2am to my nearby friend cause I was so scared. It ended up being caused by deer nearby and it happens again every now and then when something get's to close to the house at night.
Sometimes a dog can surprise you when something in them kicks in, I hear the growl a few times a year.... it always wakes me and scares the crap out me and it's my dog *LOL. Goodness knows anyone walking up to my house that saw him in the window doing that would think twice *wink*. So you just might not have to worry about your dog having a little something in him to keep the boogey man away!
That is exactly what I'm talking about, buried in that puppy may be all the dog you need, and it is much better letting the real pup blossom.
 
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