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What do you guys think?

I have a Cairn Terrier and I'm not 100% convinced. Some people tell me, it is just a claim people make. Others, they swear by the "hypoallergenic" title of their breed. :lie:

I know Cairns, Labradoodles, and some select terriers are often called hypoallergenic, but I am really interested to hear what everyone else thinks. Or, even better, hear from a vet if there is anything to back this up!

Thanks all!
 

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I'm sure there are individual dogs that some individuals don't react to, or react less to, but it is at the individual dog to individual level.
 

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I think the general consensus is that there is nothing as a true "hypoallergenic" dog because all dogs have dander and fur and other things people are allergic to. There are certain breeds and certain dogs within certain breeds that some people have less of a reaction to though.
 

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I think the labradoodle is the most interesting contender in the hypoallergenic pool - a cross between a minimal-shedding dog (and a wonderful dog just as is) and a dog that can shed twice it's own body weight, in two contrasting colors with that undercoat, every 24 hours.

I love labs, and so do the robins who line their nests each spring with lab-fur tumbleweeds from our yard, but that's not a dog I would mix to try and devise a dog for allergy sufferers.
 

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Aidan's is a hypoallergenic breed. A man who is severely allergic to just about every kind of pet animal spent several hours at our house, twice. He had no reaction to Aidan at all. I didn't know the man was severely allergic to dogs until his son told me after those two visits.

Of course, this single example proves nothing. We didn't get Aidan for his so-called hypoallergenic qualities.
 

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I think the general consensus is that there is nothing as a true "hypoallergenic" dog because all dogs have dander and fur and other things people are allergic to.
But "hypoallergenic" does not mean "non-allergenic," as in causing absolutely no reaction at all. It actually means "slightly allergenic" or "below average" allergenic. Some dogs do inspire much less of an allergic reaction in sensitive people than others, which would certainly make them hypoallergenic. There's no dog breed that is completely non-allergenic, though. :)
 

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There are hypoallergenic dogs out there. It's just that they're called that because they shed less than a double-coated dog. I'm allergic to dog dander, so if I was near a Lab, I would get all the signs: eyes watering/itching, wheezing, sniffles, etc. But with my Coton, who barely sheds and only sheds when we comb him, I'm perfectly fine with. Some dogs have fur, others have hair. I'm told hypoallergenic dogs have hair and people react less to them. Also there's the saliva part too. I love it when dogs kiss me, yet I react to it underneath my chin. My Coton can kiss me all day and I don't react one bit.

As for the "doodle dogs", you don't know what they'll turn out to be when they grow up. They could be more Poodle and shed less, or they could be more Golden and still shed. That's the risk people take. But it mostly has to do with the coat. Single coated dogs shed less and are good for people who suffer with allergies. Whereas a double coated dog, will shed more. They shed huge amounts in the summer and winter. That's mainly the difference.
 

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Kabota is not a "hypoallergenic" breed, but my brother in law, who reacted immediately and severely to my old dog has little reaction to Kabota. It's really a mix between the individual allergy sufferer and the individual dog. Added to that is grooming. If you wash and brush frequently, it probably helps keep allergic reactions to a minimum.

And hypoallergenic is not non allergenic. I've become allergic to all sorts of hypoallergenic things, including 18k gold.
 

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In Patricia McConnell's "Other End of the Leash" she talks about a couple who needed a seeing eye dog, the wife was blind, but the husband was severely allergic to dogs. The Labradoodle is usually hailed as the hypoallergenic dog (which I'm assuming it gets its hypoallergenic bit from the poodle side) The service dog company in Australia (I'm doing this from memory) sent hair samples and saliva samples from every puppy in a recent litter. The husband turned out to be allergic to them all. They sent him hair and saliva samples of a 2nd generation Labradoodle and of the entire litter he showed reactions to all those puppies except one. I believe that dog allergy people it depends on the dog too. I've had cat allergic people come into my house and not know I have cats because they show no symptoms. My father-in-law swears he's allergic to white furred animals, since I have white guinea pigs, and a mostly white calico, he refuses to come into my home.
 

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Allergic humans react to a protein in dog saliva and dander. Some dogs produce very little of this protein and thus are considered "hypoallergenic." most studies have found that it is individual dogs rather than any specific breed that are hypoallergenic
 

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IMO humans are allergic to differnt things. Iam not allergic to dogs persay. But let me touch a schnauzer or wire haired JRT or a wire haired fox terrier and i break out in hives. And im a dog groomer. No other types of dogs both mer. But any wire hair sneds me in to a scratchy sneezy frenzy, which sucks. Since I said my job is a dog groomer. and I do ALOT of schnazuer dogs. Im ALWAYS itchy from them. IMO its the type of fur, as opposed to the kind. Any other breed doesnt bother me. But any wire haired breed really sets me off. And I LOVE the look of wirey hair in dogs/mixes lol
 
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