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My 11 month boston terrier LuLu is a very good girl.... however on the leash is a different story. She constantly pulls, does not even look up when I say her name, and if we see a person, car or dog - forget it. She barks her head off pulling me in their direction. She generally stops when theyre out of sight.
If we're on a crowded trail or walk where there's a lot of people, she isn't this way. She is generally good except pulling.

If I see the approaching person/dog far enough away I can say "leave it" and she won't bark but still pulls. But I can't always predict who's out and about... I've tried stopping and making her sit but she barely pays attention to me. I've carried bags of treats and food with me to try and get her attention but she could care less ! Sometimes I have to pick her up and move along because she's so loud and stubborn!

She is also constantly pulling me to smell things, and she just started this habit where she sits down if she really doesn't want me to yank her away!

It's made walking increasingly stressful but I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong ! If she's not pulling me, I'm pulling her to keep walking, and I feel terrible! It's also getting stressful walking her in the early and late ours around our condo complex.... she is so loud !!!

Not sure what the next step is, but any advice is greatly appreciated!
 

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My favorite method is "Be a tree." Basically, when your pup starts to pull, all movement stops. Wait for her to stop pulling, then move forward. I have waited for upwards of 3-5 minutes before. She will probably dart to the end of the leash. Stop again and wait for tension to release. I also reward my dog for coming back to check in with me. I don't really care what he does on the leash (unless I ask him to heel) as long as he doesn't pull, so he wanders all over the sidewalk and off to the side and out in front and sometimes behind. But, he is mannered and does not pull.

If you want your dog to walk beside you, all movement stops unless she is in the correct position. Reward her for being in the correct position ever few steps, decreasing frequency gradually as she gets better at it.

Loose leash walking is HARD for dogs, having to keep pace with us slow humans. So be patient. Be consistent. It will take quite some time to get there.

As for the reactivity, is it excitement/frustration based or fear based? The method is basically the same for either, but sometimes it helps to understand why she's barking. First, it helps to have a pretty solid "look at me" cue, and I use a "heel" cue to keep my dog at my side. You want some really awesome treats that are only used for those situations. Think hotdogs, cheese, deli meat. You may have to start a long ways away, at first, far enough away that your dog does not react. When she sees the trigger, give the "look at me" cue and reward her when she complies. Keep her moving as you walk past/away from the trigger, praising her and rewarding her for focusing on you instead of making big deal about the trigger.

As she gets better, gradually decrease the distance from the trigger. This, too, will take a long time. There is no overnight fix. While you train, it's important to never let your pup greet people or dogs on leash when she's being reactive. Personally, I don't let my dog greet anyone while on leash on walks, but if you choose to do that, make sure she is calm and polite. Tantrums should get her nothing.
 

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Dogs can be pretty big buttheads at that age! It sounds like she's very excited and stimulated by the outdoors, and can't process input from you very well, even food.

I would back up. Start somewhere boring (a quiet outdoor area or even indoors), with her on the leash, and practice walking nicely. She doesn't have to be in a strict heel, just loose leash. Reward her like crazy for checking in with you (looking at you or coming back), and whenever she gives in to leash pressure. If you look up "silky leash" on YouTube, there's a bunch of great explanations and tutorials that go more in-depth. When you're out walking, one thing that works for us is turning around when we notice Sam getting excited and pulling, and walking the other way. Sometimes this means you look silly by walking back and forth over the same 10 ft of sidewalk for a bit, but it's very effective in teaching dogs they can't get anywhere with rude leash manners.

Try doing some interesting things with her inside, too. Play "find-it" games where she has to sniff out kibble, or feed out of puzzle toys, or train silly tricks. This will give her some mental stimulation away from the outdoors, which may help her feel less like she's going to a doggy amusement park every time she's walked.

Do you walk on a collar or harness? It probably won't affect her pulling, but with a pulling small dog (and especially for a short-nosed breed), I very much prefer harnesses. A well-fitted one will take pressure off her neck and delicate trachea so it's easier to be consistent about pulling = walk stops or reverses, because you don't have to worry she's choking herself!
 

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Spot on advice so far!

I just have a few things that worked for me with my Aussie.

1) I read an article that made mention that once you decide to teach loose leash walking, you cannot let your dog EVER pull you over to something interesting. Letting them do that reinforces the pulling again and will set you back. I always have that in my mind when I walk Atlas, and I think it helps. It seems to pop up when I'm tired, he's trying to drag me over to something to pee on it, and I remember this phrase and stop him.

2) If you have the option of tiring her out before you practice, that definitely can't hurt! I am lucky that Atlas is good off-leash and we have the space, so he can usually get a good run in at the start of our walk before I need to leash him. Once he's been able to go crazy he is more able to focus on me. (You likely don't have this luxury, so doing some training, teaching tricks, or maybe even fetch inside might be good options. Obviously this might need to be outside of regular potty breaks, if she needs to be leashed for that.)

3) I've used the 'be a tree' method with lots of treats. Once I was consistent we started making progress pretty quickly. He still is extremely distracted by other dogs, so that is a work in progress, but the more I work on everything the faster he comes back to focusing on me. But dogs are great at making us humble, so don't get discouraged if there a day (or 5) where it all falls apart again.
 

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Work indoors or away form other dogs and people, teach her how to walk properly on a leash and, teach her the "Heel" command. Once she has it, add recordings of barking dogs, just sound, not an actual dog, get her to obey and walk well with the sound, then have a friend with a dog help you, one dog and one human to meet and, keep at it until she does that right and still obeys. You have to desensitize her to all of the distractions that overstimulate her, one by one as far as is possible. None of it can happen until she firmly knows how to walk on a leash and how to Heel on command.
 
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