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Discussion Starter #1
I am reading up on the temperaments of American Eskimo's and Pom's today as I may have the chance to rescue a puppy of this cross. I speak to the contact person tonight. The american eskimo temperment looks like it would fit with our family, and our other puppy. But the Pom temperament looks like it could pose a problem. So I am hoping that some of you here have experience with the cross breed of them to know what the generalized temperament is. Obviously each dog is different, and it depends on the training etc. BUt what is the common/general temperament of them? As well do you know of health issues that are common etc for this beed? I know with my currently puppy because she is a giant breed there is the possiblity of hip issues etc. Looking for information like that about this breed.

Even once I have the info and talk with teh contact person I will be bringing my puppy and kids along to meet the possible rescue and see interactions etc. Other than full out attacking each other, what are red flags that this is not a good fit during that initial meeting?
 

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I don't know much about American Eskimos but owned a pom for 15 years and will be getting another early next year. What were your concerns about the pom side of the mix?

Off the top of my head, health problems poms are prone to are:
-Teeth and gum issues. Poms need regular teeth brushing and cleanings as they're prone to tartar build up which can result in teeth needing to be pulled, or infection if not taken care of.
-Luxating patella. I'm not sure if this is mostly isolated to smaller poms. I never had this issue with my pom.
-Black skin disease. This is an inherited condition that causes a pom to lose its fur in large patches. It's not actually life-threatening, however.
-Collapsed trachea. I see a lot of debate as to whether this is a genetic issue or the result of using choke-style collars. I see a lot of breeders these days recommend harnesses rather than any kind of collar for walking a pom.
-"Teacup" poms can have a myriad of other health issues such as enlarged hearts but again I assume this wouldn't be an issue with a pom/eskimo mix.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't know much about American Eskimos but owned a pom for 15 years and will be getting another early next year. What were your concerns about the pom side of the mix?

Off the top of my head, health problems poms are prone to are:
-Teeth and gum issues. Poms need regular teeth brushing and cleanings as they're prone to tartar build up which can result in teeth needing to be pulled, or infection if not taken care of.
-Luxating patella. I'm not sure if this is mostly isolated to smaller poms. I never had this issue with my pom.
-Black skin disease. This is an inherited condition that causes a pom to lose its fur in large patches. It's not actually life-threatening, however.
-Collapsed trachea. I see a lot of debate as to whether this is a genetic issue or the result of using choke-style collars. I see a lot of breeders these days recommend harnesses rather than any kind of collar for walking a pom.
-"Teacup" poms can have a myriad of other health issues such as enlarged hearts but again I assume this wouldn't be an issue with a pom/eskimo mix.
My main concern was many sites I read saying Poms were not suited for families with small children because they are so possesive and prone to small dog syndrome. As I have young children and run a home daycare that is of particular concern.

THank you for the list of health concerns. I already brush my puppy's teeth so adding another dog to our routine in that regard would be easy enough, and had spoken to my vet about annual dental cleanings for my current pup so would do that for another one. That is very good to know about the risk of collars. I was going to buy a harness for my current pup anyway so I could pick up another. Off to see what the signs of luxating patella is and to check for black skin disease. So with that one it is just unsightly right? not something my other pup could catch?

Any ideas of what to watch for as red flag behaviours if/when we go to see the dog?
 

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Possessiveness and "small dog syndrome" are training issues. If you raise and train the pup properly and teach the kids to respect the dog, there shouldn't be any problems---more than any other dog anyway. I don't really think any dog is appropriate for a daycare (I wouldn't send my kid to a daycare with a dog that has free roam among the kids), but since you already have one dog I guess that's moot. Keep in mind that small dogs are delicate and easily injured by normal kid behavior.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Possessiveness and "small dog syndrome" are training issues. If you raise and train the pup properly and teach the kids to respect the dog, there shouldn't be any problems---more than any other dog anyway. I don't really think any dog is appropriate for a daycare (I wouldn't send my kid to a daycare with a dog that has free roam among the kids), but since you already have one dog I guess that's moot. Keep in mind that small dogs are delicate and easily injured by normal kid behavior.
WHile it is called a home daycare it is not the same here as an actual daycare. As long as the dog has it's shots and is trained it's no problem. Parents chose my home because they want their kids in a home not a daycare. The kids I watch join in as a member of a family complete with being around animals (and being a rural locale most of the kids I currently watch or previously did have no less than 2 pets, most are farm kids), participating in everyday life with us kwim.

That is good to know that they are training issues. Training things I can work with and make sure the pup grows up to have appropriate behaviours etc.
 

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I understand what home daycares are. I still don't think dogs should be living in a daycare situation (unless they're kept in another part of the home and have no/very little contact with the non-family kids). Dogs are dogs, no matter how well trained they are, and kids are kids. And if something happens, the dog ends up dead and a kid ends up hurt. I don't like it. But that's just my personal opinion :).

