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I have a year and half Lab x Jack Russell bitch. This problem with other dogs only started this January. I have tired to socialized her when she was puppy, but she was nervous and didn't know how to play with other dogs. (I later found out she was the runt of the litter and worked out she was 5wks old when I had her). I think the problem as gone worst since she lost her right eye due to accident.

When she is off the lead she would wag her tail and sniff the other dog, but this isn't always the cause. If the other dog is boisterous she would bark, and nip the other dog before cowarding back to me and hide. Once she knows the dog for a week she would be calm and even play with it, but her barking and lunging when on the lead is scaring people thinking she is vicious which she isn't.

She also really hates Labradors as a lab bit her while we were walking oneday and it made her bleed as well. I have now had her spray as her aggression was lot worse while she was on heat. I also now use a halter on her so I have more control. If the dog don't bark at her first she would listen to me when I use the 'look at me' command.

Oh also she is fine with my father's dogs who she been brought up with since she was a puppy. It's just strange dogs.

Can someone give some tips and training hints on how to help her?
 

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Sounds like she has a bit of leash reactivity. My Ibizan Hound has this due to lack of socializing. We are using classic counter conditioning and it is helping alot! anytime we see a new dog on a walk she gets tons and tons of treats. This teaches her that dogs approaching are good things and it starts to teach her that when another dog approaches she looks to me for treats :) This is not something that you can change overnight, we've been working over a year and still have moments where she feels the need to bark and bounce like a crazy fool lol! The more you can get out and practice the better!
 

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I have tired this and it worked with some of the dogs. But when a dog is really jumpy, boisterous and barking at her, she doesn't care with the treats and just want to lunge to the other dog. There were two dogs one was calm while the other was boisterous and barking at her, they were also two springer spaniels. She even showed her teeth and not wagging her tail, so I knew she was really serious this time. I don't know she was protecting me from the dogs as she is really protective of me during our walks.

I am thinking on taking her training classes, do you think it's too late or would it release her fear a little?

I really don't want to muzzle her as she isn't aggressive dog at all.
 

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I have tired this and it worked with some of the dogs.
It will work..but it does not happen overnight, I have worked with my girl Kiley who is extremely fearful and will bark at dogs and ppl for well over a year and have been able to get her within half a block of dogs without her barking, this is not something that will just happen..it has to keep being worked on, the dog has to understand that they always get the same response. If dogs go nuts, turn around walk away and start over again.
I don't think a training class would be a bad idea as long as you find a good trainer :)
There is a group on FB called DINOS: Dogs in Need of Space..you would probably find alot of helpful hints there!
 

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Some basic advice I hope can help you:

More exercise with your dog (long walks), preferably twice a day until she sees you as her leader. Make her walk next to you and focus on you during the walk, not pulling you. Do this for many days and she will see you as her leader and listen to you more. Get her exhausted!

It sounds like she is insecure, so walk walk walk with her! Drain that energy.

Later you can try adding some corrections while walking, like a tug on the leash.

Let us know how it goes and good luck! :clap2:
 

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Some basic advice I hope can help you:

More exercise with your dog (long walks), preferably twice a day until she sees you as her leader. Make her walk next to you and focus on you during the walk, not pulling you. Do this for many days and she will see you as her leader and listen to you more. Get her exhausted!

It sounds like she is insecure, so walk walk walk with her! Drain that energy.

Later you can try adding some corrections while walking, like a tug on the leash.

Let us know how it goes and good luck! :clap2:
I'll agree with the "insecurity" comment. The rest of it? not so much.

diversedogmom has given some good tips, and leads.
 

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The reason why treats don't always work, especially when she is really "jumpy, boisterous, and barking" is likely due to the fact that you are too close to the other dog for your dog to focus on you. This is known as being "under the threshold." Basically, the threshold is the distance that your dog is from the other dog, when she can be calm and respond to you.

If she is too far gone to listen and respond than she is under her threshold, or too close to the other dog. So, back up, as far as needed, until you can get her to refocus on you. Whatever that distance happens to be is her current threshold. Try to keep her at that threshold, every time you walk her. That means you have to scan the area you're walking in, so that you see other dogs, and can cross the street, or turn down a side street, or whatever it takes to get her to her threshold distance.

Gradually, you can start shrinking that threshold. But, you have to find it first. The thing is, she isn't capable of focusing on you or learning when she is freaking out. So, you first have to get her far enough away so that she can focus and learn.
 

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She gets walked four times a day, an hour in the morning on a short leash, two hours at noon, and she have a longer leash walk so she can sniff at things (through the woods, beach, park and countryside). She as a two hour run in the evening when there is less risk of dogs around (and to get the training 'look at me command into practise') and then lastly an hour walk before bedtime on a short leash.... So the energy wise isn't a problem.

I have bought the Halti training today so I have more control and able to help her. When I get to see the dog coming, I use park cars, stand in front of her and then get her to 'look at me command'. This works wonders and she saw a border collie on walks and we were on the other side. She stopped and had a look at the dog, but she didn't bark at it, which I praise her like mad, and she was jumping and licking at me. [again we use the park car method and slowly when she is relax bring her out to see the dog so have a look and we then carry on walking the other way]

[hr]
Would this be her thershold using this during her walks (it can be hard in the woods and parks though). I always use the other side of the pavement when I spot another dog so she wouldn't feel lot threaten, it is slowly working though. Tonight I tried to used the 'look at me' command and she spotted a Boxer [which she didn't see until it was right oppisate us]. It was on the other side of us and she was 'barking' at it until it disappeared. When we were in the park and there were three dogs, and she barked a little. When I said 'no' firmly she stopped and was 'whinning' and wagging her tail, like she wanted to go and play. With three dogs and with her behaviour unpredictable I couldn't risk it and waited for the dogs to leave, when I was able to leave her off the lead, so she could have a run around, before I started the training outside.

