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Our recently adopted 8 mo. old Schoodle is a barker! My vet recommended the citronella spray collar. I've been shaking a can with coins in it when she barks at the TV and for the most part she's stopped barking at the tv.

The problem is when we crate her at night....or for the day. She used to go in quietly (we've only had her 2 weeks), but now she is barking for the first 1/2 hour or so. We don't let her out when she's barking...only when she's quiet. We have a radio on next to her crate.

She eventually settles down, sleeps through the night and in the a.m. is quietly wagging her tail. She goes in and out of the crate when we're home so she doesn't seem afraid of it.

Should I try the citronella collar....or do you suggest other methods. It's not an anxious bark....it's more of a "Hey! Where'd ya go?" bark.
 

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The coins/can and the TV, I feel you have the right idea there, and soon she will not pay any attention to the TV.

Barking in the crate, She telling you how bad it makes her feel and she would perfer to be close to you at night, maybe her own bed in the bed room would be most ideal. Thats how we have it set up. If she is not house broken, them work on that part, until then, move the crate into the bed room and see if she calms down.

I personally would not use any specialty collar for indoor problems.
 

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I would use a specialty collar for indoor use when there is no one home. The citronella collars are more humane than a shock collar.
 

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The problem with an aversive correction (such as rattling the can of coins) is that the dog associates the thing she is barking at with the aversive and not the behavior of barking. This is a beautiful example of that.. you have shaken the can when she barks at the TV. The aversive is associated with the TV and not the barking.. She is still barking (just at other things).

I prefer the method of reward for silence. This has the dog associate the cessation of barking with a reward.

Here is what I would do. When crating her, give her a diversion. This would be a Kong Stuffed with Liverwurst (stuff it and freeze it in the morning and put it in the freezer and give it to her in her crate when you go to bed). Other stuffings that work are Peanut butter, yogurt and cottage cheese.

In situations when you are right there, have some really good small treats. When she stops barking (most dogs have to catch their breath), throw her a treat. It takes good timing. I would have her used to a clicker and be training with that.. it will make the silence thing work really well if you do. When she is silent, you click and reward her. do it quickly. Gradually increase the time between the click and the treat to extend the silence fro 1 second to three seconds. When you get this going for you, add a cue such as the word "Quiet." Say it softly.

One of the things folks do when their dogs bark is the raise their voice (to be heard over the din) and say "quiet." As the dog continues to bark and gets louder, so do the people.. yelling QUIET!!!! Dogs hear the people yelling and it stimulates them to BARK MORE. So, when training for Quiet, you need to say the word softly, in a low voice.. stretching the word out with the object of instilling calm. At first it won't work.. but you must keep everything low key and low voiced to not reinforce the barking.

I own a breed of dog known to be very vocal (German Shepherd). It is said of this breed of dog that there are only two kinds: Those that bark and those that bark more.

Neither this dog or my last dog did a lot of barking. Rarely does Atka bark. Barking has never gotten her a thing.. so she just doesn't bother. She WILL bark on command and sometimes she will yip when she is REALLY excited.. but if I ask for quiet, she is.
 

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I adopted Basil about two months ago, and he came with Separation Anxiety. Whenever I so much as go into another room, he flips out, and starts barking/whining/screaming. If I leave him alone outside of his crate too long, he scratches up doors and poops and pees all over the place. When I leave him in his crate, he cries and barks the whole time. I've left him with people before, like my mom, and they all tell me nothing short of me coming back will snap him out of his panic attack.

The are several things, however, that I've been able to do to reduce this behavior:
1, Exercise!! This is very important, because when he's tired, he has less anxiety and is a little better alone. I still need to increase the amount we exercise, but we've been doing pretty good so far.
2, Make coming home and leaving not a big deal. Before you leave give him a special treat, like a stuffed kong toy, put him in his crate, and continue getting ready. Then, just sort of dissapear. When you come home, don't touch, talk or look at him until he's calmed down.
3, Have frequent "quiet times," which means toss a treat into his crate, play with a toy with him while he's in there, put him in his crate while you sit next to him and read a book. It's also a good idea to train him not to step out of the open crate unless you invite him, so he doesn't burst out all excited when you come home.
4, Practice leaving him in the crate for short intervals, like 5 minutes at a time, and gradually increase the length. Try standing just outside of the room to where he cannot see you, and give a "quiet" command whenever he whines or barks.
5, Google something called the Calming Collar. We've recently ordered one for Basil, and though we haven't had it long, it's reduced his anxiety quite a bit.

Im not suggesting that your dog has SA, though it's obvious that he does feel some anxiety when left alone. Also, it's a good idea to try to PREVENT SA when the dog is young to avoid a lot of problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We seem to be having good luck with the "pennies in a can" approach for her. She has all but stopped barking at the tv. It seems to distract her from the barking and then when she is quiet we praise her with "good quiet".

So now she's down to just a little barking in the crate at night. Glad we didn't go with a collar.

Our Stella's such a good girl!!!!
 
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