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Hey all

i have a female husky who will turn 1 year old at the end of this month. she used to have a brother (sadly passed away 4 months ago due to parvo :'( ). the main point is she didn't get parvo, got her checked. after her brother died, her appetite decreased and went on and off, she's too picky about her food, and she eats very little in comparison with what she used to. she's 21 kgs, very active and energetic, vaccinated and de-wormed.but the thing is she's underweight; i can feel her hips and ribs. took her to the vet several times and he just says she's in perfect health. but this issue is bothering me. so what would u think that is causing this loss of appetite? PLEASE NOTE: she isn't losing weight but not gaining any either. her weight drops to 20 then goes up to 21kgs, and this problem started about 4 months ago.

any help?
 

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Feeling her hips says she's a bit underweight, yes, but you should be able to feel the dog's ribs with minimal/no pressure at all.

While she does sound a bit underweight, as a whole, it doesn't sound like she's dying. She's also young, and thus still a puppy...they can go kinda rangy. Do you free feed? Do you cater to her dietary whims?
 

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yes i do free feed her ever since she started to lose her appetite, if i'm eating, she's interested with the food, but not hers. :S changed her dry food brands several times....no change. she used to adore canned food, but lost interest in them as well :s
 

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Do you think she's going through depression missing her brother? Some dogs, I hear, go through that. That's the only thing I can think of, that maybe that's why she's not eating. I hope she's okay.
 

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she went through a depression stage for about 3 weeks then recovered. the thing is its not a life threatening thing, but it gets on my nerves :S
 

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I'd start giving her scheduled meals. Put it down for 15 minutes, if she doesn't eat, too bad, so sad. She can eat, or be hungry until her next meal.
 

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Speaking of Satin Balls, most people don't know what those are.

Here was an article I saved a year ago when I first got skinny Gweeb and never knew what the heck people were talking about. I went to the store looking for "satin balls". He ended up not needing them since he's a good eater and food obsessed but I had prepared some for his coming home as the previous owners claimed he didn't eat.

I got this off another dog forum. If your dog doesn't do well with beef, ground lamb works well, turkey can probably work too.

How to: Make Satin Balls or Fat Balls
Here is a recipe for Satin Balls, that takes the best recipes from the internet and combines them with information shared in the Food and Nutrition Forum, along with a discussion of the ingredients.

Satin Balls appear to have developed in the show community, as an uncooked, homemade dog food to improve coats and put weight on a skinny dog, quickly. Many recipe variations have proliferated on the internet, but a few are mentioned frequently. The dog rescue community also uses Satin Balls to put weight on underweight dogs. The following recipe combines the best elements of two of the most common recipes circulating on the internet.

Satin Balls:
10 pounds raw ground beef, 70%-85% lean
18 ounces Total Multi-grain cereal (or other vitamin-fortified, unsweetened cereal
2 pounds oatmeal, uncooked regular or quick oats (not instant oats)
20 ounces wheat germ
1 ¼ cup canola oil
1 ¼ cup unsulfured molasses
10 hard-boiled eggs and shells, crushed and minced
10 envelopes unflavored gelatin
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon minced garlic

Combine all ingredients and mix well. Divide into freezer bags in daily ration portions (some divide into 10 equal portions, others 14, and I divide it into one-pound packs). Flatten out the filled bags to expel air and completely fill the bags, and to reduce freezing/thawing times. Seal and place the bags in the freezer in a single layer. Once frozen, the bags can be stacked. For travel, the frozen bags can be placed in a cooler and used to chill other items until needed. Break thawed meat mixture into chunks or roll into meatballs. Feed raw as a meal or supplement.

Yield: approx. 17 pounds @ 1275 calories/pound.


About the Ingredients

Beef: If the goal is to improve the coat, then use leaner ground beef. If the goal is to put weight on, quickly, then use ground beef with higher fat content.

Cereal: The original recipe calls for Total cereal, but another fortified, unsweetened cereal could be used. Some competing recipes discourage the use of Total cereal “due to its high sugar content”, but since it is unsweetened, the sugar content is low. Total was chosen for the original recipe because of its vitamin content.

Molasses: Some recipes criticize the use of sugar (molasses) in the recipe, however the molasses contributes minerals and calories. If the Satin Balls were being fed on a regular basis, long-term, then one might want to omit the molasses.

Eggs: The original recipe for Satin Balls calls for 10 raw eggs. Apart from concerns about salmonella, raw egg white contains avitin which blocks the use of the B vitamin, biotin. While there is a lot of biotin in the egg yolk, to offset the avitin in the egg white, dogs do not digest raw eggs as well as they do cooked. Cooking neutralizes the avitin, allowing full use of the biotin. Cooked eggs are more nutritious and easier to digest, with more usable calories per egg, so our recipe calls for hard-boiled eggs. The shells are included for their calcium.

