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I guess I’m trying to determine if my pup could be in pain with this post.

I have a 10 month old lab. We go for a daily walk that takes between 20-35 minutes. After the walk she is absolutely done. She’ll sleep for the rest of the day (besides maybe some light playing). We just started consistently walking since she was 7 months (the weather was finally nice enough) and since then she’s always been like this. I’m wondering if this is normal for a pup of her age/breed?

I’m thinking she may have a hip issue and just want to get all the details before heading to the vet (which will be happening no matter what)
 

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Can't diagnose over the Web, only a Vet visit will tell. What happens if you try to walk for 40 minutes to an hour - is she too tired? A typical, healthy 10 mos Lab can easily run for 30 min., nonstop ... unless the dog is overweight, or unless she is hot. However, after exercise or training, it is not unusual for a Lab to sleep for the rest of the day, especially if she is left alone while you work or do chores.

As an aside, we had an unusual snow this year, and my Lab mix ... never stopped running. Even after 2 hours, he still had plenty of energy, although he did sleep well the rest of the day.
 

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Definitely not trying to get a diagnosis, just wondering if she could be in pain. She’s not overweight by any means and I’m careful about her in the heat. After a 30 minute walk she is just wiped out. I’ve tried giving her two walks a day (a 30 minute one and a 20 minute one) and on the second walk we don’t even get down the block without her looking absolutely tired.

I was gently stretching out her leg this morning and I head some cracks (like how knuckles crack) and I could feel some popping in her knee. I have a feeling that it’s not normal so I’ll be calling the vet about it tomorrow
 

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A roughly 1 year old Lab that cannot keep up with 2 walks each day, barring high heat/humidity, does sound like something might be up medically. Looking absolutely tired within a block of walking at a human's walking pace is unusual in my observation. Walking speed is typically easy peasy for dogs, they get the most out of walks based on sniffing and observing the world rather than strictly the cardio aspect of it.

Sleeping all day isn't unusual in that most dogs sleep when nothing is happening, but sleeping and not wanting to get up and play or walk when given the option isn't as normal.

What temperatures are you walking in? How much full sun?

Along with asking the vet about her joints (knees and hips), if nothing is obvious to the vet about her joints then ask about a getting a blood panel and a thyroid test. Around here (medium midwestern city), a complete blood panel runs about $60-70. Dunno what a thyroid test should run but guessing around the same range. Could be a metabolism type issue.
 

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Temperature is usually in the low 70s. 80 degrees is usually the hottest that i'll make her go on a walk (on those days she has at least 2 water breaks. When the sun is out we're in it about 75% of the time. but often where i live it's on the cloudier side.

She's a service dog in training and i'm her foster home. I contacted the organization's vet today about it and well... didn't really get a serious response. They are refusing to do x-rays until she is a year old and while she's there on Wednesday (for a different thing) they'll take a look at her knees- i don't know if this means x-rays or not (but i'm guessing not). but I'm definitely thinking it's a leg issue the more i watch her. So now i'm left frustrated and annoyed at the organization... again. ugh.

at this point I'm hoping she get's kicked out of the program so i can adopt her and give her the care she deserves.
 

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Keep in mind that on a 77F degree day ashphalt and concrete can reach temperatures of 125F in full sun, which is hot enough to cause minor burns on sensitive pads. The concrete temp gets even hotter in temps over 80 degrees. If she's not keeping up with walks, or wanting to be active after them, this could part of your problem.
 

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Temperature is usually in the low 70s. 80 degrees is usually the hottest that i'll make her go on a walk (on those days she has at least 2 water breaks. When the sun is out we're in it about 75% of the time. but often where i live it's on the cloudier side.

She's a service dog in training and i'm her foster home. I contacted the organization's vet today about it and well... didn't really get a serious response. They are refusing to do x-rays until she is a year old and while she's there on Wednesday (for a different thing) they'll take a look at her knees- i don't know if this means x-rays or not (but i'm guessing not). but I'm definitely thinking it's a leg issue the more i watch her. So now i'm left frustrated and annoyed at the organization... again. ugh.

at this point I'm hoping she get's kicked out of the program so i can adopt her and give her the care she deserves.
Service dogs are working animals. If this dog is slated for hearing dog or guide dog there are temperament requirements such as spending large amounts of time being still (as in a work environment).

There are things YOU can do to check the dog. When the dog is cool (as in the evening when the dog has not been doing a lot) you can take the dog's temperature. Should be 101 or around that. You can also monitor the amount of water she is taking in by measuring the water you put in the bowl and then measuring it back out of the bowl before you refill it so you can see exactly how much the dog drinks. You probably are already measuring the food.

Having service dogs here where I work and seeing their temperament they are very similar to your puppy. In fact, he does not sound ill. He sounds like he may be perfectly bred for the job.
 

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Service dogs are working animals. If this dog is slated for hearing dog or guide dog there are temperament requirements such as spending large amounts of time being still (as in a work environment).

There are things YOU can do to check the dog. When the dog is cool (as in the evening when the dog has not been doing a lot) you can take the dog's temperature. Should be 101 or around that. You can also monitor the amount of water she is taking in by measuring the water you put in the bowl and then measuring it back out of the bowl before you refill it so you can see exactly how much the dog drinks. You probably are already measuring the food.

Having service dogs here where I work and seeing their temperament they are very similar to your puppy. In fact, he does not sound ill. He sounds like he may be perfectly bred for the job.
I won't disagree about a service dog needing to have a very good "off switch" but this doesn't sound like an indoor/chill time off-switch to me...

and on the second walk we don’t even get down the block without her looking absolutely tired.
A service dog should have a steady temperament, ready to walk when the owner needs to walk and ready to settle quietly when the owner needs to work. Not having the energy or the interest in a 2nd short walk in a day is unusual and not desirable.
 

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I won't disagree about a service dog needing to have a very good "off switch" but this doesn't sound like an indoor/chill time off-switch to me...



A service dog should have a steady temperament, ready to walk when the owner needs to walk and ready to settle quietly when the owner needs to work. Not having the energy or the interest in a 2nd short walk in a day is unusual and not desirable.
Yep.

The ability to chill, take a nap and be still has not one single thing to do with stamina in any regard. A young lab, especially one who is going to do service work does need to be able to lay down and relax, or even nap. It also needs to be willing and able to get up and GO and have the stamina and health, to do that for many hours when it's asked for/necessary.
 
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