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I'm not one for an upkeep in training... it takes my girls a while to sit, and that's as far as it goes with Susie. Callie at least knows how to sit, down, stand, give me five, then give me high five, but it usually takes a LOT of bribing.
Anywho, I was feeding them, and gave the command thing a shot (with Callie). It was amazing: she did everything I asked, and I only had to say it once! So, tomorrow we're going to go to the park to work on her stay and come (sometimes she just decided that she's not ready to leave yet, then we have to play chase, so "come" definately needs some work.) Then we're going running. (Lately I've been inspired to get into shape... :rolleyes:)

I know that this jumps around a bit (maybe that's why I'm failing english class o_O), but does anyone have an easy method for teaching stay and come, one that won't get my little girl fat on treats?
 

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haha...your dogs sound a little like mine...Today, I had Eddie out in the yard and we were going through all of his basic commands. I told him to roll over and gave the signal for it. He just looked at me for a second, got up and walked back toward the house...I guess he was done...haha

Anyway, as for teaching commands. For stay, I just had them sit, used my hand signal (hand up with palm toward their face)...after a second or 2 click and treat and gradually worked up to longer periods of time and at farther distances. If they break it, I just immediately put them back in a sit and repeat. Both of mine learned stay like this with no problems.

For come...ah...that was more difficult for us. I started it in the house with my boyfriend on one side of the room and me on the other, both of us had treats and we just called the dog back and forth between us and had a "party" when they came to us. Then we moved it outside. The thing that worked for us hugely was watching our body positions. For example, if I just stand out in the yard and Uallis is sniffing an "interesting" tree and I just say, "Uallis, come!" he might not...HOWEVER, if I go outside and say "Uallis, come!" while I walking in the direction I want him to go in, i.e. toward the house, then he'll come. Also, something to keep in mind that helped was always making it a point to be more interesting than anything my dog was doing. For example, Uallis is still sniffing that "interesting" tree...and he didn't respond to my command, well then I just might do something else...like take off running suddenly, stand on the picnic table, lay on the ground anything that makes him WANT to come to me and when he does...have a party. I guess that is the biggest tip I can give...always make yourself more interesting than anything that your dog is doing when you need him or her to come to you.

I'm sure someone else will be able to give you better tips than me...but this is what has worked for us.

Good luck! :)
 

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"Stay" and "come" are relatively easy commands for dogs to learn in that it's not difficult to show the dog what you want from her. You can even use nothing but body language to communicate this -- body blocks for stay, and general excitement/turning around and running off for come.

How good is she at "stay" and "come" already? To be honest I don't know if I would progress straight to the park for these commands unless she's already mastered them at home. Parks are extremely distracting environments, and you want to set your dog up for success, not failure.
 

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haha...your dogs sound a little like mine...Today, I had Eddie out in the yard and we were going through all of his basic commands. I told him to roll over and gave the signal for it. He just looked at me for a second, got up and walked back toward the house...I guess he was done...haha

Anyway, as for teaching commands. For stay, I just had them sit, used my hand signal (hand up with palm toward their face)...after a second or 2 click and treat and gradually worked up to longer periods of time and at farther distances. If they break it, I just immediately put them back in a sit and repeat. Both of mine learned stay like this with no problems.

For come...ah...that was more difficult for us. I started it in the house with my boyfriend on one side of the room and me on the other, both of us had treats and we just called the dog back and forth between us and had a "party" when they came to us. Then we moved it outside. The thing that worked for us hugely was watching our body positions. For example, if I just stand out in the yard and Uallis is sniffing an "interesting" tree and I just say, "Uallis, come!" he might not...HOWEVER, if I go outside and say "Uallis, come!" while I walking in the direction I want him to go in, i.e. toward the house, then he'll come. Also, something to keep in mind that helped was always making it a point to be more interesting than anything my dog was doing. For example, Uallis is still sniffing that "interesting" tree...and he didn't respond to my command, well then I just might do something else...like take off running suddenly, stand on the picnic table, lay on the ground anything that makes him WANT to come to me and when he does...have a party. I guess that is the biggest tip I can give...always make yourself more interesting than anything that your dog is doing when you need him or her to come to you.

I'm sure someone else will be able to give you better tips than me...but this is what has worked for us.

Good luck! :)
As of now, the only way that she'll follow me is if I take off running. I've hidden from her before when she didnt' come once... she freaked out, running all over the place. She's more watchful now.



"Stay" and "come" are relatively easy commands for dogs to learn in that it's not difficult to show the dog what you want from her. You can even use nothing but body language to communicate this -- body blocks for stay, and general excitement/turning around and running off for come.

How good is she at "stay" and "come" already? To be honest I don't know if I would progress straight to the park for these commands unless she's already mastered them at home. Parks are extremely distracting environments, and you want to set your dog up for success, not failure.
She's not very good... thus the work. ;)
Our park isn't a busy park: no more than 2-3 families (not including campers) are there at any given time, and there's plenty of yard to work on. Plus there isn't the distraction of other dogs there.:rolleyes:
 
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