Gelatin: Some recipes call for unflavored joint health supplement gelatin.


Other Recipes
Some of the competing recipes, variously called Satin Balls or Fat Balls, call for subsets of the main Satin Ball recipe, and often add cream cheese or peanut butter. The high dairy content of some of these recipes may cause digestive upset in some dogs. Here are some of the other, popular recipes for Satin/Fat Balls.

Fat Balls #1:
10 pounds ground beef
10 ounces uncooked oatmeal
6 raw egg yolks
10 ounces wheat germ
10 ounces molasses

Combine all ingredients and mix well. Roll into one-inch balls and freeze.


Fat Balls #2:
1 pound ground beef (high fat content)
1 package cream cheese
1 jar all-natural peanut butter
12 raw egg yolks
1 cup rolled oats soaked in milk
1 jar wheat germ

Combine all ingredients and mix well. Freeze into meal-sized bags and thaw as needed.


Fat Balls #3:
1 half-pint container heavy cream
12 raw egg yolks
2 blocks cream cheese (at room temp)
5 pounds ground beef
1 small box Total cereal (crushed into crumbs)
1 cup wheat germ

Mix dry ingredients, add heavy cream, add cream cheese, mix together. Add ground beef, and mix together. Roll into balls and freeze.


Fat Balls #4:
2 cups dry dog food, crushed fine
2 packs cream cheese
1 ½ cups peanut butter
½ cup corn oil
1 cup cottage cheese
1 pound ground beef, browned (reserve some of the fat)
additional crushed dry dog food, as needed

“Combine all ingredients and mix well. Work to a doughy mixture, adding more crushed dry dog food meal as needed, if consistency is too thin. On wax paper spread some crushed dry dog food meal and roll out mixture into log shape. Refrigerate until firm and slice as needed. Feed them a slice or two several times during the day.”
 

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Good advice above especially scheduled meals, sometimes mixing some canned food with water soaked dry food also can help, add the dry food needed and then let it soak water so it softens and then mix couple table spoons of the canned food and it works with some dogs.

Satin balls thing is kinda wild the wife and I don't eat that good.
 

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My dog stopped eating once. He was never a big eater, but he wanted nothing to do with food for a while. He got so thin he started being lethargic and I had to rush him to the vet. I'd say get the dog to a vet for tests, to make sure there's nothing physical (there was with mine).

To make Dexter gain some weight (he was down to 48 lbs. It was not pretty), I'd sit down and hand feed him as much as I could, as many times a day as I could. I tried schedule meals, but he'd go for up to 4 days without eating ANYTHING.

He'll never be a huge fan of food. I get nervous every summer when I drive down the vet and weight him. He's still a bit thin (he got sick and dangerously thin 2 years ago) with his weight around 60 pounds (it's really just a lot of fur...people usually estimate his weight at around 80 when they look at him), but I found mixture he's willing to eat and kibbles he'll gulp down. And he's definitely not lethargic.
 

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I love those fat ball recipes!

I have a dog who is horrible about eating. If your dog is not allergic to chicken or beef........this is what I do. I cook in a little bit of water some chicken liver or chicken gizzards or beef liver until it is just done. I freeze all of it. I take out a little bit of my preferred meat and add just enough to the dry kibble and mix it up and make it all smell like the meat. I trick him. He eats. The chicken liver and gizzards and beef liver cost $3.00 a week. It can last longer depending on how much you add to the kibble. Be careful of too much meat added.....it could give them the runs. :)

My little one is pleasingly plump now. :)
 

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thank you for your advice but every time i introduce something new to her meal, she eats it all up, but the next day she won't taste it at all. she won't eat the same food 2 days in a row. she's so picky and i'm going crazy :s
 

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thank you for your advice but every time i introduce something new to her meal, she eats it all up, but the next day she won't taste it at all. she won't eat the same food 2 days in a row. she's so picky and i'm going crazy :s
This sounds to me as if you have, unwillingly, trained her to be a fussy eater. I would suggest to try this method http://www.sue-eh.ca/page24/page39/ for a while and to stick with it. Hope that helps ;-)
 

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thank you for your advice but every time i introduce something new to her meal, she eats it all up, but the next day she won't taste it at all. she won't eat the same food 2 days in a row. she's so picky and i'm going crazy :s
Yep. I really do know the feeling. I just found a brand he doesn't do that with. After 3 years. Good luck!
 

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I dredged this thread up to use for Lucy ... her hip bones are sticking out ... and her ribs ... I cannot stand it.

I have a question or two about using satin balls. Should these be fed in between dog food as they are raw. I hear so much about raw not digesting properly when fed along side of kibble? How do I add these in to every day kibble feedings?
 
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