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Maddie has multiple allergies, and one is grass (great, right?). She's consequently itchy, mainly her paws. Right now, I'm giving her 1/2 a Benadryl 2x daily, but it doesn't help much.

The director of the rescue I got her from is also a vet tech, and she told me yesterday that when she has an itchy dog, she gives them a shot that helps for about a month. I think she called it a lepo, or lepa shot, as it's nickname (not lepto - that's for something else). Is anyone familiar with this. As I understand it, it's a long acting antihisimine type of thing. I'm all for it, if it would really work.
 

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I thought allergy shots were this:

Once your dog has been allergy tested, you will move on to the allergy shot treatment. Allergy shots, more officially known as hyposensitization, involve injecting your dog with small amounts of the allergens that were identified during their allergy test. This type of therapy is designed to “reprogram” your dog’s immune system so that it becomes less reactive to these allergens.

When you first start this process, you will need to help your dog (and you!) to slowly adjust to the injections. For the first month, the injections will be a very small amount and will take place every other day. Then, depending on the severity of your dog’s allergies, their veterinarian will prescribe injections every 1-3 weeks. If this form of treatment appears to be helping your dog, it will likely need to continue for the rest of your dog’s life.

Hyposensitization benefits 68%-85% of the dogs who are placed on this form of treatment. You should not expect to see any significant improvement for the first 4-6 months of injections. And, it may take as long as 12 months before the improvements are truly noticeable. We started to notice improvements in Elsie’s skin and overall health in less than four months.

Perhaps the biggest adjustment for us was learning to be confident when administering the shots. Neither my husband nor I are medical professionals. We were both concerned that we would “hurt” Elsie during the injections and cause her to be scared and traumatized – making the process all that much more difficult. However, over time, my husband has become the main “shot giver” in the family and has become quite skilled and proficient. His technique is to be calm and quick, so as not to make Elsie nervous. Then, he follows with a dog treat – which always makes these procedures much more tolerable.

We keep a regular supply of syringes, which are provided by our dermatologist office along with the vaccine. The vaccine is kept in our refrigerator, never frozen, just kept cool.

Since these injections will need to occur for your dog’s lifetime, most people choose to perform the injections themselves. However, if you really cannot stomach the idea of giving your dog a shot, you should contact your local veterinarian to see if they can assist with your regular injections.
I don't know about dogs, but my husband's best friend is a million times better now that he's getting shots for his allergies.
 

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Maddie has multiple allergies, and one is grass (great, right?). She's consequently itchy, mainly her paws. Right now, I'm giving her 1/2 a Benadryl 2x daily, but it doesn't help much.
How much does your dog weigh? It's 1mg/lb for the dog's dosage.

My Loki has seasonal allergies too.. but the Benadryl does seem to do the trick with him.
 

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Maddie's only 12 1/2 pounds, so 1/2 a Benadryl should be enough, but I've been thinking about increasing it to a whole tablet 2x daily to see if this will help. I think she must also have some other allergies besides grass. We've tried all sorts of kibbles (grain free), as well as pre made raw (both chicken and beef varieties). Nothing has caused an improvement. Luckily, she doesn't lick herself raw. Without the Benadryl, she's worse (red ears, increased chewing on paws).
 

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I had a dog that developed a wheat allergy and became extremely itchy as well. Before this happened to me, I always thought that all the discussion about wheat allergies etc in dogs was kind of hype. It took me a long time to figure out by observing when she was worse and changing foods etc to figure it out. Once I switched her to grain free, she became somewhat better but it took about 3 months for serious improvement and 6 months for total control. One cue was that every time my kids dropped some quantities of cereal or bread for her to get into, she had flare ups. 6 months on grain free resolved the problem. There is often a secondary component of yeast infection (first in the ears and then on the skin) with these things. The itchiest spots tend to be between the pads/toes and under the armspits, ears etc. I fell in love with the Blue Wilderness brand but you could try others. Just my experience. Good luck, it's hard to watch them so uncomfortable. Don't let the vet get you on steriods without serious dietary and other measures first because the steriods really damage their health long term.
 

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Is this the injection that your vet wants to give or is giving? http://www.drugs.com/vet/depo-medrol.html The vet I work for only does this type of injection in severe cases of skin inflammation or allegeries. You can give benadryl up to three times daily. It would be safer than doing the depo injection. We have one cat who's allergies are so severe that she lived with an elizabeth collar 24hrs a day. She is now on cyclosporine and is doing extremely well. No more e-collar!
 

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Is this the injection that your vet wants to give or is giving? http://www.drugs.com/vet/depo-medrol.html The vet I work for only does this type of injection in severe cases of skin inflammation or allegeries. You can give benadryl up to three times daily. It would be safer than doing the depo injection. We have one cat who's allergies are so severe that she lived with an elizabeth collar 24hrs a day. She is now on cyclosporine and is doing extremely well. No more e-collar!
My vet didn't recommend this; a vet tech acquaintance did. Thanks for clearing up the name of it for me! I haven't had this done - I'm still just giving Maddie 1/2 benadryl twice daily. I may try 3x daily. I tried a whole tablet ONCE, and it totally zonked her out, poor thing! I won't do that again.

I had a dog that developed a wheat allergy and became extremely itchy as well. Before this happened to me, I always thought that all the discussion about wheat allergies etc in dogs was kind of hype. It took me a long time to figure out by observing when she was worse and changing foods etc to figure it out. Once I switched her to grain free, she became somewhat better but it took about 3 months for serious improvement and 6 months for total control. One cue was that every time my kids dropped some quantities of cereal or bread for her to get into, she had flare ups. 6 months on grain free resolved the problem. There is often a secondary component of yeast infection (first in the ears and then on the skin) with these things. The itchiest spots tend to be between the pads/toes and under the armspits, ears etc. I fell in love with the Blue Wilderness brand but you could try others. Just my experience. Good luck, it's hard to watch them so uncomfortable. Don't let the vet get you on steriods without serious dietary and other measures first because the steriods really damage their health long term.
I'd heard it takes awhile to clear up, but I didn't realize it could take this long. I guess I need to be more patient! I currently have her on Nature's Instinct Pre Made Raw Beef. Luckily, she's small, so the cost isn't too prohibitive. She seems worse on kibble, esp. ones that contain potato, much less any grain. The Nature's Variety Instinct sounded good until I found out it contains alfalfa meal - why???? Maddie seems to be really allergic to grass - ugh!

My vet isn't recommending steroids yet. Maddie chews on her lower legs and paws, but they're not raw; just pink. Her ears also get red, esp. if I don't give her the Benadryl. Her tummy and armpits are fine, although she has dark, rough spots around her nipples (she had puppies before we adopted her, if that makes a difference). The Benadryl doesn't stop the itchiness, but it definitely helps. She hasn't been on the Instinct Raw that long; hopefully I'll see improvement eventually, especially since it's so expensive!

Thanks for everyone's replies - this forum's the best!
 
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