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Alright... so I was out playing Frisbee in the yard with Jake today, and at first I had two in play(to get him in the habit of bringing the thing back lol). He would bring back the first one, I'd immediately throw the second one when he dropped it, etc etc. Went great. So I left one on the ground by me, and started just throwing the first one... which is when the odd behavior starts. It's happened before, but I'm curious enough now that I decided to post about it

It's almost like I can't throw it fast enough for him. He'll drop it, and start whining. I'll bend down to pick it up, and he'll continue to whine, nipping and tugging slightly at my coat sleeves, or my hands... it's gotten up by my ear once or twice(which concerns and annoys me), but mostly it's the shoulder area of my coat. He does NOT usually nip, so this is an isolated thing.

So am I right that this whining nipping thing is just an outlet for his excitement, and him telling me to hurry up and throw it? I don't mind the whining, but the nipping tends to make me a bit nervous, and I don't like it at all. What I've been doing to keep him from doing that is put him in a Sit/Wait. Jake listens, but keeps up the whining and watches me as I pick it up. I give him the release word right before I throw the Frisbee.

This keeps him in one place and stops him from nipping. Should I continue doing this, and eventually he'll get the point that nipping at me while I'm trying to pick it up does not get the Frisbee thrown? Or should I change my tactic a bit and wait for him to sit before I pick it up, and if he makes to nip at me stand and turn away until he figures it out on his own?

Sorry this post got a bit long. I am just curious, and would like to stop this nipping thing :rolleyes:
 

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Yeah, chances are he's just excited and really into the game. He wants you to keep playing and is eager to go after the frisbee again. Wally will do something similar if I pretend I'm not looking, just to see what he'd do. He'll pick up the object and then drop it forcefully. If that doesn't work, he's thrown the object at me - or put it down (or more like slam it down) and then start huff and puffing and barking and whining :)

Sure, there's no problem with teaching him the behavior you'd want him to do instead of the nipping. In fact, teaching it this way will help him want to do it (The Premack Principle), not to mention he's learning while having fun - always a good thing :)

Keep doing it. He'll learn what to do when he wants to "ask" you for another throw.

Once he learns that you want him to sit to "ask" for a throw, sure, make him wait longer. Helps him stay under control even when excited and eager and also might teach him to focus on you as a nice side effect.

If he nips, turning away can let him know that wasn't what you wanted. Then turn back, ask for a sit (if he's not sitting already, he might start offering it after the nipping didn't work to see if sitting is the behavior you're looking for), give your release, then resume the game.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, chances are he's just excited and really into the game. He wants you to keep playing and is eager to go after the frisbee again. Wally will do something similar if I pretend I'm not looking, just to see what he'd do. He'll pick up the object and then drop it forcefully. If that doesn't work, he's thrown the object at me - or put it down (or more like slam it down) and then start huff and puffing and barking and whining :)
Jake will do that with his tennis balls and toys inside :D just replace the barking and whining with staring intensely at me lol.

Thanks for the input, I thought that was the best way to go about it. I took him back outside after dinner, and played some more. Of course he decides to change tactics and instead of nipping he opts for crouching down and backing up. So either my attempts earlier had some sort of effect, or he's just calmer now, or my dog is playing mind games with me... :rolleyes:

I'll try it again tomorrow. But I cut it a bit short because he scared me half to death. He was running back to me and tripped on something, yelped really loud and came back limping, pressed himself up against my legs whining and holding his paw up. I put him in a stay and ran to the door, yelling at my dad... so our other dog, Buck comes to the door with my parents and runs out and Jake engages in play with him and runs around without a limp. :eek:

He was just being a mama's boy and scaring me half to death, when probably all he did was poke himself on something.

The stinker.
 

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Just an update... I hope it's ok to just do a new post after this long... The techniques seem to be working so far. The nipping is less frequent. Also he hadn't been doing this behavior with Tennis Balls or any of his other toys, only frisbees, so in addition to working at getting rid of the nipping thing I'm repeating what I remember of how I taught him to bring back his tennis balls and things with the frisbees.

Another question. What about teaching him to take food from my fingers gently? Does anyone have any tips on that?
 

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Hello, I am new to the forum, and I was interested with in your post about your dog nipping you when you throw him his frizby.

You say in your post that you have had some succsess with training your dog not to nip you, when he takes his frizby, and in your last post you are interested in feeding him treats for example, whithout him nipping you.

I would try giving him toys for example to take from you to begin with, and when he is taking them gently, then move on to smaller items like treats.

I taught my dogs not to snatch things i offer them as soon as I could. Kane learned quite quickly, but Otto was a little stubborn.

