Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 10 month shih tzu puppy that is full of energy and loves to play. Now that the weather has gotten nicer, we have been taking him to the dog park about 2-3 times a week. Each time we will stay about 1-2 hrs depending on how crowded the dog park gets. He looooves going to the dog park and playing with the other dogs, however, sometimes his behavior and energy level is just too much for the other dogs. Some dogs will tolerate him, but some will just snap at him. We have to constantly monitor his every move to make sure that is not doing anything inappropriate. So in regards to manners on playing with other dogs, is this something that can be taught be humans? Or is he supposed to learn that from the other dogs? I've heard that the younger dogs will learn manners from other older dogs because they will attempt "correct" his behavior is he is doing something that they do not like. When he does something inappropriate, we will pull him away and give him timeouts, and tell him "NO". Are there any other corrective actions that we should take? I would say his biggest problem is not knowing when to back off, even when the other dogs are clearly giving him signals that they are not interested in playing with him lol. Is this something that would require professional training? We want to transform him into a better behaved dog that gets along with the others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,193 Posts
You could take him for a walk and a 20 minute training session on the sidewalk. Draining energy is a really good way to help a young dog behave better around other dogs.

Pent up dogs are always getting into trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Try taking him for a long walk before you bring him in and see if his behavior improves. He probably has too much energy for some of the older dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts
When he pesters other dogs and they snap at him, if he backs off, then he is learning. A 10 mos dog no longer has puppy license to pester.
If he pesters a tolerant adult and the adult doesn't snark at him successfully, then you have to intercede, at least to protect the adult. I recommend a 30-sec timeout, on leash, while you sit on the bench. Then, let him go. If he goes into full pester mode, keep increasing the timeout by 30-secs.

At the dog park, you do have to watch for intolerant dogs who will snark and then chase him down. A quick snarl and air snap (snark) should be adequate to say, "buddy, that's enough."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
When he pesters other dogs and they snap at him, if he backs off, then he is learning. A 10 mos dog no longer has puppy license to pester.
If he pesters a tolerant adult and the adult doesn't snark at him successfully, then you have to intercede, at least to protect the adult. I recommend a 30-sec timeout, on leash, while you sit on the bench. Then, let him go. If he goes into full pester mode, keep increasing the timeout by 30-secs.

At the dog park, you do have to watch for intolerant dogs who will snark and then chase him down. A quick snarl and air snap (snark) should be adequate to say, "buddy, that's enough."
THanks hanksimon! Will def try the leash time out method too :) We usually just pick him up and hold him for 30 sec, away from the other dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,719 Posts
I agree with hanksimon's advice, but would add that if you're doing a time out (either leashed or holding him), you should get him to face away from the action or whatever dog he was pestering. You can try to get him to focus on you. Otherwise he'll just fixate on it, and the goal is to distract him and redirect him to so a more productive/socially acceptable activity.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top