Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
About Me:

I'm currently a student and also work part time. I live with my parents and two brothers, an 8 year old and a high schooler. However, I don't know how much I trust them to care for a puppy in my absence. Even if I do my best to educate them, I'd imagine them not having the patience or understanding to do things "the right way." Despite this, I'm sure potty breaks and maybe some play sessions shouldn't be too much to ask if need be. I live in an apartment and this would be my first dog that is 100% my responsibility.

What I'm looking for:
  • Small to medium sized (as it would spend most of it's time living with me in my bedroom.)
  • Minimal grooming. I don't mind a daily brush, but I'd rather not have a coat that needs constant groomer attention. (e.g Poodle) I don't mind shedding.
  • Content with an hour of exercise a day. Two half hour walks and a training session? On my days off I can go all day. Of course I can always work with less. I would really like at least a morning walk though, gotta stay active!
  • Weather tolerant. I live in Canada, so cold winters and hot summers. I don't mind investing in snow gear if need be, but I don't want the poor guy to ever feel uncomfortable.
  • Trainable/Biddable. If for nothing else than to show off, I'd love to teach fun tricks.
  • Healthy. I know this one is hard to determine, but some breeds are notorious for having a myriad of heath issues (e.g CKCS) and while I do plan to set aside money for emergencies, Pet Insurance in Canada doesn't seem as good as in the US.
I'd prefer a puppy. I've been to a few shelters/rescue's, but a lot of the puppies adult size's are up in the air. Same goes for temperament, and genetic/health issues. Also, not having a house/yard doesn't really make me a great candidate. While it is still an option, I'm still not completely comfortable going that route. If I do go with a breeder I will be sure to find a reputable one.

I'm flexible. If I'm asking too much or have to make a compromise, I'm willing. Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm 20. If I ever move the dog would be coming with me for sure. But for the foreseeable future, I'll be living at home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Tons of medium size dogs at the Shelter as far as I can see-- for tricks and such I would pick a Poo mix, otherwise for easygoing there seems to be plenty of Hound/ Lab mixes out there and Pit mix can be fab family dogs too.. Have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Tons of medium size dogs at the Shelter as far as I can see-- for tricks and such I would pick a Poo mix, otherwise for easygoing there seems to be plenty of Hound/ Lab mixes out there and Pit mix can be fab family dogs too.. Have fun!
What exactly constitutes as a medium sized breed? Maybe I'm looking for toy to small. I know a lab mix would be far too large for my apartment. Pit's are also banned in my area. It's a shame too, cause I grew up with the sweetest APBT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts
For a first time dog, I recommend a rescue adult Lab.
1. You can ask the rescue to match you with an apartment Lab, with your energy level.
2. You get a house-trained dog with a fairly predictable personality.
3. Labs love the cold. They are biddable and easy to train. If you don't mind, they are not too big for an apartment or bedroom.
4. Most Important: They are Very forgiving of new owner mistakes.

You cannot depend on your brothers for training, playing, or appropriate feeding. Teenage boys play roughly, 8 yo don't have the patience. But a Lab recovers from mistakes. Warning: A Lab puppy is a very different creature from a different galaxy than a Lab adult :)

If you need a small dog, a Bichon Frise is like a miniature Lab, except you'll have to learn to groom it, and they want more human contact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,765 Posts
What's your range for "medium"? Some people think 25 pounds is medium, some think 50 pounds.

I've seen smaller Lab mixes. They're generally nice dogs. A Poodle mix might be OK, but then again you didn't want to have to take the dog to the groomer (I don't think any breed needs "constant" grooming if kept in a pet cut). It's kind of hard because most small dogs need a lot of grooming, and most "easy" dogs are large. Maybe a Papillon? But they may be higher-energy than you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,220 Posts
A bichon came to mind when I was reading your description.

However, I caution you to be prepared for moving around. It's going to be harder and more expensive to find an apartment with ANY size dog. My pet rent is $25 which is a steal compared to apartments and houses inside of Denver city limits. Some places charge $100/month in addition to a $300 pet deposit.

I got my dog while I was in school and living with my mother and she has been with me through every move and boughts of unemployment. I'm sure other college students can pull it off too if they're committed. Remember that this is a lifetime commitment(10-16 years or more if you're lucky).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,301 Posts
Maybe a JRT, might be abit to active for you, you can get long haired ones, King Charles Spaniel, Cocker spaniel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Check out the Boykin Spaniel. Here's some info about the breed:
-->>http://voices.yahoo.com/the-boykin-spaniel-excellent-family-pet-versatile-11037392.html?cat=53<<--
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Exactly how much exercise would a Papillon or JRT require? Or does 'high energy' imply something else?

