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They're not the easiest but they're not the most difficult either. As a trainer, the mini dachshunds I usually see with problem behaviors (or complaints) are

1. Housebreaking. These guys are TOUGH to housebreak- on par with a lot of the toy breeds. Consistancy and REALLY cleaning up carefully when you DO have accidents seems to e the key. Not all of them are this way, and for a lot i tseems that it takes forever and then one day, poof, the dog gets it. Some though, take a VERY long time to become consistant and I know of two that never really did - they were fine as long as carefully managed but would not really indicate or hold it outside of the routine they knew.

2. Resource guarding - I think this may be a similar problem as I see with corgis, where the puppy is tiny and adorable and a cute little high-pitched growl (so no one takes it seriously the first time the puppy tries resource guarding) with full-size teeth. Totally preventable with trade games and good handling.

3. Recall and focus issues. These guys are in the hound group, but they could just as easily have gone in the terrier group. They're independent and nose-oriented and INCREDIBLY stubborn about it. Being creative with your reinforcers and always setting the puppy up to succeed (where he has NO choice but to respond and if he doesn't, there's no chance of self-rewarding in the environment) for a very extended period of time seems to be a factor here.

And it's not a training issue, but I'd also mention health problems. Mini dachshunds are THE breed where poorly bred dogs can have REALLY bad structure, making them MUCH more prone to injury and stuff like IVDD. If I had a client or friend looking for a mini dachshund, I would steer them towards the working teckel clubs. There are minis (mostly wires) being imported from Germany for rabbit hunting and they're sounder, less extreme dogs than the show dogs and bred with much more care than the BYB dogs.
 

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I have trained a Daschund once before and it was definatly a challenge. there is a reason you didn't see a daschund playing "Lassie" lol

they are a Runaway breed also, meaning they are likly to take off and disapear after a smell. They are not eager to please, and they have more of a "I'll do it when I want to" attitude. But they are a very loving breed that seems to love everyone they meet. They can be noisy as well.

and like Dog Star said. make sure you do lots of research on the breeder (if you go to a breeder) because this breed is prone to bad back problems. Try and find a breeder whos dogs have a history of no back problems. Ask for vet records of the parents of the puppy, to make sure the breeder isn't lying about the health of her lines.
 

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They're not the easiest but they're not the most difficult either. As a trainer, the mini dachshunds I usually see with problem behaviors (or complaints) are

1. Housebreaking. These guys are TOUGH to housebreak- on par with a lot of the toy breeds. Consistancy and REALLY cleaning up carefully when you DO have accidents seems to e the key. Not all of them are this way, and for a lot i tseems that it takes forever and then one day, poof, the dog gets it. Some though, take a VERY long time to become consistant and I know of two that never really did - they were fine as long as carefully managed but would not really indicate or hold it outside of the routine they knew.
Tell me about it. Jonas is almost 4, we've had him about a year, and we've finally got potty training down. He is the epitome of the stubborn doxie stereotype. If I didn't take him outside right away in the morning, literally the first thing I did, he would go the minute his feet hit the floor.

And with the back problems, the less wienery your wiener dog is, the better off. Some of them have been bred loooooong, and those are more likely to slip discs and have problems. Unfortunately, Jonas is quite wienery. We're helping to avoid this by joint supplements, a good diet, and not allowing him to jump from any thing. He has doggie stairs, and we rebuilt our deck so there were longer stairs and the climb was very gradual.
 

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I see them now and then as training clients.

Dogstar pretty much hit it dead on.

Housetraining seems to be a challenge for them. Although a close friend of mine that is dog Savvy bought one a couple years back for his fiance now wife. He had no issues and the little guy got it pretty quick.

Resource guarding and other behaviorial issues can be problems. My theory here is about the same ad Dogstar's. People tend to treat very small dogs as puppies and toys.... Or think because they are small they don't need training. The little guys get placed up on a pedistal and end up being tiny terrors.


And being hounds they are ruled by their noses.
 

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*cough* yes yes yes...

Dogstar hit it head on. But I think a diligent trainer won't have too many problems.

I've been around doxies my whole life, and you couldn't pay me to own one. That's just me.
 

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I have a female mini-dachshund, of all the dogs I've had she Is by far the most difficult to potty train. If I don't jump and fly out the door first thing she will pee on the floor. I've always found in general males make a better pet when neutered early(6mnths). She has her own agenda and not interested in pleasing. constantly on the kitchen table or sniffing for morsels. They are not good with young children either. I have followed advice on here by RedyreRottweilers and that worked well I think it is a must read too:) House Training:)
 

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No way!!! I have five dogs, four of them are mini daschunds... They are all very trained... And three of them where shelter dogs!

Pickle who was from a breeder was rather easy to train. As where the others.

I highy suggest daschunds, Expecially minis.:)
 

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I have 2 mini doxies. My little girl was rediculous to potty train (1+years). But, like someone mentioned, it just snapped one day. the day before it was 3-4 accidents in the house, the next day, everything outside, and no accidents unless she was sick. She also lacks focus, but we're working on it. Now that she's about to turn 2, she's settled quite a bit, so I'm able to work with her more. Before it was terrible just walking her to tire her out. She can go longer than my heeler mix! She doesn't run away, but she definitely wants to do what she wants to do.

My Max, on the other hand, is the perfect little dog. We got him at around age 4, from a bad situation. He potty trained in 3 days, and now he'll pee every once in a while when he's scared, but the frequency has reduced from several times a day, to 1-2 times in a month. I don't blame him for that. I'd be scared of ppl if I were beaten like he was. He's very obedient, and will not stray more than about 10 feet from me, even if he's outside offleash. He even did that when he was still intact. He doesn't bark unless he's playing, and he's a very smart boy. He picks things up really quick. Unfortunately, he is more the long dog type, so we've started him on supplements, and we're hoping that he didn't do too much jumping the first 4 yrs of his life.

I don't think they're too terrible to train. You have to be verrry patient, though. They will try to push your buttons. Like if you've had an exhausting day at work, expect them to try something when you get home.
 
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