I would offer them a toy, and if the dog snatched, I would tell him "No". When he let go, I would offe him the toy again, and at the same time say "take nice". When he took nice, I would let him have the toy.

I graduated to treats, by giving larger treats, and making them smaller, each time, telling them to take nice. Eventually I would make the treats so small, they would just lick at my fingers for the treat.

Start big and gradually get smaller with treats, but begin with toys for example, and don't move on until your dog is taking the all the toys you give him gently.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Hello, I am new to the forum, and I was interested with in your post about your dog nipping you when you throw him his frizby.

You say in your post that you have had some succsess with training your dog not to nip you, when he takes his frizby, and in your last post you are interested in feeding him treats for example, whithout him nipping you.

I would try giving him toys for example to take from you to begin with, and when he is taking them gently, then move on to smaller items like treats.

I taught my dogs not to snatch things i offer them as soon as I could. Kane learned quite quickly, but Otto was a little stubborn.

I would offer them a toy, and if the dog snatched, I would tell him "No". When he let go, I would offer him the toy again, and at the same time say "take nice". When he took nice, I would let him have the toy.

I graduated to treats, by giving larger treats, and making them smaller, each time, telling them to take nice. Eventually I would make the treats so small, they would just lick at my fingers for the treat.

Start big and gradually get smaller with treats, but begin with toys for example, and don't move on until your dog is taking the all the toys you give him gently.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
Thanks for the advice :) But the problem with him nipping when it comes to the frisbee is when I lean down to pick up the frisbee off the ground. It's like he gets overly excited, and he nips at my arm to get me to hurry up and throw it. The strange thing about that is he doesn't do the same when I pick up a tennis ball, or his stuffed pig or rope toy. When taking a toy from my hand he is quite gentle. But I think I understand what you mean graduating the treats smaller and smaller while I train him to take them gently- I'll start trying that. Thanks! I appreciate the help.
 

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Another question. What about teaching him to take food from my fingers gently? Does anyone have any tips on that?
This is how I did it (actually still working on it but have had LOTS of improvements) He doesn't get the food unless he's EASY. When I go to give Jaia ANYTHING from my hand, I remind him, "Easy". And I hold it in my hand tightly enough so that if he's not easy, I can take it back. So, the only way he can get it is by being easy.

Another way is to hold a piece of food in your fist. The dog will smell around and be interested. As soon as he stops and looks away from your hand, open it and let him take it from your palm. That encourages the dog to be in a "zen state" when getting food. Zen
 

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I understand. You could try waiting for him to drop the frizbee and then when he backs away, put your foot on it. Get him to sit, then bend down slowly and at the same time make I contact and tell him to stay. Looking at him allows you to watch him closely, to see when or if he is about to move. If it looks like he is about to move, repeat the command for him to sit. If he rushes you can then just stand up and refuse to part take in the game till he moves away from the frizbee. I think eventually, he will prefer to play by your rules, rather than not at all. Learning is the same for dogs as it is for us I think, in that sometimes we have to do the things we don't like to get the things we like. Good luck.
 

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Thanks for the advice, ivanoj and FourIsCompany.

FourIsCompany- I'll try the 'Easy' idea. He's really smart so I'm sure he'll pick up on it quick... I'm just tired of getting my fingers pinched!

Ivanoj- that's what I've been doing. I'll keep it up now that I know it seems to be the best way to go about it.

He also likes to play 'chase me and my frisbee!' if I don't have something to trade him... I think that'll just take repetition and practice though. He'll come right over to me with it when I start to go inside or walk the opposite direction.
 

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You could teach him to hand just hand it you, then your still standing up and ready to throw it quicker.

My old dog hardly ever dropped the frisbee, she would hand it up to me and jump in her "take off" position and wait for me to throw.

She'd throw the tennis ball at me at times when she really got going. Saved me all that bending over all the time to pick it up. I just gently grabbed it and no tugging, if she tugged it just came right out of mu hand and I stood there with an open hand waiting.

I taught her to put it in my lap when I was sitting, which she did forever more when she wanted to get me to take her out and play fetch. Come plop it in my lap, sit and stare at me and huff puff and groan. But she knew I was a sucker and would always go play.
 

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I just use NILIF with things like this..

Have the dog sit and wait until i throw it again... i bend down to grab it.. he moves, i stand straight and don't move until he sits and waits, then i bend down to take it, and so until he understands he must wait if he wants to play MY way with MY toys.
 

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I agree. I had a large rubber ball my dog enjoyed playing with. I would keep it in a basket and bring it with me when we went out. Because he was not allowed access to the ball all the time, he was very eager to to play fetch; good exercise for him, and also learn new behaviours, as the ball became a really good motivator for him.
 
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