Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
There is this one house that I would walk by and this Golden Retriever would sometimes come out of no where and start barking (hidden fence). Well I got a Lab mix last week and I was walking the dog. We walked past that one house and the dog again came out of no where barking, but this time ran past his invis fence and started to attack my dog. It all happen so fast and a split second later it was over as the owner rushed out of her house and the dog disengaged. My dog seemed very confused and the woman was apologizing saying she just switched out the battery. I have never seen a Golden act like this, for some reason if you see the dog it doesn't attack, though if you are not paying attention, then he can make you jump. Again this is the first them he has ever crossed his fence.

Has this dog not been properly socialized, is he/she being very territorial? Is it wrong to possibly inflict harm on an attacking dog to defend your own dog? What is the best way to stop a dog attack? He didn't attack me, went strait for my dog who is not full grown yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,343 Posts
the first step is prevention- hopefully the owner will be more on alert, but I'd start with walking on the other sidewalk or opposite side of the road. Sometimes that is enough to make a territorial dog more comfortable.

Ask the owner if the dog has a "stop" word. Chester and I had a run in with a dog-aggressive dog once and a passerby helped us by getting the owner. The dog had jumped the fence. The owner apologized massively and told me the dog knew "Go home" and yep, "go home" did work.

Most of the dogs that will attack other dogs are not human aggressive- putting your dog behind your back (step in front) and telling the other dog sternly to "Back" or "Stop" or "NO!" or all of them, will often stop the dog from continuing towards your dog.

In most areas, if you are on public property and a loose dog is a threat, you are within your rights to stop it with physical means if needed. Read your local laws if you are concerned about another owner making a problem. My opinion is that if a dog is off their property and attacking my dog(s) or me, then I have the right to stop it. I would try however to prevent serious harm to the other dog. Every situation is different and the actions that will stop a dog and what's available to you is different.

Chester's been attacked by a Golden before, it isn't unheard of or anything.

Oh, and invisible fences don't do much at all for truly aggressive dogs. They get so hyped up they run right through them. (same with many high-prey drive dogs who chase rabbits etc right past the fence and then get scared to come back home because it hurt to leave...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,406 Posts
I have never seen a Golden act like this
Goldens aren't all buttercups and sunshine like the media and film industry would have you think. They're dogs too. My chihuahua was attacked by a golden some years ago, luckily my own golden was there to help.

Has this dog not been properly socialized, is he/she being very territorial?
More likely that the dog is territorial, which can be a result of poor socialization and isolation to one area -this isn't always the case though. Sometimes dogs are just territorial -in tact males are more likely to be defensive as well. That could be a factor.

Is it wrong to possibly inflict harm on an attacking dog to defend your own dog? What is the best way to stop a dog attack?
I have to say, if you have no other choice, do it. Protect yourself, protect your dog. Of course if you can't run the dog off, or scare it, or stop it any other way, then I do believe it's moral and lawful to protect yourself and your leashed pet.
Like Shell said, moving to the other side of the street -basically getting as far away from the dog as possible- can be helpful, as well as putting your body between your dog and the offender. I often have to do that and some times it's enough to diffuse the tension. Just be calm and put as much space between you and the offending animal as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts
The dog is not socialized. Local laws vary, but I don't know if an invisible fence is considered adequate according to the law... and you can raise those question, since it was proven inadequate. You have every right to protect yourself when you are not on their property. I'm not sure that yelling at someone else's dog will get the response desired... it may excite the other dog. A comparatively safe distractor is an airhorn - the little hand held devices that you hear at ball games. Your dog may not like it, but if you point it at an attacking dog and blast him for a moment, he will think twice before approaching more closely. And, it will get the attention of the owner and witnesses...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, I spoke to my fiance about this and we decided to take another route. The thing that was nice about that route, is that it has a sidewalk, which we were on. I wish they would do something about that dog as it has made me jump a few times before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,727 Posts
At my last Agility trial Remmy was sitting on the ground beside me and a Fox Terrier came racing out of the ring and attacked him. As I was sitting and did not have time to get up I used my foot to fend him off. Remmy did not try to fight back, just tried to escape but was pinned against my legs. I felt badly about kicking the dog, although it was more of a push with my foot as I was sitting. It happened so fast and was so unexpected at a trial. It managed to grab Remmy a couple of times on his back but luckily he has enough hair that all he ended up with was some red marks as it did not break the skin.

After that the owner was very careful to pick up her dog before she left the ring and not just let him run out.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top