How old is the pup?
 

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I was in fourth grade when we got our pom, my brother was two years younger. They're definitely doable with kids but it requires training both the dog and the kids, as Willowy said. If children are taught to be gentle with a pom and the pom is well-socialized, it's not an issue. Poms typically don't react well to having ears or tails pulled or being grabbed suddenly, in my experience, so I can see how a lot of strange kids in a daycare scenario would be an issue, since you can't necessarily guarantee they'll all behave well around the dog. But of course it depends on the dog's individual temperament. Is he currently being housed at a shelter or foster home? If so, the foster or volunteers may be able to tell you more about his disposition towards kids, and visiting with your children should also help give you an idea of how he reacts to new people.

When I did shelter volunteer work, poms with socialization issues were pretty obvious when you first met them. A poorly socialized pomeranian is very uncomfortable around strangers, and will usually growl or run away when approached. If he's cautious/shy that's not necessarily a red flag, but it may indicate he needs to be approached calmly and slowly, as it may just mean he's wary of new people and needs time to see that they're safe. And of course if he's super relaxed and not at all concerned by new people coming up to him, then that's a sign that he's very well-socialized.

Yeah black skin disease wouldn't be a concern for your other dog. And yup it's purely cosmetic. Here's a little more info on it: http://www.petwave.com/Dogs/Dog-Health-Center/Skin-Disorders/Black-Skin-Disease/Overview.aspx
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I understand what home daycares are. I still don't think dogs should be living in a daycare situation (unless they're kept in another part of the home and have no/very little contact with the non-family kids). Dogs are dogs, no matter how well trained they are, and kids are kids. And if something happens, the dog ends up dead and a kid ends up hurt. I don't like it. But that's just my personal opinion :).

How old is the pup?
I am unsure yet. I need to speak to the contact person tonight to find out for sure. I am hoping it is still quite young so that like my current pup I can start training from the get go without trying to undue bad training or lack of training already ingrained kwim. BUt a pup that is older and a good fit temperament wise and one that has begun good training already I would consider for sure. It will depend on what the contact person says tonight.

As for the home daycare it is your perogative as a parent to chose not to place your child in a setting with a pet. The kids are not left unsupervised with the dog and are trained as much as the dog (or any pet for that matter) in appropriate pet behaviours. The parents that chose me like that we have a pet. That's the great thing about childcare each parent can find the right setting for their child. It is no different for us having an extra child here than it is having my own children here. (I only take 1-2 children at a time for my daycare as I already have 4 of my own home all day, 2 of my own being teens).
 

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Small dog syndrome is not a temperament issue, it's a training issue. Basically, if you have a 90lb GSD mix, you'll train that dog, because if you don't, no one will be safe, not you or anyone around you. Even an enthusiastic greeting can be dangerous from a large dog. That's not an issue with small dogs, so a lot of owners of small dogs don't bother to train their dog at all and end up with a poorly behaved little monster. Then they have the nerve to blame the dog for its problems!

As for tracheal collapse, that happened to my boss' pom. I know they were using a flat buckle collar, and I find it hard to believe either he or his wife were jerking the dog around by the collar, and then switched to a harness afterwards.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was in fourth grade when we got our pom, my brother was two years younger. They're definitely doable with kids but it requires training both the dog and the kids, as Willowy said. If children are taught to be gentle with a pom and the pom is well-socialized, it's not an issue. Poms typically don't react well to having ears or tails pulled or being grabbed suddenly, in my experience, so I can see how a lot of strange kids in a daycare scenario would be an issue, since you can't necessarily guarantee they'll all behave well around the dog. But of course it depends on the dog's individual temperament. Is he currently being housed at a shelter or foster home? If so, the foster or volunteers may be able to tell you more about his disposition towards kids, and visiting with your children should also help give you an idea of how he reacts to new people.

When I did shelter volunteer work, poms with socialization issues were pretty obvious when you first met them. A poorly socialized pomeranian is very uncomfortable around strangers, and will usually growl or run away when approached. If he's cautious/shy that's not necessarily a red flag, but it may indicate he needs to be approached calmly and slowly, as it may just mean he's wary of new people and needs time to see that they're safe. And of course if he's super relaxed and not at all concerned by new people coming up to him, then that's a sign that he's very well-socialized.

