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My dog doesn't know "no" or "leave it". I just use his name when I want to redirect him from something. He understands "hey" as me being a little more terse or upset, but he learned that through me being grumpy, not a NRM that I deliberately taught or conditioned.

I think people need to separate actual training versus being human. Even if my "hey" was a "no", it's not a cue that teaches him anything valuable. Example, "hey!" get out of the grocery bags. He goes away. But he still sniffs the grocery bags next time I walk in the house. Not a problem. But if I REALLY wanted to work on this, I would say "go to bed" the moment I walked in and reinforce that. I will say "hey!" if I'm feeling impatient and he's sniffing too long (he does get plenty of sniff opportunities generally), which stops him. But he is still a sniff+marking machine the next day and the day after. So I am not actively changing behavior there either.

I think people may be looking for something acceptable? Like somehow the idea of 'no' has become bad but 'leave it' sounds more functional so it means someone is doing a better job? I don't think any of that matters, as it's all semantics that have very little bearing on actual training and results.
 

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I'm always happy to elaborate! There is a lot of redundancy in training. A verbal cue sometimes helps the human contextualize the situation more so than the dog. For example, a lot of these cues lead to the same behavior of turning towards the owner:
-no
-leave it
-(dog's name)
-come
-(whistling, clapping, etc)

This is not the case for every dog, but it is common for many. So with my first dog I taught no, leave it, and his name. In MY mind, I used "no" for when he was doing something incorrect. "leave it" for when he was approaching something off limits. "Soro" for when I wanted his attention. I hope you can see the redundancy in the very definitions. However, because of how I trained historically, "no" and "leave it" were not fun behaviors for him because they were only used in negative situations and I used punishment at the time to condition those cues. But he loved his name because his name often led to treats, pets, walks, toys, etc. So if all three words led to the same behavior of turning to me (thereby not performing the unwanted behavior), why wouldn't I just use his name instead of the other two words?

I used that principle from day 1 with my second dog Brae. Instead of teaching three of the same cues, he is just really responsive to his name and it works across many situations.

"Stay" and "wait" are similar. Some will say in one instance you leave the dog for a duration and then return to the dog, in the other instance you release the dog after a short instance to go out or give him food. Soro was taught both words with that in mind. Brae only knows "wait". The idea of short versus long, return to the dog versus calling them to you or releasing them... doesn't address the fact that the BEHAVIOR you're looking for is still the same - a dog keeping their position until given another cue.

Now, I do think there can be value in teaching a dog different contexts and to anticipate what's to come (ex. "stay" means anticipate longer duration, "wait" means anticipate shorter), but that's a separate discussion and I don't think it is as important in training as efficiently targeting the behavior you want.
 

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Here's a video example. This was taken in a popular off leash area and at the very beginning of the walk. Brae is very interested in other dogs:
Here's another example of how verbal cues are not the be-all-end all. In this video, the two most important cues are non-verbal. When I stand at the car door, that is his cue to lie down, even if I open the door. I used his name to let him out. Then, my standing by the car is a cue for him to sit and look at me (I do not say "sit", "look at me" or "wait"). He needs to do this before he gets his release cue "free" to start the hike, even if I am rummaging in the car for equipment or taking my time. It was a lot more efficient for me to teach these visual, contextual cues (ex. this is what we do every time we get out of the car) versus relying on verbal cues like "wait". Not that there'd be anything wrong with using verbal cues.
 

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That's a lot of steps 3GSD. Personally I would not feel safe applying leash corrections while biking with my dog. Though I am a pretty uncoordinated biker, admittedly! As always, I'd love to see a video of your training techniques. I'm sure you're as exact and calculating as you say you are.
I bike fairly regularly with my dog, on and off leash. I taught him a word that means "be on my right side" but not as close as heelwork. We use that for tight areas and passing distractions. Otherwise, training to not go after dogs, stay on one side while moving, ignore wildlife... Is the same as what I do when I'm walking with him.

As always, I'm happy to provide photos and videos of my dog performing these skills with me. We did an 16 mile ride last summer without any hitches and I have some footage of him doing a nice job off leash. I can take a camera and film an on-leash bike ride past distractions whenever too.
 

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That is great! Good for you! would love to see a video biking with distractions on a hand held leash.

This is for the Ausdauerprüfung (here is a link: http://siriusdog.com/ausdauerprufung-ad/). Dog MUST be on leash. There is NO off leash work in the AD. I think 8 dogs are going for their AD. The trail we use is a public bike path that runs along an old rail bed. It is paved. This is the first dog I have trained doing this and we are not "seasoned" as human distractions are few. Honestly I think I could get badly hurt doing this at my age and with some physical limitations (but I don't quit). He would probably be pretty good off leash (tho he would wear an e collar due to road crossings and wild life issues). BUT he cannot BE off leash for the test. Period. No point in training what I am not going to use a month before the test.

I have no issue WALKING with my dog. A bike brings in the issue of stability (feet on ground is a pretty stable base).

I don't do videos simply because I cannot train AND video. I tried during tracking.. sorry.. I need to train OR video and not do both. On a bike? yeah.. that is how I will die.. haha.
I'll try to get a video today; gorgeous day for a bike ride. Funny, one prominent walking path near my house is also along an old rail bed. It is paved and there are also busy street crossings and occasionally wildlife. I just use a verbal cue to stop him when those situations arise. I trained all these cues using R+ only. I'm NOT saying you need to do that, just noting it so that the lurking reader can see that it's possible. I'll try to get some shots of us biking past human and dog distractions. This may be irrelevant, but years ago I took a very bad fall on a bike and it was totally my fault. There was no dog involved in that situation, and actually it was before I owned any dogs. I was unconscious for a few seconds despite the fact that I wore a helmet. I still have a scar on my chin from the injury and subsequent stitches. So I will be the first to say that I am not a good biker. And I guess the relevant part to this is I need to be a good trainer to make up for it - my dog is not what I should worry about when I am on a bike.

A lot of my videos are taken with a tripod. A rare few are taken by having my partner or friends hold the camera. My reason for documenting training, and my reason for asking for videos, is I believe in action over words. Who would believe that I got a working line Dutchie and trained him to do all these real world things without using traditional aversive tools/methods? Same for you... Whereas I have less doubt in your IPO abilities, I'd love to see proof of your expertise about fear, reactivity, and normal pet-dog problems that people have.
 

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Alright, just got back from a nice and quite uneventful bike ride. I was able to capture a few clips.

Here's one on the path I mentioned in an earlier post. There didn't happen to be any walkers while I was there so the only distraction was the adjacent dog park. This video cut short due to some 'limit' being reached. Not sure, hard to read, film, and bike...

I immediately hit record again as we were passing the dog park. I wanted to capture my dog being calm IF the dogs in there started running the fence, which has happened before. The dogs ran after we passed them but there's no way I could have pivoted the camera safely, and it was really uneventful.

I stopped filming because the road takes a very sharp turn along a busy intersection. After that turn I started filming again as I headed down the road. We passed a random guy, then I had to stop again because there was some construction to get past.


Cues used: "whoa" to stop at an intersection. "let's go" to start, and was probably unnecessary otherwise but I use it as (encouragement?) sometimes, or a reminder not to stop and sniff if we are brushing right up against a distraction like a bush my dog might want to pee on.

He did automatic disengages (very evident in second video especially) as he noticed the dogs in the park.
 
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