I know she play while barking as she does it with my father's dog. With the bowing, she always liked being chase around the park by my father's staffie, so she isn't always the westling type.

But I try and get the distance she is comfortable and stick with this. Hopefully I get my friend to help when I am increasing the distance when I get her listen to me that is.
 

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Good idea to not risk it. Always wait until she is calm before doing activities.

When you said "no" firmly to her and she stopped barking, that is a good start. Does she usually ignore you when you say "no," or is this new?
 

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She gets walked four times a day, an hour in the morning on a short leash, two hours at noon, and she have a longer leash walk so she can sniff at things (through the woods, beach, park and countryside). She as a two hour run in the evening when there is less risk of dogs around (and to get the training 'look at me command into practise') and then lastly an hour walk before bedtime on a short leash.... So the energy wise isn't a problem.

I have bought the Halti training today so I have more control and able to help her. When I get to see the dog coming, I use park cars, stand in front of her and then get her to 'look at me command'. This works wonders and she saw a border collie on walks and we were on the other side. She stopped and had a look at the dog, but she didn't bark at it, which I praise her like mad, and she was jumping and licking at me. [again we use the park car method and slowly when she is relax bring her out to see the dog so have a look and we then carry on walking the other way]

[hr]
Would this be her thershold using this during her walks (it can be hard in the woods and parks though). I always use the other side of the pavement when I spot another dog so she wouldn't feel lot threaten, it is slowly working though. Tonight I tried to used the 'look at me' command and she spotted a Boxer [which she didn't see until it was right oppisate us]. It was on the other side of us and she was 'barking' at it until it disappeared. When we were in the park and there were three dogs, and she barked a little. When I said 'no' firmly she stopped and was 'whinning' and wagging her tail, like she wanted to go and play. With three dogs and with her behaviour unpredictable I couldn't risk it and waited for the dogs to leave, when I was able to leave her off the lead, so she could have a run around, before I started the training outside.

I know she play while barking as she does it with my father's dog. With the bowing, she always liked being chase around the park by my father's staffie, so she isn't always the westling type.

But I try and get the distance she is comfortable and stick with this. Hopefully I get my friend to help when I am increasing the distance when I get her listen to me that is.


That's basically the right idea, but the firm "no" is counterproductive to what you want to do. It may seem to work sometimes, because it startles the dog, but it doesn't actually teach the dog what to do instead. Also, if you go down the path of using "no", and it starts to not work as well, you start having to say it even more firm, until you're essentially yelling it or having to resort to physical corrections. To up the ante, you can set up and situation with friends & dogs and take all the time in the world you need to train. Also, think of it as the "look at me behavior" instead of the "look at me command". You're trying to teach a behavior, not a command.
 

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Sometimes she listens to the 'no' command, it depends on how the dog she doesn't know is like. If it's bosituous and all jumpy she would keep barking and just ironge me. If it's calm or old she would stop, and walk find.

I use the 'look at me' as I saw it on It's Me or the Dog and hopefully I can just use the hand signals and without using my voice. Lady is a quick learner and hopefully she would learn it outside (when there is no distraction like dogs and people)

We are making some very slow process, I went up my mother's yesterday and let her off the lead [there weren't any dogs around] and she loved the running around. She then spotted a GSD, which was calm and stood still. She then went close to it and I told her 'down' and she lied down and stayed for me to put her on the training lead. She barked a little and bowed the same time, with a little help of stick she went quiet and walked with me happily. On the way back home though it was another sorry, the chocolate lab which bitten her was lose and was walking right in front of us, so I had to take another route home [I didn't want my dog bitten and runied the hard work], she barked a couple of times, but followed me knowing the dog isn't going to get her etc.

We are getting on the right track slowly. I am still going to take her to training classes though to boast the confience with other dogs all shape and sizes.

Thanks for the tips so far and I'll keep you posted on any more improvements
 

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Update!

I have some news to tell you all on the process on my dog's training. I watched a training video on Youtube for help, and I releized it was the treats weren't nice/good enough to keep my dog focus. So today I learnt my dog the "let's Go" command and in five mintues she leant it!

This is just us on our own in a woodland area, so there were some distractions, but she responded and I am really proud of my girl. I am keeping this training up every morning and getting her to know the command, when I want her to move on from sniffing.

The next step would be using it around dogs but she isn't ready for this yet. I am thinking on still on dog training classes to help with the dog part, so I can practice in getting closer the dog, as I have no one to help me with this.

So while we finished the training we went on for our walk and a boxer came towards her, and was literally getting in her face all the time and I couldn't do anything. I couldn't go forward more or back as this dog kept following us, I was concern now as my dog was more stress and showing signs she was going to bite. I then saw the owner and he didn't even put the dog on the lead, even after what his dog was doing and how mind was really upset. So allowing the dog to go forward I was the cue 'Let's Go' and went back to the end of the woods. She followed me happily without barking, which is a huge improvement from last time.

So we are on the right track, and I thank everyone for their tips. Hopefully with a lot work and time, she would be happy to walk with other dogs in a sponser walk, or on a dog beach.
 
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