Yeah black skin disease wouldn't be a concern for your other dog. And yup it's purely cosmetic. Here's a little more info on it: http://www.petwave.com/Dogs/Dog-Health-Center/Skin-Disorders/Black-Skin-Disease/Overview.aspx
Thank you for this. The people caring for this dog have been running a private rescue of them so they have a few in their home not a shelter. I did explain in my above response about how having a dog in our daycare works. Mainly because I only take 1-2 daycare kids at anytime and they are trained (as well as my own) of how to treat an animal, as well being rural most kids I watch have pets at home living here in town adn many are farm kids. There is zero tolerance here for pulling on pets ears or tails etc. THe children and teh pet is never left unsupervised to ensure that appropriate behaviour is followed. As well my 2 teens help with both the dog and the kids (so taking the dog out to play mid-day while I deal with naps etc.

I am not going to bring a new dog home willy nilly so trying to gather as much general info as I can before talking to the contact person tonight and making arrangements to drive out and meet the dog.
 

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Ah one more important thing I forgot since this may be a young puppy: pomeranian puppies can be prone to hypoglycemia. This is a potentially dangerous drop in blood sugar, and can be avoided if they're fed on a consistent, frequent feeding schedule. I'd also recommend avoiding foods with high-glycemic ingredients like corn, as anything that spikes blood sugar rapidly can mess with blood sugar stability over time. Protein, fat, complex carbohydrates, and fiber are what help keep blood sugar stable, as well as frequent feedings.
Here's some more info: http://www.akcpomeranians.com/Pomeranian_Health_Hypoglycemia.aspx
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Small dog syndrome is not a temperament issue, it's a training issue. Basically, if you have a 90lb GSD mix, you'll train that dog, because if you don't, no one will be safe, not you or anyone around you. Even an enthusiastic greeting can be dangerous from a large dog. That's not an issue with small dogs, so a lot of owners of small dogs don't bother to train their dog at all and end up with a poorly behaved little monster. Then they have the nerve to blame the dog for its problems!

As for tracheal collapse, that happened to my boss' pom. I know they were using a flat buckle collar, and I find it hard to believe either he or his wife were jerking the dog around by the collar, and then switched to a harness afterwards.
That is really good to know. So good training is key just like with my big pup. Sounds like a harness is the only way to go with this kind of dog. That will be on the top of the list of supplies to pick up if we do bring one home.
 

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Ah one more important thing I forgot since this may be a young puppy: pomeranian puppies can be prone to hypoglycemia. This is a potentially dangerous drop in blood sugar, and can be avoided if they're fed on a consistent, frequent feeding schedule. I'd also recommend avoiding foods with high-glycemic ingredients like corn, as anything that spikes blood sugar rapidly can mess with blood sugar stability over time. Protein, fat, complex carbohydrates, and fiber are what help keep blood sugar stable, as well as frequent feedings.
Here's some more info: http://www.akcpomeranians.com/Pomeranian_Health_Hypoglycemia.aspx
Off to check that link. That is a very important piece of information for me to keep in mind.
 

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As for tracheal collapse, that happened to my boss' pom. I know they were using a flat buckle collar, and I find it hard to believe either he or his wife were jerking the dog around by the collar, and then switched to a harness afterwards.
My former pom ended up with a collapsed trachea as well and he was never a leash-puller, nor did we ever jerk his leash either. I wouldn't be surprised if it were a genetic issue. My parents picked out the puppy when I was quite young and I'm not sure he came from the best breeder (as much as he was a wonderful dog). But after that I just feel more comfortable avoiding collars with tiny dogs in the future to be extra safe. :)
 

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First off I want to say good luck and I hope the new dog works out :)

I've never personally owned a dog/mix of either breed, but my boyfriend's uncle owns a Pom. It was very barky/insecure and screamed of "small dog syndrome" to the max. But I would not say this is a breed specific behavior. It is very much a training issue.

If the dog is coming from a foster and not a shelter, I'd say that would increase your chances of a socialized/well-behaved dog. But I'm speaking in generalizations and I'm all opinion. If a more experienced member contradicts anything I've said I'd take their word over mine ;)
 

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i like poms a lot and i think between those 2 they are the more even tempered side. most of the american eskimos i have met have been... mmm.... off their rockers. amazing amounts of energy and BIG BIG attitudes. most of the ones ive worked with since being wee little pups had to be worked through their bad tempers. but maybe its just the ones im meeting... lol.
 

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My babysitter, who helped me raise my daughter for 14 years... had 2 poms and a rough collie. The dogs were never kept away from the kids, however the kids were taught from day one to respect the dogs.

In all those years, and my sitter had a range of babysitting kids from infant to early teen, we never had any issues with the poms getting "snappy" with the kids. They did have an area they could get away from the kids if they needed to.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Update: I decided not to get the dog. I couldn't get the contact person on the phone so I emailed. She made it sound like a puppy mill not a rescue. Like I was shopping for a dog, give my specs of age and gender and they had one kwim. Too sketchy for me so I refused to take one.
 

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I'm sorry to hear the pup didn't work out. :( Good call though, if it was truly a mill or BYB. I'm sure there's another dog out there with your name on it. ;)
 
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