Cocker Spaniel seems to be another popular one. How are their coats/grooming requirements?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
As for Papillon exercise, it can vary a lot.

My dog is fine with a 1-1.5 hour walk/run at the park and play sessions at the house.

From what I understand, however, Laurelin's Mia likes a lot more, especially when she was a puppy.

I will say that a Papillon does seem to fit a lot of your criteria. They have long hair but it's a single coat, so it's very easy to groom and doesn't shed as much as others. In the winter you will probably need to get him/her a coat of some sort, just because they are so small. On the small note, your youngest brother will need to be monitored with the dog at all times. A toy puppy is a very small thing and could easily be hurt on accident.
For the most part Papillons are a healthy breed, living into their teens, but like a lot of breeds there are a few things to look out for such as PRA and Patellar Luxation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,301 Posts
It would depend on the dog, it would also depend on what the parents are like and the pups background, for example Holly is a BC and from a working background and my auntie's BC is not, and my auntie's BC has only upto an hour a day, Holly can and has gone non stop for hours in any weather, rescue's should know how much engery the dog has, and you could ask the breeders what the parents are like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
As for Papillon exercise, it can vary a lot.

My dog is fine with a 1-1.5 hour walk/run at the park and play sessions at the house.

From what I understand, however, Laurelin's Mia likes a lot more, especially when she was a puppy.

I will say that a Papillon does seem to fit a lot of your criteria. They have long hair but it's a single coat, so it's very easy to groom and doesn't shed as much as others. In the winter you will probably need to get him/her a coat of some sort, just because they are so small. On the small note, your youngest brother will need to be monitored with the dog at all times. A toy puppy is a very small thing and could easily be hurt on accident.
For the most part Papillons are a healthy breed, living into their teens, but like a lot of breeds there are a few things to look out for such as PRA and Patellar Luxation.
Thanks. I definitely should be able to make time for an hour or so of exercise a day.

How are they in terms of being left alone? I know they're a companion breed, so not too well I suppose? Approximately (I know it varies) how many hours can I leave one on it's own before it becomes cruel?

In a household of 5, someone usually IS home. But being home and giving a puppy attention are two different things. While I'm sure everyone will love the little guy, I've also got to make sure they're trained before I can leave them unsupervised with a puppy.

The last thing I want to do is come home and find out they've shoved the poor guy's nose in his puddle, because they didn't know any better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,018 Posts
I actually thought papillon if you want a toy sized dog.

Mia as a puppy was a nightmare as far as exercise goes. I was out for at least 2 hours a day wearing her out, plus three hours training at class, but she's three now and is a very adaptable dog. She hasn't had much the past two days and is fine. I will say she's not a 'sleep all day' kind of dog, but I don't mind that she's playing instead of sleeping, and I'm also okay with kicking a ball for her while I'm getting ready in the mornings, etc. Mia will go forever if you want but she’s okay without. If she needs exercise she can be destructive and hyper and demanding but she’s really not that bad. But it’s taken work to make her adaptable.

My other paps have been a lot milder. Beau was an exceptionally easy puppy. Bernard had his moments but is now very mellow. Rose has always been really calm and quiet. Talk to the breeder about what you want in a dog.

I work full time so 40 hours a week, some days am gone 10 hours. They are fine. Summer had separation anxiety when I got her but is fine with Mia around. but I got her as an adult from a house with a lot of other dogs so I suspect that was the factor. They're very very social dogs so do definitely expect to spend QUALITY time with them daily and lots of it. But it doesn’t have to be anything special. Mine are content to hang out and snuggle an evening or two a week. We also do some good off leash hiking many nights and take agility classes too.

My sister was 6 years old when we got our first papillon. She's lived with 7 so far and does fabulous with them. It really depends on the kid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
if you live in an apartment, has the landlord been notified and asked about their feelings on a pet? and what are their restrictions? size/breed restrictions apply in a lot of apartments.... also has the family been asked about this? what are your parents feelings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Thank you Laurelin! A papillon does seem like it would be a good fit. I'll definitely be doing a ton of research, but it is nice to have the insight from all you experienced owners. When the time comes, the breeder will definitely be getting a novel's worth of information from me.

if you live in an apartment, has the landlord been notified and asked about their feelings on a pet? and what are their restrictions? size/breed restrictions apply in a lot of apartments.... also has the family been asked about this? what are your parents feelings?
My building is pet friendly, as are most (if not all) of the apartments in my area. In my building alone I know of a Golden Retriever, a Yorkshire Terrier, a Chow Chow and one other mysterious barky breed that live here.

As far as my parents go, as long as I take full responsibility, I could own a rhino if I wanted to. They're very gracious in that aspect.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top