Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am about install a fence in my backyard for my Jack Russell puppy. I am mindful of the height as I’ve been advised that they can jump as high as 5ft. I am also mindful of their digging.

But the question I would like to ask the experts here is, how narrow the gap should between the bars. The kind of fence I would like to get is something like this. The black one in the foreground.



Right now, she is a puppy so she will definitely fit through the bars. But wondering how narrow the gaps should be for a full grown adult female JRT.

If any doubts, I could go with plastic fence, (the white one behind the black one) which have narrower gap but would like to get the black one if I can get an idea that she won’t be able to fit once fully grown.

Any idea on the appropriate girth of a fully grown JRT?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,488 Posts
They can wiggle through spaces a lot smaller than you'd think.... If you go with the black one, you can add some wire mesh fencing to it to keep her from getting through the bars. Which ever one you choose, I recommend burying some wire mesh fencing (even chicken wire would work) on the inside to keep her from digging under it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
They can wiggle through spaces a lot smaller than you'd think.... If you go with the black one, you can add some wire mesh fencing to it to keep her from getting through the bars. Which ever one you choose, I recommend burying some wire mesh fencing (even chicken wire would work) on the inside to keep her from digging under it.
I see what you are saying about the wire mesh. If I had concerns about the dog wiggling through, just put some wire mesh around the lower part of fence.

But not sure what you mean about mesh on the inside? Are you suggesting to bury the mesh underground so she can’t dig past the perimeter?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,635 Posts
Before we got Franklin, a 20-pound mix of just about every known breed, I put up a new picket fence from 8-foot sections. I did it over two seasons. The spacing between the pickets on the first run was 2-1/4" and the spacing in the second run is 2-3/4", though it looks identical until you measure it.

Turns out, as a youngster, he could get through the 2-3/4" spaces but not the 2-1/4" spaces. I ended up putting chicken wire over the whole thing.

I can probably remove the chicken wire now that he's bigger.

I have two points: 1) Your dog can probably squeeze through a much smaller space than you would ever imagine. 2) If you have a growing dog and the spacing on the fence you like is very slightly too wide, you can cover it with chicken wire (which is pretty cheap) and remove it when the dog gets bigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,488 Posts
Yes, bury the wire mesh in the ground on the inside of the fence and attach the top of it to the bottom of the fencing. You can either dig a foot or so deep trench and put the mesh straight down or dig out a wider, but shallower (four inches or so) area, and lay the mesh down with it curving up to meet the fence, then put sod or mulch over the section laying on the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,100 Posts
Our Jack Russell can get out of a space as small as where the chain link curves at the bottom corner of the gate, even though we have it set as low as we can and still swing the gate. We have 5' fences around the whole property and she has never gone over one, but I know a lot of Jack Russells that are major houdinis. They often end up in shelters because their owners are unable to contain them. Since you have mentioned in other posts that your dog likes to dig, it might not hurt to have some chicken wire buried under the surface to prevent digging, but I think that depends if your dog is going to be unsupervised in the yard. Also, the digging might be a puppy habit that the dog will grow out of. But better safe than sorry.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top