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Discussion Starter #1
Pretty sure that healthy gums are solid pink. Could this be some type of bacterial invasion?

The dog in question is a five year old Blue Heeler named Missy. She is extremely healthy and polite, I call her Missy Manners.

A challenge lies in the fact that my group of furry buddies do a lot of hiking in the most remote country that we can find. Far too rough to be able to navigate with leashes.

Most of us know that dogs naturally eat almost anything they find. That includes the occasional wild rabbit of course. Then you have stuff left over by previous predators. There are a great deal of black bears and cougars. So much so that there are very few deer and elk left in the dense forests. They seemingly have to be more in open areas to survive predation. But that is another story.

My "expertise" is fish health. I've done custom aquariums for 24 years. So I have plenty of fish medicine though I find that a healthy environment precludes the need for fish medicine.

My dogs environment is very healthy. All three dogs are, otherwise, extra-ordinarily healthy.

The dark redness is adjacent to the rear "molars"...or teeth. Perhaps try some amoxycillin? I have plenty of that.
 

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I would not just randomly give my dog an antibiotic unless I had seen a Vet and found out if they even needed it or whether it was what they needed if it was a problem.
 

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Please go see a vet. It could be gingivitis, it could be irritation due to tooth damage below the gumline.

i really don't recommend self-treating with antibiotics if you don't know what the problem is or what the causative agent might be.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I would not just randomly give my dog an antibiotic unless I had seen a Vet and found out if they even needed it or whether it was what they needed if it was a problem.
One could see that coming from ten miles away. My vet retired and I am so remote that I hardly ever go to the local small town.

You think vets always know exactly what to do? I've known a few doctors and dentists who confided what the word "practice" really means.

I couldn't hardly be more careful than asking about a popular broad spectrum anti-biotic such as amoxycillin. This isn't exactly open heart surgery that inquired about.

Thanks for the suggestion.

I think I see what will happen. This account will likely disappear quite soon under the crush of snowflakes.
 

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If you don't think a vet would know what to do, what makes you think that random internet strangers, most of whom have no formal medical training, will know what to do?

ETA: Overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics is exactly the point, by the way, and has given us delightful things like MRSA - which dogs can get, btw.
 
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